Was this a panic attack?

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anon422
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Basically today I had a free lesson and was sat with some friends, and a friend started telling a story about how this guy's mum ran over a sack of rabbits... Sometimes my brain is weird and I get overly emotional about smth, so after he told the story I was like wow im going to cry, so slowly I started crying and I was laughing bc I was crying about it when it wasn't /that/ sad..

Anyway, suddenly I started like heavily and quickly breathing (hyperventilating?) and I began properly crying, and my friend was saying 'can you breath?' and then I was like high pitched gasping/breathing and crying, and shaking... Then at some point I randomly felt like light headed or my legs went tingly or smth

A friend got the teacher who was sat near us to come over and she asked if I could walk, then they walked me into the office (at this point my breathing was going back to normal and we sat down, + after a bit she asked me what had made me so upset (but it wasn't something that had made me so upset, idk what caused it)... Anyway I sat in there till I stopped crying/shaking and then went back and sat down.

Could this have been a panic attack? I've never had one before but when I sat back down I was like 'what even..' and someone said panic attack and asked if I'd had them before... I've just finished my exams today, but didnt feel stressed during them for some reason, a friend suggested that id been subconsciously supressing the stress and that caused it..?

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Rum Ham
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Yes that sounds exactly like a panic attack. Sounds a lot similar to how my first one started too. Mine happened in college after my exams were over a few days before so I wasn't as stressed as I was a few weeks before but while sitting in class one day minding my own business...BOOM it hit me - a full blown panic attack. I never knew was it was but it scared the crap out of me and it took me a while to realise that it was a panic attack. I was convinced I was ill or drugged or something just because it happened when I wasn't mega stressed and came on me totally out of the blue.

The thing to remember is, no matter how horrible and real the symptoms feel, a panic attack can never hurt you.
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Stony Owner
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(Original post by anon422)
a friend suggested that id been subconsciously supressing the stress and that caused it..?
Maybe but beware of friend psychologists take what they say with a grain of salt!
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
Yes that sounds exactly like a panic attack. Sounds a lot similar to how my first one started too. Mine happened in college after my exams were over a few days before so I wasn't as stressed as I was a few weeks before but while sitting in class one day minding my own business...BOOM it hit me - a full blown panic attack. I never knew was it was but it scared the crap out of me and it took me a while to realise that it was a panic attack. I was convinced I was ill or drugged or something just because it happened when I wasn't mega stressed and came on me totally out of the blue.

The thing to remember is, no matter how horrible and real the symptoms feel, a panic attack can never hurt you.
what happened during yours?
any idea what triggered it? and what triggers them now for you?

thank you for the answer
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anon422
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(Original post by Stony Owner)
Maybe but beware of friend psychologists take what they say with a grain of salt!
that is true, ty
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(Original post by anon422)
what happened during yours?
any idea what triggered it? and what triggers them now for you?

thank you for the answer
I was just sitting there reading my book and I was feeling fine and then suddenly the room started spinning, my chest was tight and I felt like I couldn't breathe and I started taking a hot flush. I ran out of the classroom and went to the toilet. I felt better about 2 mins after being out of the room but I was still on edge for the rest of the day because I had never experienced that before.

I have no idea what caused mine that time as like I said, my exams were over with at that point and I wasn't stressed during the time it happened. Most of the time though you'll hear people who have had a panic attack say they came on out the blue and they couldn't work out why they got them.

I developed panic disorder and got panic attacks daily - this was a while after my first one and I actually was stressed when I developed this, and everything set off an attack for me. Now, I still get them every now and again but they are never major. Most of the time I get them, its when I am in the car or on public transport. I think its because I can't just get out the car when I have a panic when we were in the middle of a motorway or I can't magically stop and get out of the train when its moving. What mainly makes me panic though is the fear of panic if that makes sense? Like I used to be scared of going out in public in case I took a panic attack and looked stupid in front of people and embarrassed myself. I'm a lot better now though and I'm fine with crowds, going to town etc now

If you have an odd panic attack here and there, its nothing to worry about. Most people get them occasionally. Its only if they become regular and they affect your life, say you lose confidence because of them or you become housebound, that you have to worry. Most likely this was just a once off thing for you

Was it warm where you are today or had you not eaten for a while? Heat and low blood sugar can cause panic attacks. So can caffeine.
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I had a panic attack today, I got upset at work and had to call my mum.
Basically, something small (or big in this case) can set me off and then I suddenly get flooded with bad thoughts about how all the things I do wrong so I must be worthless (stuff like a spelling test when I was 5, it's really stupid if you actually think about it).
Sometimes I can suppress the thoughts, usually with music, but a lot of the time I need to be talked down - someone has to look after me until I get over the worst and then talk me out the other end.

