Adriaan
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http://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-...-success-rates

These statistics show the admission and application statistics for the different colleges of the university of Oxford. The numbers show a huge difference between colleges in the percentage of people accepted into the university who applied to a certain college. For example, 27% of applicants to Somerville college get accepted into the university of Oxford, while this is the case for only 17% of St Catherine's applicants. Does this mean that there actually is a difference in your admission depending on your college choice? Or does Somerville just attract 'better' applicants than St Catherine? I'm not sure how to interpret these numbers. (Not really a math brain, applying as international student for law in October )

Hope TSR people can help me out!
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cambio wechsel
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There are more than 30 undergraduate colleges at the University of Oxford and you report a 10% spread between extremes. What would you imagine as normal under random distribution? How about in the heights of thirty 6-year old children?

We could speculate as to why these two should be 'outliers', though neither is that. Somerville plainly gets comparatively few applications in the first instance and I'm betting it gets few enough from overseas students. Because what do they fancy in it? But overseas candidates have a very high failure rate relative to domestic applicants. And Somerville doesn't offer Economics and Management, which is the Oxford course that knocks 'em back at the highest rate. And perhaps so on...

Unpartitioned data is very difficult to work with, but I think the good word from Oxford is anyway to just apply where you fancy. The interviewers all work for the university and a department as well for their colleges and if they like you they will see you installed somewhere.
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fluteflute
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Does this mean that there actually is a difference in your admission depending on your college choice? Or does Somerville just attract 'better' applicants than St Catherine? I'm not sure how to interpret these numbers. (Not really a math brain, applying as international student for law in October )

Hope TSR people can help me out!
It's almost certainly that it gets weaker applicants. e.g. St Catherine's has much more buildings than most colleges, which for a lot of people makes them a less desirable place to be than the several hundred year old colleges. Therefore some weaker candidates will apply there, wrongly thinking it increases their chances. (Of course this is speculative, but it shows that innocent explanations may well exist for these discrepancies.)

Conclusion: apply wherever you fancy, your chances of getting in aren't going to be affected
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Adriaan
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(Original post by cambio wechsel)
There are more than 30 undergraduate colleges at the University of Oxford and you report a 10% spread between extremes. What would you imagine as normal under random distribution? How about in the heights of thirty 6-year old children?

We could speculate as to why these two should be 'outliers', though neither is that. Somerville plainly gets comparatively few applications in the first instance and I'm betting it gets few enough from overseas students. Because what do they fancy in it? But overseas candidates have a very high failure rate relative to domestic applicants. And Somerville doesn't offer Economics and Management, which is the Oxford course that knocks 'em back at the highest rate. And perhaps so on...

Unpartitioned data is very difficult to work with, but I think the good word from Oxford is anyway to just apply where you fancy. The interviewers all work for the university and a department as well for their colleges and if they like you they will see you installed somewhere.
(Original post by fluteflute)
It's almost certainly that it gets weaker applicants. e.g. St Catherine's has much more buildings than most colleges, which for a lot of people makes them a less desirable place to be than the several hundred year old colleges. Therefore some weaker candidates will apply there, wrongly thinking it increases their chances. (Of course this is speculative, but it shows that innocent explanations may well exist for these discrepancies.)

Conclusion: apply wherever you fancy, your chances of getting in aren't going to be affected
Thank you for both for your elaboration, I will indeed just choose one I fancy then. I'm currently considering New College (beautiful and good accommodation), Christ Church (beautiful, renown law library, but very competitive ) and Magdalen (beautiful site as well, but also competitive). Any comments on those choices perhaps? This weekend I will visit both Oxford and Cambridge to explore the cities and hopefully find out which of the two I prefer as the law curriculum itself pretty much evens out for me at both universities. Do you happen to have any recommendations on places I should really visit?
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cambio wechsel
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Thank you for both for your elaboration, I will indeed just choose one I fancy then. I'm currently considering New College (beautiful and good accommodation), Christ Church (beautiful, renown law library, but very competitive ) and Magdalen (beautiful site as well, but also competitive). Any comments on those choices perhaps?
I wonder how important any of these considerations need be. None of them would be of much concern for me and it's perfectly possible that your pal at St. Catherine's might have from his bedroom a better view of Magdalen than you'll have. He could anyway pop 'round for a look at it anytime he fancied and then bugger off when all the tourists got a bit much.

