Should there be less people going to university?

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Jess_1324
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So exams have been made much harder this year. I'm sure the government have lots of reasons for this but I think the main reason was to fix the grade inflation, too many people getting As and Bs.

Not sure if the government wanted less people to get into the top unis or just wanted less people going to uni all together.

I personally don't think less people should go, but only because i think there isn't great help for those who just finished a levels. Uni isn't for everyone but if the government want people to go into work straight away I think they should improve apprenticeships

Do you are think less people should go to uni?
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Maker
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(Original post by Jess_1324)
So exams have been made much harder this year. I'm sure the government have lots of reasons for this but I think the main reason was to fix the grade inflation, too many people getting As and Bs.

Not sure if the government wanted less people to get into the top unis or just wanted less people going to uni all together.

I personally don't think less people should go, but only because i think there isn't great help for those who just finished a levels. Uni isn't for everyone but if the government want people to go into work straight away I think they should improve apprenticeships

Do you are think less people should go to uni?
Its "fewer", not "less".
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Stony Owner
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Maker got there first with the "fewer" thing (only reason I opened this thread). And I can't even rep because I rep way too much and it won't let me (can somebody fix that whole "can't rep all the time" thing please?). Ok I'm out now.
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Maker
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(Original post by Stony Owner)
Maker got there first with the "fewer" thing (only reason I opened this thread). And I can't even rep because I rep way too much and it won't let me (can somebody fix that whole "can't rep all the time" thing please?). Ok I'm out now.
I try not to be a grammar pedant but the post was about the quality of university candidates so really needed to be of a high grammatical standard which it was not.
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Jess_1324
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(Original post by Maker)
I try not to be a grammar pedant but the post was about the quality of university candidates so really needed to be of a high grammatical standard which it was not.
Whoops sorry, grammar has never been a strong point of mine
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Maker
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(Original post by Jess_1324)
Whoops sorry, grammar has never been a strong point of mine
Sorry about that. I do agree with your point. I think a lot of people go to uni because they want to leave home and have a good time without really thinking about if its really suitable for them. Unis see it as easy money. TAs are cheap and they teach a lot of UGs.

Apprenticeships are a much abused name and a lot of people are rightly wary of signing up to a job that pays below minimum wage and results in a mickey mouse scrap of paper.
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Smack
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Increasing the difficulty of exams does not necessarily mean that the government wants fewer people to attend university. Rather, I think it's a means of combating grade inflation, where an increasingly large amount of students appear to be clustered towards the upper range, to create a more even distribution, and hence making it easier for universities to discern talent.

It's easy to say that there should be fewer people attending university and more people entering the workforce straight after leaving school/college, but industry itself seems to disagree, given how many jobs now require degrees at a bare minimum. The world isn't exactly a sea of opportunity for today's school leavers.

If industry wanted more apprenticeships, it would recruit more, and school leavers wouldn't be faced with such bleak opportunities compared to graduates. Instead, outside of the traditionally strong areas for apprenticeships, e.g. engineering and manufacturing, they're largely seen as a scam, as a means to pay people far below the minimum wage to perform basic jobs with little career progression.

We don't need to go all Daily Mail about this. We don't need to listen to sound-bites about how great apprenticeships are and exaggerated figures about graduate unemployment. We need to pay close attention to what is actually happening and what the real facts and figures are.
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Daftpunker
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(Original post by Smack)
Increasing the difficulty of exams does not necessarily mean that the government wants fewer people to attend university. Rather, I think it's a means of combating grade inflation, where an increasingly large amount of students appear to be clustered towards the upper range, to create a more even distribution, and hence making it easier for universities to discern talent.

It's easy to say that there should be fewer people attending university and more people entering the workforce straight after leaving school/college, but industry itself seems to disagree, given how many jobs now require degrees at a bare minimum. The world isn't exactly a sea of opportunity for today's school leavers.

If industry wanted more apprenticeships, it would recruit more, and school leavers wouldn't be faced with such bleak opportunities compared to graduates. Instead, outside of the traditionally strong areas for apprenticeships, e.g. engineering and manufacturing, they're largely seen as a scam, as a means to pay people far below the minimum wage to perform basic jobs with little career progression.

We don't need to go all Daily Mail about this. We don't need to listen to sound-bites about how great apprenticeships are and exaggerated figures about graduate unemployment. We need to pay close attention to what is actually happening and what the real facts and figures are.
As far as I'm aware the facts and figures are 45% of people that go to uni under the current loan system will never pay back the full amount as they will not have a job that pays over £21,000 for the requried 30 years.

Also in my part of the country (south-east) 60% of school leavers will go to uni.
14% of the jobs a degree is seen as essential.

That rather says it all about the thread title.
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Smack
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(Original post by Daftpunker)
As far as I'm aware the facts and figures are 45% of people that go to uni under the current loan system will never pay back the full amount as they will not have a job that pays over £21,000 for the requried 30 years.
I think it's quite difficult to predict that, although certainly large amounts of graduates today won't achieve high paying careers that enables them to quickly pay off their student loan.

Also in my part of the country (south-east) 60% of school leavers will go to uni.
14% of the jobs a degree is seen as essential.
Seen as essential to perform the job, or an essential requirement to be recruited?
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Daftpunker
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(Original post by Smack)
I think it's quite difficult to predict that, although certainly large amounts of graduates today won't achieve high paying careers that enables them to quickly pay off their student loan.



Seen as essential to perform the job, or an essential requirement to be recruited?
That article came from the Guardian I believe. I agree though it does seem a wide estimation as opposed to thought out logic .

The 14% is jobs that you literally can't do if you don't have a degree. Teaching, Lawyer, Doctor etc. Also (picking holes in my own point!) the figure is 60% of school leavers will go to uni...but not necessarily graduate.

Also your comment on bleak oppotunites - I now work for a big player in the financial industry and 12 individuals have just finished a 6 week intense work experience program designed to build contacts and deepen the understanding of the industry. The cost of the program to the individual was £400.

These individuals were not 16 year old school leavers. These individuals were graduates who were 23/24 and were willing to pay the company to let them come in and work for free basically.

I will add as well that I am 24 now and have a degree but the people in my area that seem to be in the best position financially, socially and career-wise left school at 16/18. Who knows where we will all be at 30 though.

I am not anti-uni or people going to uni but I despise that the education system literally conscripts people to a way of thinking that unless you go to uni you've failed at school and their is little to no hope to achieve in this world unless you've been to uni.

I feel this message is sold to people not to benefit our young people but so schools can say "look how great we are 95% of our school leavers go to uni"

I also ask you Smack...I know people that have managed to get into university on grades as low as CCD.

Do you really think this is a good thing for the individual, society and a good reflection on universities today?
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