Turn on thread page Beta

AQA GCSE Chemistry C1 Exam 10th June 2014 watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    What do you think the best topics to revise for are? How do you revise? Do you think it will be as easy/hard as the biology paper?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i dont kknow im so scared !!! i dont know what to revise there is so much
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    The topics are pretty simple :cool:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I find it really hard to revise because there is so many different topics to remember. I just keep reading through my revision guide but I am just going to forget everything in the exam anyway.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bobby21231)
    I find it really hard to revise because there is so many different topics to remember. I just keep reading through my revision guide but I am just going to forget everything in the exam anyway.

    I'm sure you wont, just relax and don't over-revise
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Revise the more complex things that you may forget some points about
    -fractional distillation
    -polymers
    -bonding(ionic and covalent)
    -balancing equations(do examples too)
    - extracting and purifying of metals(electrolysis, photo mining, bio leeching etc)
    -emulsions and emulsifiers(margarine, hydrophilic, hydrophobic etc)


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Would somebody mind explaining the ionic/covalent bonding to me?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electrahearts)
    Would somebody mind explaining the ionic/covalent bonding to me?

    An ionic bond is between a metal and a non-metal and covalent bonding is between non-metals. With ionic bonding, it's all about stealing electrons and with covalent bonding its about sharing electrons. Hope that helped.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electrahearts)
    Would somebody mind explaining the ionic/covalent bonding to me?

    Ionic bonding: this is when metals and non metals react, the metal atoms lose the electrons in their outer shell to form positive charged ions and the non metal atoms gain these lost electrons to form negative charged ions, the oppositely charged ions are strongly attached together to form a compound (this type of compound is formed by giving/taking electrons)

    covalent bonding: this is when non-metals react with each other, the non-metal atoms keep on sharing the electrons in their outer shell with other atoms until they have full outer shell. These types of compounds are formed by atoms SHARING electrons

    thats all u need to know
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Why was wegners theory not accepted?
    Why couldn't scientists predict Earthquakes?
    And why didnt we know how life was first formed?
    Mega confused
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    1) Tectonic plates had not been discovered, so there wasnt an explanation of how the continents moved.

    2) Scientists cannot predict when tectonic plates will move, therefore they cannot predict earthquakes/volcanoes

    3) expand on this last question more?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muna-xo)
    Why was wegners theory not accepted?
    Why couldn't scientists predict Earthquakes?
    And why didnt we know how life was first formed?
    Mega confused

    1)Wegners theory wasn't accepted as he had used inaccurate data so he'd made some wild predictions and he wasn't even a prober geologist
    2) the tremors that are caused could be false alarms
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks guys! Much more clear now
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electrahearts)
    Thanks guys! Much more clear now
    You're welcome
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    If anyone wants some questions to try

    1) how do you test for a saturated fat or a saturated alkane

    2) how do you test for an unsaturated fat and what is the result

    3) how do you know If you need to extract something with carbon from its ore?

    4) Describe the process of bioleaching

    5) explain the process of phytomining- sorry for my spelling xD

    6) Describe the conditions needed for a polymerisation reaction to occur

    7) Name the test in how to crack hydrocarbon and what the catalyst would be

    8) Is it good to harden olive oil

    9) A nice one to end on.... EXPLAIN using kenetic theory why the average particle energy is reduced when a substance is heated .. such as water
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Billsonbubbles)
    If anyone wants some questions to try

    1) how do you test for a saturated fat or a saturated alkane

    2) how do you test for an unsaturated fat and what is the result

    3) how do you know If you need to extract something with carbon from its ore?

    4) Describe the process of bioleaching

    5) explain the process of phytomining- sorry for my spelling xD

    6) Describe the conditions needed for a polymerisation reaction to occur

    7) Name the test in how to crack hydrocarbon and what the catalyst would be

    8) Is it good to harden olive oil

    9) A nice one to end on.... EXPLAIN using kenetic theory why the average particle energy is reduced when a substance is heated .. such as water
    1) Bromine water, C=C decolourises it
    2) Same again? Not sure TBH, I thought bromine water would work
    3) You can extract all metals using electrolysis. If it's below carbon on the reactivity series you can also do a RedOx reaction
    4) damn... can't remember what bio-leaching involves- something about bacteria I guess?
    5) Phytomining is using growing plants to absorb minerals and then burning them and extracting from the ash

    Will do others in a bit
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lerjj)
    4) damn... can't remember what bio-leaching involves- something about bacteria I guess?
    Bioleaching is the use of bacteria to that absorb metal compounds (mainly copper). They then produce solutions called leachates that contain the compounds.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LancePereira)
    Bioleaching is the use of bacteria to that absorb metal compounds (mainly copper). They then produce solutions called leachates that contain the compounds.
    So how does that work? We locate that there's a fair amount of a mineral somewhere (but not enough to mine obviously), then we.... pump bacteria there? Or do you mine it but use bacteria to get the compounds out rather than blast furnaces/electrolysis? Never really learnt this (I know about phytomining though, so I was clearly there for the lesson...)
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lerjj)
    1) Bromine water, C=C decolourises it
    2) Same again? Not sure TBH, I thought bromine water would work
    3) You can extract all metals using electrolysis. If it's below carbon on the reactivity series you can also do a RedOx reaction
    4) damn... can't remember what bio-leaching involves- something about bacteria I guess?
    5) Phytomining is using growing plants to absorb minerals and then burning them and extracting from the ash

    Will do others in a bit
    2) would be the same test but instead of going COLOURLESS IT STAYS THE SAME COLOUR IN THE SPEC IT SAYS IT STAYS ORANGE

    4) it is where bacteria feed on a low grade ore, and turn it into a higher grade solution of the metal/ ore

    5) correct but they normal extract copper as it is low reserves and ok

    well done the others are correct as I can see thanks for doing the questions
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Billsonbubbles)
    2) would be the same test but instead of going COLOURLESS IT STAYS THE SAME COLOUR IN THE SPEC IT SAYS IT STAYS ORANGE

    4) it is where bacteria feed on a low grade ore, and turn it into a higher grade solution of the metal/ ore

    5) correct but they normal extract copper as it is low reserves and ok

    well done the others are correct as I can see thanks for doing the questions
    2) So how do you tell it apart from saturated fats? If neither decolourise it then it's not a very good test

    4) Thanks! Makes sense

    5) Didn't know this was copper specific, I think it's being done with some other metals as well (maybe experimentally atm?) But yeah, price of copper is going up so it's a good example for both bio-l and phyto-m.

    You turn!

    1) Give an advantage of forming ethanol through fermentation

    2) Give an advantage of forming ethanol through the hydration of a hydrocarbon, and name the hydrocarbon.

    3) Who was Wegener?

    4) Why is aluminium more expensive than iron (for this assume that Al is either more or equally abundant as Fe, which I think is true)
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 5, 2014

University open days

  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Exeter Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • University of Bradford
    Faculty of Health Studies Postgraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
Poll
Do protests make a difference in political decisions?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.