Part-Time Work and a Law Degree

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kingslaw
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After looking at some of the prices of accomodation in London next year, I am now considering getting a part-time job to help my parents pay for it (I've always disliked sponging of my parents). I'm at home now where I work 2/3 days a week and get £60-£80 (although I have to sacrifice my Fridays and Saturdays), so I assume I'll get similar pay if I work the same in London, or maybe more with London weighting and everything.

However, I dont know whether I'll have enough time to get a part-time job whilst studying. I was wondering whether anyone could give me their experiences of juggling doing a highly time consuming degree like law (or any other degree) and having a part-time job? Is it possible? Are you ulitimately sacrificing getting a high class degree by doing part-time work (because that is what I really DONT want to do)? If it means anything, I'll be reading law at Kings.

All responses appreciated, especially from those who have been in similar circumstances.
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cobra
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(Original post by kingslaw)
After looking at some of the prices of accomodation in London next year, I am now considering getting a part-time job to help my parents pay for it (I've always disliked sponging of my parents). I'm at home now where I work 2/3 days a week and get £60-£80 (although I have to sacrifice my Fridays and Saturdays), so I assume I'll get similar pay if I work the same in London, or maybe more with London weighting and everything.

However, I dont know whether I'll have enough time to get a part-time job whilst studying. I was wondering whether anyone could give me their experiences of juggling doing a highly time consuming degree like law (or any other degree) and having a part-time job? Is it possible? Are you ulitimately sacrificing getting a high class degree by doing part-time work (because that is what I really DONT want to do)? If it means anything, I'll be reading law at Kings.

All responses appreciated, especially from those who have been in similar circumstances.
If you have a job you will spend less time studying, its just if you can have the commitment to do the amount of work needed on top of the payed work to get a good degree, though i think it is easier to balence with a course which requires more individual study, like law, rarther than chemistry like i'm goin to do where you have virtually a full week of lectures/practicals/workshops etc and then have no time to have a job
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seana
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(Original post by cobra01977)
If you have a job you will spend less time studying, its just if you can have the commitment to do the amount of work needed on top of the payed work to get a good degree, though i think it is easier to balence with a course which requires more individual study, like law, rarther than chemistry like i'm goin to do where you have virtually a full week of lectures/practicals/workshops etc and then have no time to have a job
I honestly think it can be done and I agree with you that it takes alot of commitment and focus. I am also well aware of students 'wasting' twenty hours a week idling rather than studying...so if you have the commitment go for it...I would not recommend it in final year though...
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sashh
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Don't forget the university hardship fund. There is priority for final year students so if you work part time for the first two years you can apply on the grounds that you are unable to study and continue work. Not much help in the first year but worth considering.

What work are you doing now? There's lots of 'customer centred' jobs in London, bar work, hotels etc. I think a lot also depends on what kind of person you are. If you enjoy work and you have something which can substitute for part of your social life you will do better than someone who hates their job.

It also looks incredibly good on your CV if you have worked and studied and still come out with a good degree.
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kingslaw
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(Original post by sashh)
What work are you doing now? There's lots of 'customer centred' jobs in London, bar work, hotels etc. I think a lot also depends on what kind of person you are. If you enjoy work and you have something which can substitute for part of your social life you will do better than someone who hates their job.
Im a waiter so that should help me in getting a job in 'customer centred' work as it is customer contact orientated. However, I would stray from saying that it forms part of my social life!

I think I'm definitely going to go for a part-time job when I go in October. In the long-term it would make me happier than having to phone up my mum every other week asking for more money. I'm pretty good at managing my time as well so I think I should be able to get through the 3 years doing a job and getting a good standard degree (as I want to go into law, it will HAVE to be a good standard degree (2:1 or 1st!)). I think going into catered accomodation should help me as well as I wont have to spend time thinking about shopping or cooking food.
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rah
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there was an article recently saying how students who have part time jobs receive on average lower degrees than those who dont. working more than 15 hours a week will seriously mess up your degree.

hmm doing a high workload subject like law...not sure is a good idea
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muncrun
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A law degree is a heck of a lot of work, but I don't think this should preclude you from seeking work. It will actually do you a favour - it brightens up your CV a little, and in a highly competitive course like law this may well give you the edge.

As for having the the time to do it, this won't be a problem if you can organise. I generally do all my degree work during the day by waking early and working through until the late afternoon. That way you have the evenings to spend as you please. But it requires organisation and a degree of dedication to run your life like this.

I say go for it.
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~Sam~
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I'm going to get a part-time job when I go to uni, there's no way I'll be able to afford it otherwise. I think it should be fine as long as you don't do too many hours. You could just work on a few evenings a week or whatever
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H&E
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(Original post by kingslaw)
After looking at some of the prices of accomodation in London next year, I am now considering getting a part-time job to help my parents pay for it (I've always disliked sponging of my parents). I'm at home now where I work 2/3 days a week and get £60-£80 (although I have to sacrifice my Fridays and Saturdays), so I assume I'll get similar pay if I work the same in London, or maybe more with London weighting and everything.

However, I dont know whether I'll have enough time to get a part-time job whilst studying. I was wondering whether anyone could give me their experiences of juggling doing a highly time consuming degree like law (or any other degree) and having a part-time job? Is it possible? Are you ulitimately sacrificing getting a high class degree by doing part-time work (because that is what I really DONT want to do)? If it means anything, I'll be reading law at Kings.

All responses appreciated, especially from those who have been in similar circumstances.
I'm in a similar situation in terms of balancing a heavy workload with work. My decision was to work during the summer, rather than term time. There are several reasons for this. Firstly, I want to get the most out of university, and this will be seriously inhibited by working during term time. Secondly, the larger starting salary I could expect with a 1st rather than a 2:1 will quickly make up for any money I earn during term time. Finally, during the summer I can choose where I work far more carefully, which means I'll probably enjoy my job more, and may well earn more money. It could even add to my CV.

For a subject like Law, where getting work placements/internships is extremely important, I would say this becomes even more true. Work hard, get a 1st, then get a summer internship at one of the big law firms. They pay £250 a week, so you'll likely receive around £2,000. It's also an excellent CV point.
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