My own first inclination would be to look at the price of accommodation and whether it is available in all three years. I should want as well to know whether I have to pay for all my meals whether I eat them or not because it would be a pain in the arse to keep going back for lunch when friends were doing something else or to think that I'd paid for a meal I'd not eaten. I'd choose a rich college because they splash the cash on travel grants and what have you.

Possibly these seem mundane concerns but you don't want to be a dipstick only applying for HarryPotter Corridge because it is that.

EDIT: This might help: http://issuu.com/ousu/docs/ap2014-16/3?e=0/7242535
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Adriaan)
as the law curriculum itself pretty much evens out for me at both universities.
If you cannot spot that there is a considerable difference between the two law courses, law might not be the subject for you.
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Adriaan
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
If you cannot spot that there is a considerable difference between the two law courses, law might not be the subject for you.
Actually, I am aware of the differences between the course structures and examination systems. They just even out for me because I find both courses to have its advantages and disadvatages, that is what I meant.


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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Actually, I am aware of the differences between the course structures and examination systems. They just even out for me because I find both courses to have its advantages and disadvatages, that is what I meant.
I understand
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mishieru07
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Actually, I am aware of the differences between the course structures and examination systems. They just even out for me because I find both courses to have its advantages and disadvatages, that is what I meant.


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As a Law Finalist, at the risk of sounding patronizing, I would really, really recommend thinking about:
(a) Are you okay with Jurisprudence as a compulsory module? I have friends who absolutely, absolutely abhorred it (Personally I'd say it's somewhat different from the other subjects, and reactions tend to be polarized).
(b) Would you prefer to have more options? You only get 2 at Oxford, Cambridge has more (and they also have half-modules I think). Personally, I would have preferred dropping Juris and taking a third option instead.
(c) Would you rather have exams every year or everything crammed into one massive exam right at the end? Finals sounds far away, but having just been through 6 consecutive days of exams for the past week, I can tell you it's nothing short of brutal and exhausting. And I still have another 3 papers to go before I finish next week. Don't underestimate this difference - it is much more intense and far harder than anything I ever did at A levels.

I would say that Finals alone would make me seriously consider going to Cambridge in retrospect, but I'm obviously biased at the moment. Also, if you're the sort of person who prefers taking more time to "ease in", Cambridge might be a better option because Law Mods takes place after 2 terms; I did feel like I was still trying to find my "law legs" back then (well, still trying to now actually).

Out of curiosity, which aspects of the Ox course do you find advantageous vis a vis Cambridge?
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amol_chalis447
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Thank you for both for your elaboration, I will indeed just choose one I fancy then. I'm currently considering New College (beautiful and good accommodation), Christ Church (beautiful, renown law library, but very competitive ) and Magdalen (beautiful site as well, but also competitive). Any comments on those choices perhaps? This weekend I will visit both Oxford and Cambridge to explore the cities and hopefully find out which of the two I prefer as the law curriculum itself pretty much evens out for me at both universities. Do you happen to have any recommendations on places I should really visit?
Choose New! Choose New!

New is central, very close to the Law Department (unlike ChCh), very beautiful (have you seen our gardens? <3) and all students in college get mini-fridges!

With respect to the cost (food and acco), it's roughly the same as ChCh but cheaper than Magdalen.

One distinct disadvantage: the library is not 24 hours. However if you want study late there's a separate room for that, just not the library.

As for accommodation, New's is fantastic. I think every room is a single room and a huge number are en-suite. You can trade en-suite for access to a kitchen in the second year. While New doesn't provide accommodation to all 3rd year students (and Magdalen does) I saw this as an advantage. It prepares you for the next year when you'll be living on your own and facing the world. It's sort of a stepping stone since being part of New means you can access a lot of facilities. But some might see it as a disadvantage still.
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amol_chalis447
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Not really a math brain, applying as international student for law in October
Forgot to mention: I'm also an international student (Indian) with other qualifications. I'll be reading Law at New this year
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anyone_can_fly
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(Original post by amol_chalis447)
As for accommodation, New's is fantastic. I think every room is a single room and a huge number are en-suite. You can trade en-suite for access to a kitchen in the second year. While New doesn't provide accommodation to all 3rd year students (and Magdalen does) I saw this as an advantage. It prepares you for the next year when you'll be living on your own and facing the world. It's sort of a stepping stone since being part of New means you can access a lot of facilities. But some might see it as a disadvantage still.
I believe that this is true in every college.
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fluteflute
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(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
I believe that this is true in every college.
It's not, e.g. Univ and Christ Church (but it's rare, and I'm fairly sure it would only be for people who want to live with a friend they've met in first year).

