Want more information about this university?

Pros/cons of the University of Chester

Watch
MayaFly7
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hi there!

Newbie here! I have put Chester as my insurance choice and Keele as my firm choice but now I'm starting to wish I chose Chester as my form even though it has lower entry requirements!

I would love to know your opinions on the University of Chester's...

English Literature course
Accommodation (pref full board ensuite)
Night life
Student union
Making friends

Thanks
0
reply
University of Chester
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Hi, it might be possible to change your decision to Firm if you wanted? Our Admissions team can explain more. Call them on 01244 511000
0
reply
Lil2wkd
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
Of course
(Original post by MayaFly7)
Hi there!

Newbie here! I have put Chester as my insurance choice and Keele as my firm choice but now I'm starting to wish I chose Chester as my form even though it has lower entry requirements!

I would love to know your opinions on the University of Chester's...

English Literature course
Accommodation (pref full board ensuite)
Night life
Student union
Making friends

Thanks
I can definitely answer some of this! A brief background, some of it relevant: I graduated in Counselling Skills with English Lit (English was my minor) last year, and I was a mature student with confidence issues.

If you've heard good stuff about our English courses, its all pretty much true. Not all the lectures etc take place in the Vicarage as there simply isn't the space, but the more weighted your course is to English, the more likely you'll have something there. The lecturers are lovely people, very welcoming and friendly, and really good at getting back to you when you need help. They're eccentric too, which at least for me was a big bonus!
The course has changed a little bit since I started-I believe there's an extra module in the first year now, but it broke down for a bit like this:
Year One-The Basics. Some of this you may know from A-Level. I did not, having studied English Language, not Literature. You look at a selection of texts from Elizabethan times onwards-you dabble in a bit of everything really.
Year Two-The Romantics, Victorianism, Modules and Beyond. Everyone has to do either the Romantics or Victorianism module, and then make up the rest of the points in other Modules. This might be spread over two subjects-I did just Victorianism in English, then did a core Module and a smaller module in Counselling. Options in English include the Gothic, Sci Fi, and a module on Sanity if I recall-which usually fills up quickly. You also have to do a module in the third term, which is either Work Based Learning, a Writing Project, or a Study aboard programme. WBL might not be an option for you with English, I'm not sure.
Year Three- Modernism. Like the second year, you have to take a core module and en other modules to make up the points. I forget the choices, but one of them was Modernism, and again, the selection for the other modules is varied-Utopia, Brave New World.. And the dissertation/Writing Project I think is optional. However don't quote me on that-I was always going to major in counselling, so my information on the extra modules is definitely not confirmed as accurate-plus it was two years ago that I made the module choices.
