The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

Success rates at LSE graduate level?

I'm curious to know what the success rate is among students that undertake a LSE graduate program - accounting/finance/economics specifically.

Can you reasonably argue that once you get an offer and you work hard and don't somehow mess everything up, you have a pretty big chance of getting your MSc?

Universities like the LSE have certain requirements for their programs. That already acts as a "filter". Furthermore, the LSE has the lowest offer to application ratio in the UK so that acts as another filter. You'd imagine that after all these steps, students that hold an offer generally get their MSc, unless like I mentioned beforehand, you don't work hard enough.

This contracts with programs like the MSc in Finance at HEC Lausanne. Although not very well known, this is one of the best programs in Europe and everyone can pretty much get in (e.g. having a swiss bachelor degree means you can enter automatically). At this program, after a single semester, a third of students drop out, after a year, it's down by half.
Reply 1
You have to literally do nothing throughout the entire year to fail at LSE. However, getting anything below merit would render the whole thing pretty useless.
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Reply 2
Original post by CEKTOP
You have to literally do nothing throughout the entire year to fail at LSE. However, getting anything below merit would render the whole thing pretty useless.


So are you saying that the courses at LSE are relatively easy? I don't quite get your point.

With regards to your second comment, does that mean that getting a LSE master degree without a merit mention will severely disadvantage someone when looking for a position/internship?
Reply 3
Original post by swissstud
So are you saying that the courses at LSE are relatively easy? I don't quite get your point.

With regards to your second comment, does that mean that getting a LSE master degree without a merit mention will severely disadvantage someone when looking for a position/internship?


If you get a pass you can pretty much throw your degree out the window - it won't interest anyone.

Unless you are mentally challenged or completely unable to concentrate on anything getting a merit will not be an issue.
Reply 4
By the way, how does the grading system work at the LSE?

I've never studied in the UK and I tried to find the info on the website of the LSE but couldn't find much.

So what grade - or percentage - do you need in order to get a "merit"?
Original post by swissstud
By the way, how does the grading system work at the LSE?

I've never studied in the UK and I tried to find the info on the website of the LSE but couldn't find much.

So what grade - or percentage - do you need in order to get a "merit"?


Merits at 60+
Distinctions at 70+
Pass at 50+
Complete nonsense. Unless you are going for a specific career in the field of your masters ie academic or Phd etc then most employers in Finance etc will only care about your undergrad grade and fact you have the Masters. When they write your bio sometimes they will say something like.. Joshua has a 1st class BSc in Mathematics and Economics from LSE and a MSc in Finance and Private Equity. They never mention your masters grade. Nobody cares in corporate world.

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