(Although we're talking here about individual bedrooms with shared living space, so it's not room sharing in a traditional sense.)
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mishieru07
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(Original post by fluteflute)
It's not, e.g. Univ and Christ Church (but it's rare, and I'm fairly sure it would only be for people who want to live with a friend they've met in first year).

(Although we're talking here about individual bedrooms with shared living space, so it's not room sharing in a traditional sense.)
Brasenose has double and triple rooms too, but not all of them have separate bedrooms - eg some of them have one bedroom and one shared living space (with another bed and desk). That said, everyone who lives in the shared rooms does so by choice anyway.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by fluteflute)
It's not, e.g. Univ and Christ Church (but it's rare, and I'm fairly sure it would only be for people who want to live with a friend they've met in first year).
It certainly didn't used to be. Quite a few first years used to end up in double sets.
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amol_chalis447
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(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
I believe that this is true in every college.
I think the others have clarified what I meant (single sets as opposed to double sets). Sorry for not being very clear about it though!
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Adriaan
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(Original post by mishieru07)
As a Law Finalist, at the risk of sounding patronizing, I would really, really recommend thinking about:
(a) Are you okay with Jurisprudence as a compulsory module? I have friends who absolutely, absolutely abhorred it (Personally I'd say it's somewhat different from the other subjects, and reactions tend to be polarized).
(b) Would you prefer to have more options? You only get 2 at Oxford, Cambridge has more (and they also have half-modules I think). Personally, I would have preferred dropping Juris and taking a third option instead.
(c) Would you rather have exams every year or everything crammed into one massive exam right at the end? Finals sounds far away, but having just been through 6 consecutive days of exams for the past week, I can tell you it's nothing short of brutal and exhausting. And I still have another 3 papers to go before I finish next week. Don't underestimate this difference - it is much more intense and far harder than anything I ever did at A levels.

I would say that Finals alone would make me seriously consider going to Cambridge in retrospect, but I'm obviously biased at the moment. Also, if you're the sort of person who prefers taking more time to "ease in", Cambridge might be a better option because Law Mods takes place after 2 terms; I did feel like I was still trying to find my "law legs" back then (well, still trying to now actually).

Out of curiosity, which aspects of the Ox course do you find advantageous vis a vis Cambridge?

Hi, thank your for your response.
My apologies for my late reaction, I was actually in Cambridge, Oxford and London the last few days.
I'm currently reading Hart, I don't know if that is the kind of material you get when taking Jurisprudence but if so, I think I'd quite enjoy it. I always thought Jurisprudence to be closely related to legal philosophy, but maybe that is a misconception.

For your other points and the comparison between Oxford law and Cambridge law: I think that the freedom you get at Cambridge speaks indeed for them. Both examination policies have their advantages and disadvantages in my opinion, but I find it really difficult to judge them.

What I find great about the Oxford course is that, according to McBride anyway, it's more focussed on thinking on a deeper level about law than the Cambridge equivalent, which results in primarily essay writing exams in Oxford and problem solving questions at Cambridge. Besides that, I was told that due to the smaller amount of papers taken in Oxford, Oxford students tend to have a more thorough understanding of the subjects that they study. Just to be clear though, I am not saying that the Cambridge course is superficial or less challenging due to its problem solving focus, both courses are extremely good in my opinion. I'd probably just prefer a deeper, 'smaller' knowledge over a wider knowledge.
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Estreth
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Jurisprudence is not just closely related to legal philosophy; it is legal philosophy. (Also = philosophy of law.)
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Adriaan
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(Original post by amol_chalis447)
Forgot to mention: I'm also an international student (Indian) with other qualifications. I'll be reading Law at New this year
Thanks for your advice, after having visited however, I think I'll apply to Merton, spent about an hour in their gardens!
How did you prepare for the LNAT though, I had the opportunity to speak with a Brasenose Law tutor and he told me that the LNAT is extremely important for the decision whether you get an interview.
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anyone_can_fly
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(Original post by Adriaan)
Thanks for your advice, after having visited however, I think I'll apply to Merton, spent about an hour in their gardens!
How did you prepare for the LNAT though, I had the opportunity to speak with a Brasenose Law tutor and he told me that the LNAT is extremely important for the decision whether you get an interview.
Yay, Merton! If you have any questions about the college, feel free to ask me.
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