Obese people should pay more Tax

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LIT10106536
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i'm not bashing obese people but

They should be given a target amount of weight to lose each month and
if they don't lose it tax them more.

Money is the greatest to motivation anybody

no matter what they say.

They are lowering there quality of life for being obese anyway
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Dat Dere
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Alternatively, make them exercise for their food. In my mind, I see fat people on big hamster wheels in supermarkets with 2 miles to go before they can take home their shopping :yep:
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DaftPunk327
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I guess it depends why they're obese and how feasible it is for them to loose weight by themselves.
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Sanctimonious
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How are they lowering their quality of life? There are numerous obese celebrities who are probably enjoying a better quality of life than a lot of us. Quality of life is determined by many more factors than someone's weight.

Obese people should be encouraged through a modern and progressive education system to make healthy choices, partake in more exercise and how to budget effectively when shopping for healthier alternatives. They should also be made aware of the risks of smoking, eating foods with so many additives and so forth - this should be compulsory for everyone in school. Only through education will we change the way people think and see things. When the market demands healthier foods businesses will have no option but to cater to that demand on mass or face losing profits.

As it stands there are many obstacles to people making healthy choices:

1) healthier food is more expensive compared to supermarket junk food
2) Fast food restaurants are allowed to prop up anywhere and everywhere
3) In some areas of the UK there are a lack of areas and commitment to sport and exercise
4) A lot of people are so stressed they don't take the time to cook and have quick fix meals between work commitments
5) We have a nation that likes to binge drink en mass - empty calories being consumed for fun
6) We live in a society that is fine with sedentary lifestyles - televisions, games consoles, etc.

There are numerous other reasons too.

It is far more relevant to the modern world than other subjects. The curriculum in the UK would benefit from some changes. Knowledge is power and educated people make better decisions.

You seem to be of the opinion we should offer incentives. I'm of the opinion we should tackle the root causes.
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M1011
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
i'm not bashing obese people but

They should be given a target amount of weight to lose each month and
if they don't lose it tax them more.

Money is the greatest to motivation anybody

no matter what they say.

They are lowering there quality of life for being obese anyway
Same could be said for stupid people.

Maybe people should be forced to learn the difference between "there" and "their", along with simple sentence structures. If they fail, they should be taxed more.

Seems fair, after all they're lowering the quality of life for the people who read their ramblings?
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C=N-R
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
i'm not bashing obese people but

They should be given a target amount of weight to lose each month and
if they don't lose it tax them more.

Money is the greatest to motivation anybody

no matter what they say.

They are lowering there quality of life for being obese anyway
What about people who suffer from medical conditions that result in weight gain, should they be taxed more as well?
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redferry
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
i'm not bashing obese people but

They should be given a target amount of weight to lose each month and
if they don't lose it tax them more.

Money is the greatest to motivation anybody

no matter what they say.

They are lowering there quality of life for being obese anyway
Why? Given that mortality rate in most overweight people is lower than in thin people?

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/01/03...smid=fb-share&

Really it is meat eaters that should pay more tax - higher rate of pancreatic cancer among other things AND higher environmental impact.
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by M1011)
Same could be said for stupid people.

Maybe people should be forced to learn the difference between "there" and "their", along with simple sentence structures. If they fail, they should be taxed more.

Seems fair, after all they're lowering the quality of life for the people who read their ramblings?
whyy arer youu chainging ther convosationn thiss ise aboutt obesese peoepple :confused:

sorrry mrrr perfact
thats myy grammer iss nott perfectt
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by redferry)
Why? Given that mortality rate in most overweight people is lower than in thin people?

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/01/03...smid=fb-share&

Really it is meat eaters that should pay more tax - higher rate of pancreatic cancer among other things AND higher environmental impact.

how come you never see any of the world oldest people 25 stone +

because they die earlier that's why for being obese :cool:
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by C-Rooney)
What about people who suffer from medical conditions that result in weight gain, should they be taxed more as well?
yes, losing weight will improve their health overall
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SpiggyTopes
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They will tend to buy more food and so have a bigger VAT bill won't they?
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DaftPunk327
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(Original post by M1011)
Same could be said for stupid people.

Maybe people should be forced to learn the difference between "there" and "their", along with simple sentence structures. If they fail, they should be taxed more.

