What language should I study?

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Zoe_Marie
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#1
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#1
Hi
I've always been interested in languages, and although I'm studying engineering at university I still want to carry on with my languages.

Currently I'm fluent in English and French, I have an A* in German GCSE and am self-teaching basic Spanish. Eventually the plan is to improve my German and Spanish so I can comfortably hold a conversation or read a newspaper in either.

My question is: are there any languages that are really helpful or really widely desired, especially for engineering? Which languages are fun to learn?
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RHyoudon'kno
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#2
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#2
Mandarin sounds fun.
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Zoe_Marie
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#3
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(Original post by RHyoudon'kno)
Mandarin sounds fun.
I think learning a different alphabet might be pretty difficult though
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A5ko
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Zoe_Marie)
I think learning a different alphabet might be pretty difficult though
Look at it this way. If you can learn a new alphabet, all the other languages should be pretty easy.
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EULawguy
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#5
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Hello! I think that if you plan on taking a career in engineering, your best bet would be German. There is a big job market in (Central) Europe for engineers: Germany, Switzerland, etc. atm.

French is useful imo if you want to stay close to Brussels and EU institutions.

Don't overestimate Spanish. I mean, it's a good language to know for international business but if you're planning on staying in Europe I don't really think it's that useful for your career.

Mandarin only for IB as well, if you're interested in the Chinese market. I don't think it's that useful (Russian looks more appealing in that sense for me).
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Катя
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#6
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(Original post by Zoe_Marie)
I think learning a different alphabet might be pretty difficult though
Mandarin is super easy. No grammar involved.
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Zoe_Marie
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(Original post by EULawguy)
Hello! I think that if you plan on taking a career in engineering, your best bet would be German. There is a big job market in (Central) Europe for engineers: Germany, Switzerland, etc. atm.

French is useful imo if you want to stay close to Brussels and EU institutions.

Don't overestimate Spanish. I mean, it's a good language to know for international business but if you're planning on staying in Europe I don't really think it's that useful for your career.

Mandarin only for IB as well, if you're interested in the Chinese market. I don't think it's that useful (Russian looks more appealing in that sense for me).
I might actually try Dutch because ESA is in the Netherlands and both my parents used to work there so I'd quite like to follow in their footsteps, as it were. Any ideas on how good this would be from a European perspective?
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EULawguy
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(Original post by Zoe_Marie)
I might actually try Dutch because ESA is in the Netherlands and both my parents used to work there so I'd quite like to follow in their footsteps, as it were. Any ideas on how good this would be from a European perspective?
I don't really think you'll need to know Dutch to join ESA, but anyways you will need Dutch if you plan to join its labor market. Not for academic studies / international agencies or positions related with such kind of vacancies, etc.

Most of Netherland's universities offer Master courses in English so you don't actually need Dutch for that.

Anyways, in my opinion, the most important languages to know if you want to keep your job prospects in Europe quite broad are German, English and French. Any other language, imo, is quite local.

I commend you for your interest in learning new languages, btw. You might want to try the Assimil method books, they are very good for self-teaching alongside with a grammar builder. That's how I learned a bit of Russian and plan on self-teaching myself French for this summer.

If you need some tips or a penpal for Spanish (if you're still interested), send me a PM.
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RHyoudon'kno
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Zoe_Marie)
I think learning a different alphabet might be pretty difficult though
It's a challenge. But it'll be fun.
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Zoe_Marie
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#10
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#10
(Original post by EULawguy)
I don't really think you'll need to know Dutch to join ESA, but anyways you will need Dutch if you plan to join its labor market. Not for academic studies / international agencies or positions related with such kind of vacancies, etc.

Most of Netherland's universities offer Master courses in English so you don't actually need Dutch for that.

Anyways, in my opinion, the most important languages to know if you want to keep your job prospects in Europe quite broad are German, English and French. Any other language, imo, is quite local.

I commend you for your interest in learning new languages, btw. You might want to try the Assimil method books, they are very good for self-teaching alongside with a grammar builder. That's how I learned a bit of Russian and plan on self-teaching myself French for this summer.

If you need some tips or a penpal for Spanish (if you're still interested), send me a PM.
That's very kind of you, but so far the most complex sentence I can do is something like ''Mi perro corre sobre mis zapatos.''
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skunkboy
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#11
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#11
Computer languages. Python should be the first to learn.

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