Accommodation-I'd check other threads n here about that, I didn't get the option but basically you list your five options on the kind of accommodation you want, and the uni does it's best to fill it on a first come first served basis. I went private with my accommodation, so go again, not an expert. However I'll personally recommend going self catered, as that's what you'll be doing in second and third years anyway.
We've got a cracking Student Union, the staff are all students, and the drinks are cheaper than you'll find in town-an average pint in Chester City is three quid, in the Union, it's two fifteen. There's so ething going on a a nights a week, Sundays alternates between Poker and a Pub Quiz, there's live music, and comedy nights. It IS small, and on a Friday night is is PACKED. Friday in the city is when the none-students tend to come out to play, so the prices go up. The SU on the other hand does it's own club night, themes, special offers. Not my taste, but it's a great atmosphere regardless. There's normally something going on somewhere in terms of night life-one of the potential cons being that whilst there quite a lot of bards, there's only really two clubs as such, Rosie's and Cruise.
Monday-Student Beans at Cruise. Invariably some kind of theme night, it's Cruise's student night
Tuesday-Gay Night/Rock Night at Rosie's. Amusingly not on the same floor, and the quality of Rock Night is DJ dependent IMO, but both floors are really welcoming.
Wednesday-it's a half day of study, because there's sports events in the afternoon, then people go, shower, eat, then head to GetOnIt at Rosie's. Specifically students only, again, there's usually a theme night.
Thursday-Three in a Bed! Not as kinky as it sounds, you buy a drink in one bar, a drink in another bar, then use the vouchers you get to get into Rosie's for free. There's also Propaganda at Cruise, an Indie music night that's really good.
Friday-SU Friday, or if Rock Music is your thing, Grind at the Phoenix is a most awesome night.
I have no idea what happens Saturday, but Sunday there's quizzes on in multiple places around the city.
On top of all that, there's loads of bars and pubs around, and Liverpool and Manchester are less than an hour away on the train. However, the cons... There no cinema or bowling alley in the City. The nearest are at Cheshire Oaks, which there are regular buses to, or you could find someone who drives.
We've also got a load of societies-we cover all major sports, quite a few niche ones, including fencing, archery, and Quidditch. Alongside those we've a load of societies, including covering the main political parties, debate, roleplaying, computer games, Counselling, anime, all sorts. Making friends-definitely not a problem. Due to my circumstances-I kind of avoided making friends at first due to not wanting to say goodbyes when I left the UK (I'm an ex-pat). Suffice to say, I have made some of the best friends I could ever have and know the most amazing people as a result of my time at. Chester. Combined with the fact that you're doing English, you'll be fine. From my own experience, a lot of people who do English tend to do it with another English related subject-English language, Drama, Creative writing etc, so you'll be seeing a lot of the same people and you'll naturally become friends as a result. Seriously, Vhester is an awesome uni and I don't think you'd regret making your choice to come to us.
1
reply
MayaFly7
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#4
Thank you for taking the time to write such an informative response! I really did get a good feeling at Chester when I went to an applicant day and the Creative Writing lecturer leading the English Lit lecture in the Vicarage was very eccentric! Thanks again