Seems fair, after all they're lowering the quality of life for the people who read their ramblings?
smack down
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redferry
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
how come you never see any of the world oldest people 25 stone +

because they die earlier that's why for being obese :cool:
So your unproven anecdotal evidence beats peer reviewed science? Hmmmmmm

100 years ago, when the worlds oldest people grew up, people didn't have enough food to get fat and people don't tend to suddenly drastically change their eating habits. If it is anecdotal evidence you want: You will note that Italians are one of the longest lived groups of people. All my older Italian family are really fat, doesn't do them any harm, I think they've all lived past 85 without fail.

Also sureley dying founder costs the government less given then they don't have to be tended to in old age?
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by redferry)
So your unproven anecdotal evidence beats peer reviewed science? Hmmmmmm

100 years ago, when the worlds oldest people grew up, people didn't have enough food to get fat and people don't tend to suddenly drastically change their eating habits. If it is anecdotal evidence you want: You will note that Italians are one of the longest lived groups of people. All my older Italian family are really fat, doesn't do them any harm, I think they've all lived past 85 without fail.

Also sureley dying founder costs the government less given then they don't have to be tended to in old age?
yes but they will need meds to keep them alive
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yo radical one
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
i'm not bashing obese people but

They should be given a target amount of weight to lose each month and
if they don't lose it tax them more.

Money is the greatest to motivation anybody

no matter what they say.

They are lowering there quality of life for being obese anyway
Equally skinny men who never lift weights or do any sport should have to pay more tax

People who don't eat healthy diets should pay more tax also

People who live in urban areas where there is more pollution should pay more tax

People who don't drink enough water should pay more tax

People who don't get enough sleep should pay more tax


All these things impact your health, so have a potentional so increase the burden on the NHS; I hope you see how stupid your suggestion is. Equally I could argue (using the same sort of logic) that people with private health insurance are less of a burden on the NHS and should thus pay less tax
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by yo radical one)
Equally skinny men who never lift weights or do any sport should have to pay more tax

People who don't eat healthy diets should pay more tax also

People who live in urban areas where there is more pollution should pay more tax

People who don't drink enough water should pay more tax

People who don't get enough sleep should pay more tax


All these things impact your health, so have a potentional so increase the burden on the NHS; I hope you see how stupid your suggestion is. Equally I could argue (using the same sort of logic) that people with private health insurance are less of a burden on the NHS and should thus pay less tax

People who don't eat healthy diets should pay more tax also

People who live in urban areas where there is more pollution should pay more tax

People who don't drink enough water should pay more tax

People who don't get enough sleep should pay more tax

all this will come in time

this country needs to save it people from themselves :cool:
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redferry
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
yes but they will need meds to keep them alive
You didn't address the point that you haven't provided any scientific evidence for your claims?

Nearly everyone needs drugs to keep them alive once they are older. Where is your evidence that overweight people need them earlier?
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tengentoppa
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What we should do is make them pay more for their seats on airplanes. You pay extra for more luggage, they should pay more for extra weight.

Also, it would incentivise people to lose weight. No-one wants to sit next to an obese person over-spilling into the seat next to them.
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yo radical one
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(Original post by LIT10106536)
People who don't eat healthy diets should pay more tax also

People who live in urban areas where there is more pollution should pay more tax

People who don't drink enough water should pay more tax

People who don't get enough sleep should pay more tax

all this will come in time

this country needs to save it people from themselves :cool:
It would cost so much money administrating this, investigating which people are leading healthy lifestyles etc. I'm not fat (slightly tempted to post pics one day to prove this) but people really do need to lay off fat people, because it seems so much to me, like stupid little boys want an excuse to bully people to somehow push themselves up the social scale, and fat-hate has become an acceptable way of doing so.
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LIT10106536
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(Original post by redferry)
You didn't address the point that you haven't provided any scientific evidence for your claims?

Nearly everyone needs drugs to keep them alive once they are older. Where is your evidence that overweight people need them earlier?

please read this

Obese may need larger drug doses


“Patients may have to be prescribed higher doses of antibiotics because of rising rates of obesity,” BBC News has reported.
The story is based on a narrative review in The Lancet. The authors say that drugs for treating infection should be prescribed according to body weight (as is the case when prescribing for children). They state that this may turn out to be advantageous to the person taking the drugs, the healthcare provider and the fight against disease in general.
Microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals are a genuine concern. If dosing that is tailored for individuals helps to prevent resistance, then it should be considered. However, changes to current prescribing would be costly and complex. More research is now needed, investigating if the benefits of tailored dosing are enough to warrant a change to current practice.