But it's pretty much exactly how you described it.
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
I was just sitting there reading my book and I was feeling fine and then suddenly the room started spinning, my chest was tight and I felt like I couldn't breathe and I started taking a hot flush. I ran out of the classroom and went to the toilet. I felt better about 2 mins after being out of the room but I was still on edge for the rest of the day because I had never experienced that before.

I have no idea what caused mine that time as like I said, my exams were over with at that point and I wasn't stressed during the time it happened. Most of the time though you'll hear people who have had a panic attack say they came on out the blue and they couldn't work out why they got them.

I developed panic disorder and got panic attacks daily - this was a while after my first one and I actually was stressed when I developed this, and everything set off an attack for me. Now, I still get them every now and again but they are never major. Most of the time I get them, its when I am in the car or on public transport. I think its because I can't just get out the car when I have a panic when we were in the middle of a motorway or I can't magically stop and get out of the train when its moving. What mainly makes me panic though is the fear of panic if that makes sense? Like I used to be scared of going out in public in case I took a panic attack and looked stupid in front of people and embarrassed myself. I'm a lot better now though and I'm fine with crowds, going to town etc now

If you have an odd panic attack here and there, its nothing to worry about. Most people get them occasionally. Its only if they become regular and they affect your life, say you lose confidence because of them or you become housebound, that you have to worry. Most likely this was just a once off thing for you

Was it warm where you are today or had you not eaten for a while? Heat and low blood sugar can cause panic attacks. So can caffeine.
Strange getting them supposedly 'out of the blue' when our bodies' must have a reason for it...
Glad you're getting them less now - how long did/do they last for you?
I understand the transport thing, and also the fear of panic, i reckon it'd be scarier if it happened whilst home alone or something because there'd be no-one to help. I'd only be embarrassed if it was in public and no-one helped me, because then i'd just feel so judged... but yes, hopefully it won't happen again.

It was rainy today, i had eaten/drank but hadn't had caffeine...
Weird thing is, during lunch i had watched a 22-minute-long video by Zoella (youtube) on anxiety and panic attacks, which i didn't know much about (panic attacks) beforehand - it's so weird, like is that a big coincidence or what? at least i had been educated a little on them beforehand haha

(am still not really sure if it was a panic attack though, but not sure what else it could have been iygm)
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anon422
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I had a panic attack today, I got upset at work and had to call my mum.
Basically, something small (or big in this case) can set me off and then I suddenly get flooded with bad thoughts about how all the things I do wrong so I must be worthless (stuff like a spelling test when I was 5, it's really stupid if you actually think about it).
Sometimes I can suppress the thoughts, usually with music, but a lot of the time I need to be talked down - someone has to look after me until I get over the worst and then talk me out the other end.

But it's pretty much exactly how you described it.
How long have you had them for, and what triggered your first one?
What are your symptoms?

Thank you
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(Original post by anon422)
Strange getting them supposedly 'out of the blue' when our bodies' must have a reason for it...
Glad you're getting them less now - how long did/do they last for you?
I understand the transport thing, and also the fear of panic, i reckon it'd be scarier if it happened whilst home alone or something because there'd be no-one to help. I'd only be embarrassed if it was in public and no-one helped me, because then i'd just feel so judged... but yes, hopefully it won't happen again.

It was rainy today, i had eaten/drank but hadn't had caffeine...
Weird thing is, during lunch i had watched a 22-minute-long video by Zoella (youtube) on anxiety and panic attacks, which i didn't know much about (panic attacks) beforehand - it's so weird, like is that a big coincidence or what? at least i had been educated a little on them beforehand haha
I have saw that Zoella vid you are talking about. I watched it when I was at my worst and it really helped me. Knowing that people get them and have the exact same panic symptoms you get and you see that they are dealing with them really helps

Panic attacks used to last about half an hour with me when I was at my worst and maybe just a few mins they last for now. I had a bad one in the car yesterday which last about 20 mins since I had been driving from Edinburgh and it was a long journey but I reminded myself that it was only a panic and it slowly went away. I don't tend to get them much at home now. Maybe an odd one every so often but I find it easier to get rid of when I'm at home, regardless of whether I'm home alone.
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
I have saw that Zoella vid you are talking about. I watched it when I was at my worst and it really helped me. Knowing that people get them and have the exact same panic symptoms you get and you see that they are dealing with them really helps

Panic attacks used to last about half an hour with me when I was at my worst and maybe just a few mins they last for now. I had a bad one in the car yesterday which last about 20 mins since I had been driving from Edinburgh and it was a long journey but I reminded myself that it was only a panic and it slowly went away. I don't tend to get them much at home now. Maybe an odd one every so often but I find it easier to get rid of when I'm at home, regardless of whether I'm home alone.
You probably saw the first vid she made, i haven't seen that - just the one she posted today or yesterday

What caused the improvements (like less frequent, shorter etc) in the panic disorder? That's good.