(Original post by Lil2wkd)
Of course


I can definitely answer some of this! A brief background, some of it relevant: I graduated in Counselling Skills with English Lit (English was my minor) last year, and I was a mature student with confidence issues.

If you've heard good stuff about our English courses, its all pretty much true. Not all the lectures etc take place in the Vicarage as there simply isn't the space, but the more weighted your course is to English, the more likely you'll have something there. The lecturers are lovely people, very welcoming and friendly, and really good at getting back to you when you need help. They're eccentric too, which at least for me was a big bonus!
The course has changed a little bit since I started-I believe there's an extra module in the first year now, but it broke down for a bit like this:
Year One-The Basics. Some of this you may know from A-Level. I did not, having studied English Language, not Literature. You look at a selection of texts from Elizabethan times onwards-you dabble in a bit of everything really.
Year Two-The Romantics, Victorianism, Modules and Beyond. Everyone has to do either the Romantics or Victorianism module, and then make up the rest of the points in other Modules. This might be spread over two subjects-I did just Victorianism in English, then did a core Module and a smaller module in Counselling. Options in English include the Gothic, Sci Fi, and a module on Sanity if I recall-which usually fills up quickly. You also have to do a module in the third term, which is either Work Based Learning, a Writing Project, or a Study aboard programme. WBL might not be an option for you with English, I'm not sure.
Year Three- Modernism. Like the second year, you have to take a core module and en other modules to make up the points. I forget the choices, but one of them was Modernism, and again, the selection for the other modules is varied-Utopia, Brave New World.. And the dissertation/Writing Project I think is optional. However don't quote me on that-I was always going to major in counselling, so my information on the extra modules is definitely not confirmed as accurate-plus it was two years ago that I made the module choices.
Accommodation-I'd check other threads n here about that, I didn't get the option but basically you list your five options on the kind of accommodation you want, and the uni does it's best to fill it on a first come first served basis. I went private with my accommodation, so go again, not an expert. However I'll personally recommend going self catered, as that's what you'll be doing in second and third years anyway.
We've got a cracking Student Union, the staff are all students, and the drinks are cheaper than you'll find in town-an average pint in Chester City is three quid, in the Union, it's two fifteen. There's so ething going on a a nights a week, Sundays alternates between Poker and a Pub Quiz, there's live music, and comedy nights. It IS small, and on a Friday night is is PACKED. Friday in the city is when the none-students tend to come out to play, so the prices go up. The SU on the other hand does it's own club night, themes, special offers. Not my taste, but it's a great atmosphere regardless. There's normally something going on somewhere in terms of night life-one of the potential cons being that whilst there quite a lot of bards, there's only really two clubs as such, Rosie's and Cruise.
Monday-Student Beans at Cruise. Invariably some kind of theme night, it's Cruise's student night
Tuesday-Gay Night/Rock Night at Rosie's. Amusingly not on the same floor, and the quality of Rock Night is DJ dependent IMO, but both floors are really welcoming.
Wednesday-it's a half day of study, because there's sports events in the afternoon, then people go, shower, eat, then head to GetOnIt at Rosie's. Specifically students only, again, there's usually a theme night.
Thursday-Three in a Bed! Not as kinky as it sounds, you buy a drink in one bar, a drink in another bar, then use the vouchers you get to get into Rosie's for free. There's also Propaganda at Cruise, an Indie music night that's really good.
Friday-SU Friday, or if Rock Music is your thing, Grind at the Phoenix is a most awesome night.
I have no idea what happens Saturday, but Sunday there's quizzes on in multiple places around the city.
On top of all that, there's loads of bars and pubs around, and Liverpool and Manchester are less than an hour away on the train. However, the cons... There no cinema or bowling alley in the City. The nearest are at Cheshire Oaks, which there are regular buses to, or you could find someone who drives.
We've also got a load of societies-we cover all major sports, quite a few niche ones, including fencing, archery, and Quidditch. Alongside those we've a load of societies, including covering the main political parties, debate, roleplaying, computer games, Counselling, anime, all sorts. Making friends-definitely not a problem. Due to my circumstances-I kind of avoided making friends at first due to not wanting to say goodbyes when I left the UK (I'm an ex-pat). Suffice to say, I have made some of the best friends I could ever have and know the most amazing people as a result of my time at. Chester. Combined with the fact that you're doing English, you'll be fine. From my own experience, a lot of people who do English tend to do it with another English related subject-English language, Drama, Creative writing etc, so you'll be seeing a lot of the same people and you'll naturally become friends as a result. Seriously, Vhester is an awesome uni and I don't think you'd regret making your choice to come to us.
0
reply
KindofGood
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by Lil2wkd)
Of course


I can definitely answer some of this! A brief background, some of it relevant: I graduated in Counselling Skills with English Lit (English was my minor) last year, and I was a mature student with confidence issues.