Where did the story come from?

Dr Matthew Falagas and Drosos Karageorgopoulos of the Alfa Institute of Biomedical Science, Athens, Greece, carried out this research. There was no funding provided for this narrative review. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journalThe Lancet.
This narrative review was accurately reflected in the news reports.

What kind of research was this?

This narrative review presents the authors’ views and experiences about how adult body weight may need to be taken into consideration when prescribing antimicrobials. It should not, therefore, be interpreted as a systematic review or original research. Whether or not tailored dosing for overweight and obese adults reduces the time it takes to clear infection will need further research and follow-up in a variety of adult populations.

What did the research involve?

The authors describe how advances in molecular biology and pharmacology have enabled the development of drug treatments that are tailored for individual patients. However, although the patient's body size needs to be taken into account for drug treatments to be of most benefit, they say that most dosing regimens, across medical specialties, do not currently take this into consideration.
The authors say that body size varies substantially around the world. The ‘modern epidemic’ of obesity, affecting more than 30% of people in the US and 20% of people in several European countries, needs to be taken into account.

The main discussion points

The authors say that, although pharmacokinetic studies (studies of how drugs are distributed, processed and disposed by the body) consider different ages and diseases, body size and other characteristics also need to be taken into account:

  • Physiological alterations to the body, such as increased adipose (fat) tissue, can affect distribution, metabolism and clearance of drugs from the body. In particular, different considerations need to be given to hydrophilic (‘water-loving’) and lipophilic (‘fat-loving’) drugs, as these have different distributions in obese and lean people. Body size may also have an effect on liver and kidney function, with obesity believed to increase clearance of drugs.
  • Available data support the notion that several antimicrobial drugs that are currently given in standard doses, should be given in higher doses to patients with large body size to help attain target effects on the body. These include β-lactams, vancomycin, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, linezolid, sulphonamides, fluconazole, aminoglycosides, daptomycin, colistin, and amphotericin B, co-trimoxazole, metronidazole and aciclovir.
  • However, the complex interaction between different drugs and body size means that a standard calculation would be difficult to establish. There are many factors that could be relevant, such as body mass index (BMI), total weight, adjusted weight (fraction of excess body weight added to ideal weight), lean body weight and body surface area. For different drugs, different factors may need to be considered to calculate the right dose. This is also the case for underweight people.
  • Based on the class of drug and its weight-dependent body distribution and clearance, some drugs may need to be given at greater or lesser amounts than the standard adult dose. Some drugs may need their starting dose adjusted, while others may need to have their maintenance dose changed. Others may benefit from being given at the standard dose but for a shorter or longer duration.
  • Such tailored doses may be beneficial for preventing antimicrobial resistance, and preventing suppression of normal ‘friendly’ bacterial flora in the body, in addition to giving maximum effectiveness and safety for the patient.


What did the researchers conclude?

The researchers suggest that all available published or unpublished pharmacokinetic data should be reassessed with the aim of identifying the most appropriate dosage adjustments for adults depending on their body weight. Further clinical trials would be needed to confirm that these readjusted doses are safe and effective for use.

Conclusion

This is a valuable discussion, which raises several important issues in the use of drugs to treat infection. The headlines should not be interpreted to mean that obese people are putting extra demand on antimicrobial supplies. The issue is that a dose tailored to body weight may be advantageous to the person, the healthcare provider and the fight against disease in general. The development of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals is a genuine concern. If individual patient-dosing would help to prevent this resistance, then these suggestions should be considered.
Another important issue is the minimisation of side effects. Clearance of infection is obviously an important outcome for the person taking the drugs, but just as important is avoiding any adverse effects or depleting levels of normal bacteria that live in the body, which can, in itself, lead to other infections. This risk can be reduced by not exposing patients to unnecessary drugs, and by ensuring that if antimicrobials are needed, they are not given for prolonged periods of time or in consecutive courses.
The researchers suggest that dosage adjustments according to body size and body composition should become “an integral part of the process of new antimicrobial drug development”, and this appears to be a worthy argument. However, as they have discussed, it may not be as easy as making one simple adjustment for body weight, and different methods may be needed for different drugs. In addition, changes to current prescribing would have considerable cost and practice implications that need to be considered.
A review of previous study data, as well as new clinical trials that dose according to body weight and that follow-up effects would be needed to see if the benefits are substantial enough to warrant a change to current practice for all prescribed drugs.
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