charloootte2
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I have accepted an offer to study English literature at UEA, I do really enjoy English at A level but do find it really challenging. But I have a bad gut feeling that I have made a wrong choice. I originally was going to study psychology but after reading the heap guide and people's experiences of psychology at university, it appeared that psychology was a lot more science base with a big emphasises on biology. I got an E at AS biology so I decided to not apply for psychology. I would be very grateful for people's advice. Should I take a gap year and re-apply for different university/ courses?
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cbrown90
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If you're really not sure that you want to do the course you have applied for then I would recommend taking a gap year. Think about what you want to do in the future and options that you have after completing the course and this should help you decide. I had a friend that graduated with accounts and afterwards decided she really didn't want to work in accounts, now she doesn't have the money to go back to uni to study what she wants.
I've graduated in psychology and I am now going onto do my postgraduate so if you have any questions about psychology feel free to ask
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charloootte2
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(Original post by cbrown90)
If you're really not sure that you want to do the course you have applied for then I would recommend taking a gap year. Think about what you want to do in the future and options that you have after completing the course and this should help you decide. I had a friend that graduated with accounts and afterwards decided she really didn't want to work in accounts, now she doesn't have the money to go back to uni to study what she wants.
I've graduated in psychology and I am now going onto do my postgraduate so if you have any questions about psychology feel free to ask
Ah, thank you so much for replying! How much scientific content did your psychology course include? What percentage of the course was biological related and how difficult was the content? Also how were you assessed?
Sorry, I have asked you a lot of questions
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cbrown90
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There's so many different aspects of psychology e.g clinical, social, developmental. Before I started the course I didn't realise everything is research based in psychology which is the scientific part (everything known about psychology/all the theories to explain behaviours etc is conducted from scientific research). So research methods is a huge module in every psychology course, with lots of statistics which many people struggle with!
With regards to biologically related it depends which part of psychology. With regards to Clinical (mental health) you learn about parts of the brain etc that may be affected and scans which identify this. But you also learn about all of the environmental effects on mental health. So although biology plays a huge role it doesn't define psychology. If this makes sense? I hope I'm explaining it correctly lol.

Assessments were essays and lots of research reports where you conduct experiments to test a particular theory and analyse results which you then write up as a report. Final year you do your dissertation which is your own large piece of research and this accounts for a large proportion of you're overall grade.

The most difficult part I found was that you are taught so much different aspects that you may not be interested in eg animal psychology! When really all I wanted to study was the Clinical side! Although I don't know if every uni is the same. I studied in Scotland which was a four year course.

Do you know which part of psychology you are interested in and which you would like to specialise in?
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charloootte2
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I am interested in developmental psychology, psychopaths, criminology and social psychology.
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susanalbumparty
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(Original post by charloootte2)
I am interested in developmental psychology, psychopaths, criminology and social psychology.
There is lots of biology in psychology, but you do not learn in depth about biological theory, only how it relates to psychology. So you would need to learn alot about (a) different brain scanning techniques (b) names of different parts of the brain (c) very basic stuff on how neurons work, then your set for applying this to behaviour.

So in psychopathy, using the example of children with "callous-unemotional" (i.e. psychopathic) traits, but you mostly learn about either different absolute sizes of different parts of the brain, how different parts of the brain "activate" during certain tasks (children with callous-unemotional traits show decreased activation in the amygdala during an affective theory of mind task, for example), or how damage to different parts of the brain differentially impairs different tasks (i.e. damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex impairs performance on a theory of mind task but not emotional recognition). However you would also have to look at things like twin studies which show that psychopathy in children is highy heritable, and that environmental factors appear to be less important for determining disruptive behaviour in children in psychopathic traits (compared to disruptive children without these traits). Unless you opt to do more advanced third or second year neuropsychology modules the biology doesn't get too hard.
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charloootte2
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(Original post by susanalbumparty)
There is lots of biology in psychology, but you do not learn in depth about biological theory, only how it relates to psychology. So you would need to learn alot about (a) different brain scanning techniques (b) names of different parts of the brain (c) very basic stuff on how neurons work, then your set for applying this to behaviour.

So in psychopathy, using the example of children with "callous-unemotional" (i.e. psychopathic) traits, but you mostly learn about either different absolute sizes of different parts of the brain, how different parts of the brain "activate" during certain tasks (children with callous-unemotional traits show decreased activation in the amygdala during an affective theory of mind task, for example), or how damage to different parts of the brain differentially impairs different tasks (i.e. damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex impairs performance on a theory of mind task but not emotional recognition). However you would also have to look at things like twin studies which show that psychopathy in children is highy heritable, and that environmental factors appear to be less important for determining disruptive behaviour in children in psychopathic traits (compared to disruptive children without these traits). Unless you opt to do more advanced third or second year neuropsychology modules the biology doesn't get too hard.
This is very useful thank you
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