If you've heard good stuff about our English courses, its all pretty much true. Not all the lectures etc take place in the Vicarage as there simply isn't the space, but the more weighted your course is to English, the more likely you'll have something there. The lecturers are lovely people, very welcoming and friendly, and really good at getting back to you when you need help. They're eccentric too, which at least for me was a big bonus!
The course has changed a little bit since I started-I believe there's an extra module in the first year now, but it broke down for a bit like this:
Year One-The Basics. Some of this you may know from A-Level. I did not, having studied English Language, not Literature. You look at a selection of texts from Elizabethan times onwards-you dabble in a bit of everything really.
Year Two-The Romantics, Victorianism, Modules and Beyond. Everyone has to do either the Romantics or Victorianism module, and then make up the rest of the points in other Modules. This might be spread over two subjects-I did just Victorianism in English, then did a core Module and a smaller module in Counselling. Options in English include the Gothic, Sci Fi, and a module on Sanity if I recall-which usually fills up quickly. You also have to do a module in the third term, which is either Work Based Learning, a Writing Project, or a Study aboard programme. WBL might not be an option for you with English, I'm not sure.
Year Three- Modernism. Like the second year, you have to take a core module and en other modules to make up the points. I forget the choices, but one of them was Modernism, and again, the selection for the other modules is varied-Utopia, Brave New World.. And the dissertation/Writing Project I think is optional. However don't quote me on that-I was always going to major in counselling, so my information on the extra modules is definitely not confirmed as accurate-plus it was two years ago that I made the module choices.
Accommodation-I'd check other threads n here about that, I didn't get the option but basically you list your five options on the kind of accommodation you want, and the uni does it's best to fill it on a first come first served basis. I went private with my accommodation, so go again, not an expert. However I'll personally recommend going self catered, as that's what you'll be doing in second and third years anyway.
We've got a cracking Student Union, the staff are all students, and the drinks are cheaper than you'll find in town-an average pint in Chester City is three quid, in the Union, it's two fifteen. There's so ething going on a a nights a week, Sundays alternates between Poker and a Pub Quiz, there's live music, and comedy nights. It IS small, and on a Friday night is is PACKED. Friday in the city is when the none-students tend to come out to play, so the prices go up. The SU on the other hand does it's own club night, themes, special offers. Not my taste, but it's a great atmosphere regardless. There's normally something going on somewhere in terms of night life-one of the potential cons being that whilst there quite a lot of bards, there's only really two clubs as such, Rosie's and Cruise.
Monday-Student Beans at Cruise. Invariably some kind of theme night, it's Cruise's student night
Tuesday-Gay Night/Rock Night at Rosie's. Amusingly not on the same floor, and the quality of Rock Night is DJ dependent IMO, but both floors are really welcoming.
Wednesday-it's a half day of study, because there's sports events in the afternoon, then people go, shower, eat, then head to GetOnIt at Rosie's. Specifically students only, again, there's usually a theme night.
Thursday-Three in a Bed! Not as kinky as it sounds, you buy a drink in one bar, a drink in another bar, then use the vouchers you get to get into Rosie's for free. There's also Propaganda at Cruise, an Indie music night that's really good.
Friday-SU Friday, or if Rock Music is your thing, Grind at the Phoenix is a most awesome night.
I have no idea what happens Saturday, but Sunday there's quizzes on in multiple places around the city.
On top of all that, there's loads of bars and pubs around, and Liverpool and Manchester are less than an hour away on the train. However, the cons... There no cinema or bowling alley in the City. The nearest are at Cheshire Oaks, which there are regular buses to, or you could find someone who drives.
We've also got a load of societies-we cover all major sports, quite a few niche ones, including fencing, archery, and Quidditch. Alongside those we've a load of societies, including covering the main political parties, debate, roleplaying, computer games, Counselling, anime, all sorts. Making friends-definitely not a problem. Due to my circumstances-I kind of avoided making friends at first due to not wanting to say goodbyes when I left the UK (I'm an ex-pat). Suffice to say, I have made some of the best friends I could ever have and know the most amazing people as a result of my time at. Chester. Combined with the fact that you're doing English, you'll be fine. From my own experience, a lot of people who do English tend to do it with another English related subject-English language, Drama, Creative writing etc, so you'll be seeing a lot of the same people and you'll naturally become friends as a result. Seriously, Vhester is an awesome uni and I don't think you'd regret making your choice to come to us.
The general election is next year where the next Prime Minister will be elected, should be a good time for politics.
0
reply
Lil2wkd
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by MayaFly7)
Thank you for taking the time to write such an informative response! I really did get a good feeling at Chester when I went to an applicant day and the Creative Writing lecturer leading the English Lit lecture in the Vicarage was very eccentric! Thanks again
Guy with grey hair in a ponytail called Derek? If so, the guy is a LEGEND. Sadly I never got taught by him, but he's a fantastic bloke.


(Original post by KindofGood)
The general election is next year where the next Prime Minister will be elected, should be a good time for politics.
I lived with three Politics students in my final year, and I have to admit, the Politics students here if nothing else are very passionate.



If there's anything else, just ask!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (120)
28.1%
No - I have already returned home (57)
13.35%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (84)
19.67%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (40)
9.37%
No - I live at home during term anyway (126)
29.51%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed