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Languages at A level watch

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    Hello I've been thinking about studying both French and Spanish at A level and was wondering if they clash and how difficult they are? If anyone has took either/both I would appreciate your feedback!
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    What do you mean by if they clash?

    Also, difficulty is very subjective. If you are very good at languages and are willing to put in a lot of work, then they aren't hard. French and Spanish aren't particularly difficult in themselves, so if you've done well with these languages in the past then you'll be fine
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    I take both Spanish and French, but only take two if you really love languages! They're very rewarding and although the work load is more intense than with my other subjects (English Literature and English Language), I find them really enjoyable because with languages there's such a variety of different units and they're very cross-curricular so you can learn about a variety of things that are going on in the world.

    I usually don't get them confused and I've found that as I've learnt more about each language, the differences really stand out. Sometimes when I'm speaking I might accidentally say a word in Spanish when I'm meant to be talking French, but it's only a minor thing and I usually recognise my mistakes. I find that before speaking, I try to immerse myself in the language that I'll be speaking and then there's no confusion. Also,when I'm writing things down, it's much harder to confuse the two because I tend to spend more time thinking about the exact phrasing, grammar and vocabulary.

    In conclusion, taking two languages at A Level is a very rewarding experience and you'll definitely enjoy it if you've enjoyed languages in the past. I definitely think taking two has many more advantages than disadvantages, particularly with recognition of vocabulary!
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    I do Spanish at A level, I'd agree with the above poster in that the work load is pretty intense. You have to revise consistently throughout the year learning vocabulary & grammar, you can't just cram it all into a month like some other subjects. Saying that, I'd definitely recommend it though, you'll improve so much over the 2 years and it's so rewarding when you can understand people speaking in the street or you can actually have a proper conversation with a native speaker.

    With regards to clashing, I can't speak for A level, but I did both at GCSE and I was always getting confused. I even get confused now between Spanish and English sometimes :rolleyes: I guess, as you go into more depth you'll be able to differentiate more easily. I'd definitely say take them both if you enjoy them though, languages are awesome!
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    I've just finished AS French but unfortunately do not take Spanish as well, however a lot of people in my class do. I considered French a big step up from GCSE and initially found it to be a lot of work, feeling like I had to catch up with the rest of the class (I felt pretty crap at French at first despite getting an A* at GCSE) however after you get used to the workload and the type of content you will need to learn it is a fun subject to take. Do you know what exam boards your sixth form would be using? People in my class have said they found Spanish harder but it was more to do with the exam board being slightly harder (Spanish was Edexcel I think while French was AQA). The only thing I would consider is oral exams- personally, I would not be able to concentrate on learning enough for two oral exams in different languages, however this does not mean that you would not be able to.

    Hope my waffling has helped in some way.
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    Hi - I'm taking my A2 Spanish exam next week and I'm reading it at uni in autumn. In my experience, most of what everybody else has written is accurate. The work load is tough and there's a big jump from GCSE to A-level standard. If you're prepared to do the work and not just be lazy then I fully recommend going for languages. They're extremely useful skills and highly respected.

    Best of luck with whatever you decide!
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    The step up from GCSE is huge so you have to be prepared to put in a lot of work. I easily got an A* at French GCSE but ended up with a B at AS level which was quite disappointing - ended up dropping it for A2, couldn't cope with the work load.
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    Language A Levels are one of the hardest in terms of jump from GCSE, so be aware of that. The best thing you can do right now if learn your verb conjugations and tenses. I recommend listening to French/Spanish radio, music, TV or film. You don't have to understand it, but just to tune your ears to the languages, it really helps with accents too. When you start the course, try develop a vocabulary learning system. I like to make online flashcards every week during a free period and test myself on them every now and then. It really helps.

    The good news is that there is a lot less revision needed when it comes to exam season. The whole thing is linear, so your language ability will constantly develop unlike other subjects where you study hard on a topic, drop it, then move on to another. This doesn't happen with French or Spanish thankfully and it reduces exam stress brilliantly. It does start off very hard unlike other subjects, but gets easier as you progress.

    Two pieces of advice however. If you're not a confident speaker you may find it harder, especially with the oral. And two language A Levels is somewhat difficult and limiting. It's better to focus on getting one language up to a high standard than having two to deal with. Why not try both out at AS level, then you can always ditch one for A2.

    Bonne chance avec votre études de langues! // ¡Buena suerte con sus estudios de idiomas!
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    I'm doing both French and Spanish at IB at the minute (similar to A levels) and I really enjoy doing them! It is a lot of hard work and I find that you need to constantly do work for them (you can't just revise before the exams you've got to practice throughout the year).

    I find that they do "clash" at times, for example in French I pronounce my "r"s the Spanish way (but I have been doing Spanish for a lot longer than French). On the other hand, as they are kind of similar it often helps, for example there are lots of similar words between the two and it makes it easier to learn and recognise vocabulary. Also, it makes it easier to understand grammar if your getting twice as many lessons on it a week!

    Hope this helps :-)
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    I'm doing French and German at A2, and I have to say that sometimes I do get slightly muddled, especially as my timetable on some days had me sat in the same classroom for two hours, but with one hour of French and and the other in German. Languages are very demanding subjects but also I find them to be the most rewarding. The jump between GCSE and A-level is huge and pretty much shows how GCSE exams don't really represent your knowledge in a subject. Lots of people in my year who got A* at GCSE came out with Cs at AS. If you're doing a language which is done by a lot of natives in this country, then there will be a high level of competition and grade boundaries are often horrifically high (as is the case with German, not so much with French)

    Despite this, if you really enjoy doing languages then I'd say go for it It is difficult at first but you've just got to keep learning grammar and things on a regular basis and it will become more natural and enjoyable

    Hope this helps a bit!
 
 
 
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