Sorry for all the questions, im interested in this type of thing (mental health etc)
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(Original post by anon422)
How long have you had them for, and what triggered your first one?
What are your symptoms?

Thank you
Since I was 15, I'm 22.
First one was triggered by something small as a result of something big, if that makes sense. I was attacked at school by a girl and I ended up taking about 6 days off school (obviously). I started waiting in the reception area before I went into school because I didn't want to go to class when there were people around and I would wait until the first lesson had started (registering at reception instead of at registration). I don't even think it was my first day back, I think it was about the third when all of a sudden there was a very long queue of latercomers registering because they'd missed the gates.
Then it started like it normally does, a feeling in the pit of my stomach that makes me feel sick, followed by a general feeling of unease, leading to tears and gasping for breath. They ended up pulling me into the deputy head's office and calling my mum to come get me, and I'm not kidding in the middle of my panic attack I yelled that I couldn't go home because I had already taken too much time off school and my exams were nearing (it was like February before my GCSEs or something).
I knew it was stupid, but I couldn't stop. I'm the same now. I'll forget to put my jewelery on in the morning and I'll feel it start (counselling really helped me to learn to recognise when it was starting and stop it before it reached what I now call 'the point of no return'.

I didn't have one for like 18 months and then just one in the next 12 when in uni, before third year stress got to me.

Nowadays, when I make a mistake at work, my boss doesn't just mention it once, he'll repeat the same disapproving comments 5 or 6 times, so it's really not helpful for keeping them at bay.
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(Original post by anon422)
You probably saw the first vid she made, i haven't seen that - just the one she posted today or yesterday

What caused the improvements (like less frequent, shorter etc) in the panic disorder? That's good.

Sorry for all the questions, im interested in this type of thing (mental health etc)
Oh I didn't know she made a more recent one, I'll check it out after I've replied to you here's the one of hers I watched. It was uploaded a yr ago. - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-iNOFD27G4


Well when I was at my worst I was housebound and docs tried me on citalopram (anti-depressant) and valium but I took a reaction to the antidepressant and valium actually made me more panicky which was a shock! So I decided, stuff it I'm fixing this on my own! So I made a 'challenge chart' and wrote down things I was scared to do like going into town, going on buses etc and I forced myself to do all these things at least 5 times in one month. The first few times I done everything, I was utterly terrified and clutching at my bf's arm for dear life but after the 3rd/4th time doing everything, it felt natural and I didn't panic and now I don't panic doing any of those things, other than maybe a little panic here and there I didn't feel comfortable taking meds for something that is pretty much caused by the way I think. I have my challenge chart up on my wall so whenever I feel like crap, I just look at that and remember I beat the panic myself.

Yesterday I done Race for Life which involved me travelling 80 miles to Edinburgh and being in a crowd of over 3000 people. If you told me I would have been in a car for that long or been in a crowd that big, I would have slapped you for being so absurd lol but I done it and never panicked once

Haha no bother. Happy to answer any of your questions I was interested in mental health too before I got panic disorder.
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anon422
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Since I was 15, I'm 22.
First one was triggered by something small as a result of something big, if that makes sense. I was attacked at school by a girl and I ended up taking about 6 days off school (obviously). I started waiting in the reception area before I went into school because I didn't want to go to class when there were people around and I would wait until the first lesson had started (registering at reception instead of at registration). I don't even think it was my first day back, I think it was about the third when all of a sudden there was a very long queue of latercomers registering because they'd missed the gates.
Then it started like it normally does, a feeling in the pit of my stomach that makes me feel sick, followed by a general feeling of unease, leading to tears and gasping for breath. They ended up pulling me into the deputy head's office and calling my mum to come get me, and I'm not kidding in the middle of my panic attack I yelled that I couldn't go home because I had already taken too much time off school and my exams were nearing (it was like February before my GCSEs or something).
I knew it was stupid, but I couldn't stop. I'm the same now. I'll forget to put my jewelery on in the morning and I'll feel it start (counselling really helped me to learn to recognise when it was starting and stop it before it reached what I now call 'the point of no return'.

