Lamalam
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In here I know benzene is more stable and I gor stuck and cannot procees to think that more energy is required to break bonds in benzene , I once draw a energy diagram and that the benzene is at a lower energy level than cyclohexane , but then should benzene requires less energy to break the bond?

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charco
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(Original post by Lamalam)
Attachment 291835Attachment 291836

In here I know benzene is more stable and I gor stuck and cannot procees to think that more energy is required to break bonds in benzene , I once draw a energy diagram and that the benzene is at a lower energy level than cyclohexane , but then should benzene requires less energy to break the bond?

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Benzene is indeed lower in energy and the separated atoms are at very high energy. This means that more energy is needed to break benzene apart (the bonds are stronger than expected due to delocalisation energy)
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Lamalam
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(Original post by charco)
Benzene is indeed lower in energy and the separated atoms are at very high energy. This means that more energy is needed to break benzene apart (the bonds are stronger than expected due to delocalisation energy)
Does it mean that I wont see it from the diagram coz it seems to me that shorter energy level "distance" from the product in the energy diagram seems to require less heat @@




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charco
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(Original post by Lamalam)
Does it mean that I wont see it from the diagram coz it seems to me that shorter energy level "distance" from the product in the energy diagram seems to require less heat @@




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click around this interactive on benzene .... it may help.
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Lamalam
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Thanks. it really helps ! Can u correct me if I am wrong ?
Benzene is at a lower energy level than the (cyclohexene *3 ) so benzene is more stable than the (cyclohexene*3) , since less energy is released in the reaction from benzene to cyclohaxane, compared to the (cyclohexene *3 ) , I relatively need to supply more energy into benzene t break the bond. Is my cause and consequence here [email protected]@

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Lamalam
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(Original post by charco)
click around this interactive on benzene .... it may help.
Thanks. it really helps ! Can u correct me if I am wrong ?
Benzene is at a lower energy level than the (cyclohexene *3 ) so benzene is more stable than the (cyclohexene*3) , since less energy is released in the reaction from benzene to cyclohaxane, compared to the (cyclohexene *3 ) , I relatively need to supply more energy into benzene t break the bond. Is my cause and consequence here [email protected]@

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charco
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(Original post by Lamalam)
Thanks. it really helps ! Can u correct me if I am wrong ?
Benzene is at a lower energy level than the (cyclohexene *3 ) so benzene is more stable than the (cyclohexene*3) , since less energy is released in the reaction from benzene to cyclohaxane, compared to the (cyclohexene *3 ) , I relatively need to supply more energy into benzene t break the bond. Is my cause and consequence here [email protected]@

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Partially.

The energy required to break the bonds would be the bond enthalpy for the benzene CC bonds.

These are relatively stronger and hence more energy is needed.

The energy released by forming the bonds in the products is the same in all cases. Hence the overall energy change of the reaction is E(bond enthalpy benzene) - E(bond enthalpy products) = reaction enthalpy.

As the reaction enthalpy is less negative then the E(bond enthalpy benzene) must be more positive, i.e. the bonds are stronger = more stable.
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