Taking two degrees one after the other

Watch
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Not sure if this is the correct sub-forum, but I was unsure as to where this belonged and so apologies if this is the incorrect place. I am not sure if this is something I would want to do at the moment, seeing as I haven't even started sixth-form yet. However, for future reference, I was wondering whether it is possible to take two degrees one after the other. How would it work out in the financial department, with regards to student loans the like?
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by Brad387)
Not sure if this is the correct sub-forum, but I was unsure as to where this belonged and so apologies if this is the incorrect place. I am not sure if this is something I would want to do at the moment, seeing as I haven't even started sixth-form yet. However, for future reference, I was wondering whether it is possible to take two degrees one after the other. How would it work out in the financial department, with regards to student loans the like?
For the most part you can only get student loans for one degree. The only exceptions are if the second degree is a PGCE or a health degree (in which case you get an NHS bursary and reduced rate student finance funding).Plus in the majority of cases doing two undergraduate degrees is largely pointless anyway.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by jelly1000)
For the most part you can only get student loans for one degree. The only exceptions are if the second degree is a PGCE or a health degree (in which case you get an NHS bursary and reduced rate student finance funding).Plus in the majority of cases doing two undergraduate degrees is largely pointless anyway.
Thanks for the very swift reply. So, to put rather basically, a second degree would have to be entirely self-financed? I suspected as much, but just wanted to check. What makes you say that two undergraduate degrees are pointless anyway?
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Brad387)
Thanks for the very swift reply. So, to put rather basically, a second degree would have to be entirely self-financed? I suspected as much, but just wanted to check. What makes you say that two undergraduate degrees are pointless anyway?
Yes it would do. And because the second degree won't help you get a job, its experience plus the first degree that helps, if you want to go into academia you need a Masters & Phd not a second degree and if you decide you want to study something different there are postgraduate conversion courses such as the GDL which work out cheaper and take less time.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by jelly1000)
Yes it would do. And because the second degree won't help you get a job, its experience plus the first degree that helps, if you want to go into academia you need a Masters & Phd not a second degree and if you decide you want to study something different there are postgraduate conversion courses such as the GDL which work out cheaper and take less time.
Okay. Thanks for the information. I have though, believe it or not, heard of a fair few taking multiple undergraduate degrees one after the other which is why I asked. Are there really no circumstances in which it is useful, because there are even a fair few threads on here with users who have taken succeeding undergraduate degrees? But, if I were to go with what you were saying, you should take an undergraduate degree and then pursue postgraduate education or aim for simply getting experience in your chosen workfield?
1
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Brad387)
Okay. Thanks for the information. I have though, believe it or not, heard of a fair few taking multiple undergraduate degrees one after the other which is why I asked. Are there really no circumstances in which it is useful, because there are even a fair few threads on here with users who have taken succeeding undergraduate degrees? But, if I were to go with what you were saying, you should take an undergraduate degree and then pursue postgraduate education or aim for simply getting experience in your chosen workfield?
What were the degrees they took? I've not heard of any cases as most people can't afford it. I've seen people go from undergraduate to Masters to Phd or to start again if they didn't like the first course or drop out. And in most cases undergraduate education + work experience is sufficient.
0
reply
SilverstarDJ
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by Brad387)
Okay. Thanks for the information. I have though, believe it or not, heard of a fair few taking multiple undergraduate degrees one after the other which is why I asked. Are there really no circumstances in which it is useful, because there are even a fair few threads on here with users who have taken succeeding undergraduate degrees? But, if I were to go with what you were saying, you should take an undergraduate degree and then pursue postgraduate education or aim for simply getting experience in your chosen workfield?
I know vet students who have had previous degrees - usually because they decided they wanted a different career than their original degree could provide. But at the end of their second degree they have no more job opportunities than someone who went to study that subject straight away. So it's pointless to aim to do two undergrad degree but it might be something you would do if you made the wrong choice first time round.

Postgraduate education is about enhancing your career options. E.g. if you want to teach you need a PGCE, or if you want to become a lecturer you would need to do a masters than PhD.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by SilverstarDJ)
I know vet students who have had previous degrees - usually because they decided they wanted a different career than their original degree could provide. But at the end of their second degree they have no more job opportunities than someone who went to study that subject straight away. So it's pointless to aim to do two undergrad degree but it might be something you would do if you made the wrong choice first time round.

