If we set foot on another planet, would we die instantaneously? Watch

Scrawt
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Our immune systems have evolved over millions of years to fight pathogens on Earth. So even if we were to walk on a planet with a breathable atmosphere, right temperature and climate, would our immune system be invaded with foreign microscopic pathogens which inhibit it, as it hasn't evolved mechanisms to fight against them? So although this new world might look seemingly Earth like to our eyes, there could, or most likely, will be deadly pathogens in its atmosphere?

Is this true?
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AwkwardLemur
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why don't you go and find out
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Maid Marian
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:ditto:
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Carterj09
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Depends what planet
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Scrawt
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(Original post by Carterj09)
Depends what planet
I'm talking about any planet since each and every planet will have developed independently from one another, and so the life on one will differ from another, but will it differ enough to overwhelm our immune system and kill us?
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Dez
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The pathogens wouldn't have any experience of fighting us, either. :dontknow:
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Carterj09
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(Original post by Scrawt)
I'm talking about any planet since each and every planet will have developed independently from one another, and so the life on one will differ from another, but will it differ enough to overwhelm our immune system and kill us?
Well most, 99% would kill you within 10 seconds, the rest a few days.
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Scrawt
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(Original post by Dez)
The pathogens wouldn't have any experience of fighting us, either. :dontknow:
What do you mean? So it works both ways? I didn't know this. I thought pathogens fight anything. :confused:
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alow
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(Original post by Scrawt)
I'm talking about any planet since each and every planet will have developed independently from one another, and so the life on one will differ from another, but will it differ enough to overwhelm our immune system and kill us?
Short answer: almost definitely not. It would be very unlikely that the pathogens on another planet (assuming there is life at all) would be able to infect a human. Plus it wouldn't be instantly, there is no way a microorganism could kill you instantly.
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by Scrawt)
Our immune systems have evolved over millions of years to fight pathogens on Earth. So even if we were to walk on a planet with a breathable atmosphere, right temperature and climate, would our immune system be invaded with foreign microscopic pathogens which inhibit it, as it hasn't evolved mechanisms to fight against them? So although this new world might look seemingly Earth like to our eyes, there could, or most likely, will be deadly pathogens in its atmosphere?

Is this true?
Firstly, that obviously depends on whether or not the planet has life or not. If there's no life, there obviously aren't going to be any foreign pathogens. Secondly, whilst I'm not a biologist, my guess is that 'alien' microorganisms would be harmless since they're not adapted to affect our biology. You've got to remember that pathogens are only pathogens because they're adapted to harm specific biological systems and cells and since they will never have come across earth-based biology, I wouldn't imagine they'd be able to harm us.

If we did ever get technologically advanced enough to get to another planet with life, then I'm sure we'd be technologically enough to make sure that the planet is safe for human life first.
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Scrawt
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(Original post by alow)
Short answer: almost definitely not. It would be very unlikely that the pathogens on another planet (assuming there is life at all) would be able to infect a human. Plus it wouldn't be instantly, there is no way a microorganism could kill you instantly.
What about any other kind of microbe? bacteria, virus or fungus?
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donutellme
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Probably not. It'll take a few days at least, during which your immune system will try to create antibodies to fight the new pathogens (the same way it does with anything else). However, if the new pathogens are completely different from what we've encountered before (as in not antigens or anything), then it's most likely you'll die in a few hours/days.
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Dez
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(Original post by Scrawt)
What do you mean? So it works both ways? I didn't know this. I thought pathogens fight anything. :confused:
You know what the "H" stands for in HIV right? Not all diseases affect all species, even on Earth. Though some otherworldly disease could, with enough time and exposure, learn to infect humans it most likely wouldn't be instant. But it wouldn't matter since the water and food would certainly be deadly poisonous to us, with or without bacteria in it.
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Scrawt
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Firstly, that obviously depends on whether or not the planet has life or not. If there's no life, there obviously aren't going to be any foreign pathogens. Secondly, whilst I'm not a biologist, my guess is that 'alien' microorganisms would be harmless since they're not adapted to affect our biology. You've got to remember that pathogens are only pathogens because they're adapted to harm specific biological systems and cells and since they will never have come across earth-based biology, I wouldn't imagine they'd be able to harm us.

If we did ever get technologically advanced enough to get to another planet with life, then I'm sure we'd be technologically enough to make sure that the planet is safe for human life first.
So does that apply to all kinds of stuff which could kill us, like bacteria, microbes, fungi and disease etc?
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Scrawt
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(Original post by Dez)
You know what the "H" stands for in HIV right? Not all diseases affect all species, even on Earth. Though some otherworldly disease could, with enough time and exposure, learn to infect humans it most likely wouldn't be instant. But it wouldn't matter since the water and food would certainly be deadly poisonous to us, with or without bacteria in it.
Why would the water be poisonous to us? Since water is a very simple chemical substance. Two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom?
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by Scrawt)
So does that apply to all kinds of stuff which could kill us, like bacteria, microbes, fungi and disease etc?
You're assuming that these different categories of life exist on a different planet! Who's to say that life hasn't taken a completely different evolutionary pathway? But yes, unless life has evolved in an extremely similar manner to earth, my guess is that it wouldn't be harmful. But obviously, the only way we'd know for certain is by observing those lifeforms in the first place and if humans ever did settle on another planet, we'd definitely send in probes first to make sure it's safe.
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Dez
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(Original post by Scrawt)
Why would the water be poisonous to us? Since water is a very simple chemical substance. Two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom?
The water we drink, from taps and so on, has far more than that in it. Bits of calcium, iron and various other vitamins and minerals are always there in trace amounts. That goes for pretty much all drinking water on Earth, hence we've built up a tolerance to it and don't even notice it (in many cases, these minerals are in fact beneficial to us). However, the water on a different planet would probably contain different minerals, ones that could well be toxic to us. And anything in the water supply will make its way through the food chain, meaning we couldn't eat or drink anything on this foreign planet without becoming badly ill. Kinda like Delhi I suppose.
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alow
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(Original post by Scrawt)
What about any other kind of microbe? bacteria, virus or fungus?
On another planet there would be no selection pressure favouring organisms that can infect humans. It's extremely unlikely they would harm a human whatsoever as up until the point on contact there is no advantage to being able to do so.

Also, the type of life on another planet (assuming there is any life at all) is very likely to be vastly different to that on Earth (unless we brought it there or we have common ancestors -which some scientists hypothesise we could have with any organisms on Mars, as there are mechanisms for transfer of biological material between the Earth and Mars in the early solar system-)
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Magistl
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I've actually looked into this in-depth, and I've found that while we've spent millions of years adapting to these microbes, bacteria's and much more: it wouldn't instantly kill us, no, we'd more than likely develop an immunity to these after our immune system has finished fighting it off. Naturally, you'd feel extremely ill for the first few weeks if it's bad, but I doubt we'd die, it's why Human's survive: we're able to adapt quick enough

This is not including eating a different planets food/drinking water, I'm not actually entirely sure on that. I'd imagine it would be (as an individual stated) like drinking dirty water to us: it'd be partially poisonous, but I don't see why we wouldn't have a filter present if we were to get to another planet.
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BlueSam3
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It's entirely possible for it to be too different to be able to touch us. As much as our immune system has evolved to deal with pathogens on earth, those pathogens have evolved to be able to infect us. There's no particular reason for whatever alien pathogens we find to be similar enough to be able to infect us, unless by some chance they happen to say, produce a waste product that is poisonous to us.
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