sickness on planes Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I don't get travel sick at any other time (although I can't read in cars without feeling nauseous) but I tend to get really ill on planes (like I've had to talk air hostesses out of having an ambulance waiting on the ground for me...) I start off just with a headache and nausea and mild dizziness but can end up with a severe headache, blurred vision, vomitting, and even occasionally fainting and vertigo, the longer the journey the worse it tends to get, it's not anxiety as I'm not really a nervous flier and I will be absolutely fine withing a few minutes of getting off the plane

does anyone else get plane sick as everyone I fly with just thinks I'm really weird and is there anything might help since I doubt it's normal travel sickness as I'm fine on long car/train journeys
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Anonymous #2
#2
Report 5 years ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don't get travel sick at any other time (although I can't read in cars without feeling nauseous) but I tend to get really ill on planes (like I've had to talk air hostesses out of having an ambulance waiting on the ground for me...) I start off just with a headache and nausea and mild dizziness but can end up with a severe headache, blurred vision, vomitting, and even occasionally fainting and vertigo, the longer the journey the worse it tends to get, it's not anxiety as I'm not really a nervous flier and I will be absolutely fine withing a few minutes of getting off the plane

does anyone else get plane sick as everyone I fly with just thinks I'm really weird and is there anything might help since I doubt it's normal travel sickness as I'm fine on long car/train journeys
Dude im exactly the same. You're not alone.

Ive never been travel sick apart from on planes. I never even used to get sick on flights when i was younger. Now that im old enough to actually think about flying, i get sick. It's all in the head i tell you, but sadly we cant do anything about it until we get completely used to it and stop thinking about it. I usually try so hard to not think about it that i spend my entire flight thinking about not getting sick...which is essentially the same as getting sick. Not sure if that happens to you too, but its a massive hassle haha. Don't worry, we'll get passed this horrible flight sickness stage at some point in our lives
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ihavemooedtoday
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#3
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Hmm I have never heard of anything like that. Maybe it's the pressure altitude?

Most airliners are pressurized to equivalent of 8000 ft atmospheric pressure, which gives you about 75% the amount of oxygen available compared to sea level.

They don't pressurize them to sea level because the plane would have to withstand much higher stress (which means they must be built stronger, heavier, and will burn a lot more fuel).

Most people don't really feel anything at 8000 ft, though some people with reduced lung function might... though in that case usually people become drunk-like in hypoxia. Headache and nausea are common symptoms of hypoxia, but usually it doesn't feel subjectively uncomfortable (which is dangerous for pilots). Do you get reduced/tunnel vision or impaired judgement (not being able to think clearly)? Those are very common symptom of hypoxia.

Though if you also can't read in cars, it's possible that it's just motion sickness, which is much more common. Have you tried ferries/ships?

If it's motion sickness, Gravol usually helps (or whatever the commercial name is in the UK).
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Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
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(Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
Hmm I have never heard of anything like that. Maybe it's the pressure altitude?

Most airliners are pressurized to equivalent of 8000 ft atmospheric pressure, which gives you about 75% the amount of oxygen available compared to sea level.

They don't pressurize them to sea level because the plane would have to withstand much higher stress (which means they must be built stronger, heavier, and will burn a lot more fuel).

Most people don't really feel anything at 8000 ft, though some people with reduced lung function might... though in that case usually people become drunk-like in hypoxia. Headache and nausea are common symptoms of hypoxia, but usually it doesn't feel subjectively uncomfortable (which is dangerous for pilots). Do you get reduced/tunnel vision or impaired judgement (not being able to think clearly)? Those are very common symptom of hypoxia.

Though if you also can't read in cars, it's possible that it's just motion sickness, which is much more common. Have you tried ferries/ships?

If it's motion sickness, Gravol usually helps (or whatever the commercial name is in the UK).
I've actually been to to the top of Kilimanjaro which is just short of 6000m, 8000ft is about 2.5km I think? I was okay when I was trekking at that altitude (except for mild breathing problems) although I do tend to feel impaired judgement while flying so maybe it is that?

I'm okay on boats of all types, I'll try and look into gravol thanks
(Original post by Anonymous)
Dude im exactly the same. You're not alone.

Ive never been travel sick apart from on planes. I never even used to get sick on flights when i was younger. Now that im old enough to actually think about flying, i get sick. It's all in the head i tell you, but sadly we cant do anything about it until we get completely used to it and stop thinking about it. I usually try so hard to not think about it that i spend my entire flight thinking about not getting sick...which is essentially the same as getting sick. Not sure if that happens to you too, but its a massive hassle haha. Don't worry, we'll get passed this horrible flight sickness stage at some point in our lives
yeah started for me when I was 12, it is a massive hassle - especially when you end up in a middle seat or something haha, no one ever seems to want to hear that you might need to get up a lot during the flight when it might mean you get the aisle seat... glad I'm not the only one in the world
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honeywhite
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#5
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don't get travel sick at any other time (although I can't read in cars without feeling nauseous) but I tend to get really ill on planes (like I've had to talk air hostesses out of having an ambulance waiting on the ground for me...) I start off just with a headache and nausea and mild dizziness but can end up with a severe headache, blurred vision, vomitting, and even occasionally fainting and vertigo, the longer the journey the worse it tends to get, it's not anxiety as I'm not really a nervous flier and I will be absolutely fine withing a few minutes of getting off the plane

does anyone else get plane sick as everyone I fly with just thinks I'm really weird and is there anything might help since I doubt it's normal travel sickness as I'm fine on long car/train journeys
Perhaps something in the air? I suggest you try cyclizine or Zofran anyway, because perhaps it's just travel sickness, but if that doesn't help, talk to a G.P.
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threeportdrift
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#6
Report 5 years ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
does anyone else get plane sick as everyone I fly with just thinks I'm really weird and is there anything might help since I doubt it's normal travel sickness as I'm fine on long car/train journeys

It is normal travel sickness, but the frequency of the vibrations you are sensitive to are just those found on aircraft, not cars, trains etc. Quite often people are only sensitive to some types of aircraft. It's common during military flying training where people are not airsick on propeller driven aircraft but are on jets or vice versa.

Just dose yourself up on anti-travel sickness tablets and go through all the recommended anti-sickness procedures (no fatty food, no alcohol etc)
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ihavemooedtoday
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I've actually been to to the top of Kilimanjaro which is just short of 6000m, 8000ft is about 2.5km I think? I was okay when I was trekking at that altitude (except for mild breathing problems) although I do tend to feel impaired judgement while flying so maybe it is that?
Ah OK. In that case, it's definitely not hypoxia, otherwise it would be much worse at 6000m.

Sounds just like motion sickness then!
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