Postgraduate education is about enhancing your career options. E.g. if you want to teach you need a PGCE, or if you want to become a lecturer you would need to do a masters than PhD.
Okay. Thanks for the information. I intend to take an undergraduate degree in journalism, so I'm not particularly sure of how much benefit a Masters, PhD or second undergraduate course would benefit me - unless I realise that said course choice was a mistake. It's still two years off, but I like to be prepared. I just need to start looking at the different courses then, since there are a few different journalism degrees. There's JH with Literature, etc.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by jelly1000)
What were the degrees they took? I've not heard of any cases as most people can't afford it. I've seen people go from undergraduate to Masters to Phd or to start again if they didn't like the first course or drop out. And in most cases undergraduate education + work experience is sufficient.
I've heard of some taking the arts and then afterwards the sciences, on these very forums if I remember rightly, but it doesn't matter too much. I was mainly just curious, yet it seems now to be pretty unanimous in it being a silly idea unless you're unhappy with your first course. Speaking of courses, I really want to begin deciding upon a course. I want to get into journalism, but even with a journalism degree there are a few options. Most are JH with Literature or Sociology, whilst others have cultural studies, etc.
0
reply
ageshallnot
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Brad387)
Okay. Thanks for the information. I intend to take an undergraduate degree in journalism, so I'm not particularly sure of how much benefit a Masters, PhD or second undergraduate course would benefit me - unless I realise that said course choice was a mistake. It's still two years off, but I like to be prepared. I just need to start looking at the different courses then, since there are a few different journalism degrees. There's JH with Literature, etc.
Given the career choice you are considering, you might want to think about doing another subject at undergraduate level then a Master's in journalism.
0
reply
cambio wechsel
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
The only first degree that is at all commonly taken as a second bachelors is Law (typically done with senior status).
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Brad387)
I've heard of some taking the arts and then afterwards the sciences, on these very forums if I remember rightly, but it doesn't matter too much. I was mainly just curious, yet it seems now to be pretty unanimous in it being a silly idea unless you're unhappy with your first course. Speaking of courses, I really want to begin deciding upon a course. I want to get into journalism, but even with a journalism degree there are a few options. Most are JH with Literature or Sociology, whilst others have cultural studies, etc.
That's because most journalists don't do journalism as a degree. They take a subject in an area of interest like History, Economics, English Lit e.c.t and then do a postgraduate journalism diploma. And that is what I would recommend you to do. Means if you change your mind on what you want to to do as a career you have a more versatile first degree.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by jelly1000)
That's because most journalists don't do journalism as a degree. They take a subject in an area of interest like History, Economics, English Lit e.c.t and then do a postgraduate journalism diploma. And that is what I would recommend you to do. Means if you change your mind on what you want to to do as a career you have a more versatile first degree.
How does a Masters work exactly, since I've never really heard much about it, with specific regards to financing?
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by Brad387)
How does a Masters work exactly, since I've never really heard much about it, with specific regards to financing?
This is considered one of the best universities for the diplomahttp://courses.cardiff.ac.uk/postgraduate/course/detail/p169.html

There is no student finance system at postgraduate level, there are sometimes scholarships and bursaries or you can take out a career development loan if you have a good enough credit record.
0
reply
Brad387
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#15
(Original post by jelly1000)
This is considered one of the best universities for the diplomahttp://courses.cardiff.ac.uk/postgraduate/course/detail/p169.html

There is no student finance system at postgraduate level, there are sometimes scholarships and bursaries or you can take out a career development loan if you have a good enough credit record.
As appealing as a Masters degree is, the idea of having to take a bank loans and whatnot isn't. I don't quite see how I could ever afford it...
0
reply
Mathsz0r
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
Get your A-Level's and degree first kid, then talk about doing your second degree.

Another word of warning, don't to journalism/English Language etc if you want to actually be employable.
0
reply
Mathsz0r
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by Brad387)
As appealing as a Masters degree is, the idea of having to take a bank loans and whatnot isn't. I don't quite see how I could ever afford it...
Your Masters is covered by student finance.
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by Mathsz0r)
Your Masters is covered by student finance.
Student finance don't fund masters
0
reply
Mathsz0r
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by jelly1000)
Student finance don't fund masters
I've been accepted for a 4 year course in Mathematics (MMath) at Nottingham, and was told it was completely funded by SF?
0
reply
Malmö
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
(Original post by ageshallnot)
Given the career choice you are considering, you might want to think about doing another subject at undergraduate level then a Master's in journalism.

Hi~ agreed, sorry. without wanting to pour cold water on your plans, journalism is one of the least useful degrees you can read.
It will *not* land you a job in the media. A good degree from a good uni in eng lit, philosophy, politics; something which demonstrates you have a good grasp of culture/ your intended subject area, & are capable of critical thought would be more suitable.

I live in london & know/ have met numerous journos; none did journalism or media studies. One, an art & classical music journalist, read music, then (i think) a law conversion course as he said a large % of it is tied up in legalities and it gave him an edge.
A woman i know who is a producer at the bbc read english, then did a bbc grad trainee scheme & worked her way up.
Journalism is incredibly tough; read a degree relevant to whichever *area* you want to cover, or do joint hons in philosophy & english or similar.
Philosophy will teach you dissemble someone's argument like a hot knife through butter! I did it at A level and its honestly the best thing i ever studied.

Anyway, chances are youll change your mind in the interim, so dont worry : )


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now? (select all that apply)

Lack of purpose or routine (142)
15.81%
Uncertainty around my education (146)
16.26%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (86)
9.58%
Isolating with family (61)
6.79%
Lack of support system (eg. Teachers, counsellors) (33)
3.67%
Lack of exercise/ability to be outside (79)
8.8%
Loneliness (90)
10.02%
Financial worries (38)
4.23%
Concern about myself or my loved ones getting ill (81)
9.02%
Exposure to negative news/social media (61)
6.79%
Lack of real life entertainment (eg. cinema, gigs, restaurants) (81)
9.02%

Watched Threads

View All