Lamalam
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Why am I wrong in these questions?

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krisshP
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(Original post by Lamalam)
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Why am I wrong in these questions?

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Q3-Not sure

Q7-
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...226&p=48181299

Krishna
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interstitial
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3. Gravity is the weakest fundamental force.

7. It's artificial, not natural background radiation. Bit of a strange question though TBH.
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Lamalam
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So only NAtural background radiation is counted ! Thanks!

May I ask one more question?

When using standard candle , the distance calculated is actually the distance of the standard candle . But how can I use this distance to estimate distance of other stars?

Thank you

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krisshP
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(Original post by Arithmeticae)
3. Gravity is the weakest fundamental force.
Then why are protons locked in nucleus then? Wouldn't they all come out due to repulsion? Or is it due to the strong nuclear force thingy?

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(Original post by krisshP)
Then why are protons locked in nucleus then? Wouldn't they all come out due to repulsion? Or is it due to the strong nuclear force thingy?

Thanks
Yeah, exactly. At a certain distance, the repulsive force is overcome by the strong nuclear force (that's why it's the STRONG force, it's much stronger than the other forces ) but it only takes effect at extremely short distances.
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addylad
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(Original post by Lamalam)
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Why am I wrong in these questions?

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Microwave ovens are sources of background radiation, even if it is artificial. The wording of the question is very poor.
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Checking on Wikipedia, it seems to also say that artificial items (in particular, consumer items) can still be sources of background radiation T_T.
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addylad
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(Original post by Arithmeticae)
Checking on Wikipedia, it seems to also say that artificial items (in particular, consumer items) can still be sources of background radiation T_T.
Yeah, I suppose there are different definitions of what constitutes background radiation. You can see what the question is getting at with the possible answers, but it's somewhat ambiguous.
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krisshP
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(Original post by Arithmeticae)
Yeah, exactly. At a certain distance, the repulsive force is overcome by the strong nuclear force (that's why it's the STRONG force, it's much stronger than the other forces ) but it only takes effect at extremely short distances.
Ok, makes sense.

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Krishna
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krisshP
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(Original post by Lamalam)
When using standard candle , the distance calculated is actually the distance of the standard candle . But how can I use this distance to estimate distance of other stars?
We get the distance to NEIGHBOUR stars which are close to the standard candle.
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Jaydude
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(Original post by krisshP)
We get the distance to NEIGHBOUR stars which are close to the standard candle.
Don't astronomers compare flux reached here on earth from the observed star, compare it to standard candle to determine luminosity of the observed star. Then apply inverse square law to get D???


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krisshP
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(Original post by Jaydude)
Don't astronomers compare flux reached here on earth from the observed star, compare it to standard candle to determine luminosity of the observed star. Then apply inverse square law to get D???


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Don't know, you seem right though
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