I didn't have one for like 18 months and then just one in the next 12 when in uni, before third year stress got to me.

Nowadays, when I make a mistake at work, my boss doesn't just mention it once, he'll repeat the same disapproving comments 5 or 6 times, so it's really not helpful for keeping them at bay.
Awh, that sounds awful how did you know/when did you find out it was a panic attack?
glad the counselling has helped - where do you work? what degree did you do? I can imagine that is v unhelpful of your boss haha :/
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
Oh I didn't know she made a more recent one, I'll check it out after I've replied to you here's the one of hers I watched. It was uploaded a yr ago. - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-iNOFD27G4


Well when I was at my worst I was housebound and docs tried me on citalopram (anti-depressant) and valium but I took a reaction to the antidepressant and valium actually made me more panicky which was a shock! So I decided, stuff it I'm fixing this on my own! So I made a 'challenge chart' and wrote down things I was scared to do like going into town, going on buses etc and I forced myself to do all these things at least 5 times in one month. The first few times I done everything, I was utterly terrified and clutching at my bf's arm for dear life but after the 3rd/4th time doing everything, it felt natural and I didn't panic and now I don't panic doing any of those things, other than maybe a little panic here and there I didn't feel comfortable taking meds for something that is pretty much caused by the way I think. I have my challenge chart up on my wall so whenever I feel like crap, I just look at that and remember I beat the panic myself.

Yesterday I done Race for Life which involved me travelling 80 miles to Edinburgh and being in a crowd of over 3000 people. If you told me I would have been in a car for that long or been in a crowd that big, I would have slapped you for being so absurd lol but I done it and never panicked once

Haha no bother. Happy to answer any of your questions I was interested in mental health too before I got panic disorder.
Thank you, i will watch that in a min

what's valium? that's ironic haha...

That's good that you overcame it yourself - well done haha

Oooh that sounds good, fab

And thank you... if you don't mind me asking, how old are you and what are you doing atm (job/education wise)?
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(Original post by anon422)
Thank you, i will watch that in a min

what's valium? that's ironic haha...

That's good that you overcame it yourself - well done haha

Oooh that sounds good, fab

And thank you... if you don't mind me asking, how old are you and what are you doing atm (job/education wise)?
Valium is a muscle relaxant. Its also called diazepam. I got given it to calm me down and also for back spasms as when I was panicking, the muscles in my upper back would stay constantly clenched and I would be in agony.

I'm 21 now and my panics started at 19 and I'm a student. I'm studying my degree (Bsc Hons Biology) with The Open Uni as my panics prevented me from going to a brick uni after college but I'm loving my course and uni
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
Valium is a muscle relaxant. Its also called diazepam. I got given it to calm me down and also for back spasms as when I was panicking, the muscles in my upper back would stay constantly clenched and I would be in agony.

I'm 21 now and my panics started at 19 and I'm a student. I'm studying my degree (Bsc Hons Biology) with The Open Uni as my panics prevented me from going to a brick uni after college but I'm loving my course and uni
Ah right. And coool, i do biology a level but find it a bit boring :/ what does 'brick' uni mean?
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(Original post by anon422)
Ah right. And coool, i do biology a level but find it a bit boring :/ what does 'brick' uni mean?
It just another word for a conventional, typical normal uni that is made out of bricks and water as opposed to distance learning unis such as The Open Uni where you do the learning online or at home instead of in an actual building
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anon422
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(Original post by Yasmin25)
It just another word for a conventional, typical normal uni that is made out of bricks and water as opposed to distance learning unis such as The Open Uni where you do the learning online or at home instead of in an actual building
Ahhh, that's interesting
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(Original post by anon422)
Awh, that sounds awful how did you know/when did you find out it was a panic attack?
glad the counselling has helped - where do you work? what degree did you do? I can imagine that is v unhelpful of your boss haha :/
My mum had suffered with them in the past, she said that's what it sounded like. When I had more I discovered that must be what it was.
The counselling did help, I couldn't think about any specifics for so long and then my counsellor just told me to pinpoint it, so then I can recognise it before it's full blown and at least attempt to do something about it. She was quite demanding actually, but in a good way, and it did help.
I work as an office manager for a small business, but the boss seems to think 'office manager' means 'do all of the work required in the office as well as supervising the staff both in and out' so I get a bit stressed. He also doesn't know about my mental health history, hence the anonymous.
Funnily enough, I studied psychology
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