Is there any point in Philosophy?

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Scholar2
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I mean some of the skills it gives you can be great when studying it but other than that is it useful? You could say it gives us answers to deep questions, but have the big ones being answered like where are we from, isn't it more practical to deal with problems we can deal with? You could say it teaches us to make right decisions but do you ever see anyone consult a philosophy book.
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by Scholar2)
I mean some of the skills it gives you can be great when studying it but other than that is it useful? You could say it gives us answers to deep questions, but have the big ones being answered like where are we from, isn't it more practical to deal with problems we can deal with? You could say it teaches us to make right decisions but do you ever see anyone consult a philosophy book.
Judges engage in philosophy on a regular basis. Philosophy is useful in any field which values wisdom and power of reasoning.
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Remedium
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http://www.importanceofphilosophy.com/

Philosophy is perhaps more practical and applicable in society in terms of ethics and political philosophy.

http://www.importanceofphilosophy.co...nchesMain.html
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Groundearth
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It's very useful in areas such as medical ethics boards, the legal system, politics, etc. We make moral and ethical (or not) decisions from philosophy; we need something to steer us in the right (or wrong) direction to come to a decision about something.
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miser
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Yes, it is applicable in all sorts of areas, from law and polical theory to the interpretation of natural language by AI.
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Scholar2
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(Original post by TurboCretin)
Judges engage in philosophy on a regular basis. Philosophy is useful in any field which values wisdom and power of reasoning.
(Original post by Remedium)
http://www.importanceofphilosophy.com/

Philosophy is perhaps more practical and applicable in society in terms of ethics and political philosophy.

http://www.importanceofphilosophy.co...nchesMain.html
Yes but if you took away the subject Philosophy they would still have to think like that, thats what being a judge is.
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Scholar2
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(Original post by Groundearth)
It's very useful in areas such as medical ethics boards, the legal system, politics, etc. We make moral and ethical (or not) decisions from philosophy; we need something to steer us in the right (or wrong) direction to come to a decision about something.
Yes but again if you took away the subject philosophy people would still have to come up with logical arguments as if they cared enough to convince people it would happen. Sometimes ethics aren't always practical, you may be faced with a situation where you have to do something that isn't ethically right but is beneficial.
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Groundearth
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(Original post by Scholar2)
Yes but again if you took away the subject philosophy people would still have to come up with logical arguments as if they cared enough to convince people it would happen. Sometimes ethics aren't always practical, you may be faced with a situation where you have to do something that isn't ethically right but is beneficial.
If you do something unethical in the workplace, the vast majority of the time you will be fired. Especially in healthcare and law, it's better to make the ethical decision than to do something unethical even though you think you're doing the right thing and/or something beneficial. Nurses and doctors get struck off for this a lot, and academic philosophy and ethics sets these standards and dictates what is and isn't appropriate to do.
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Nogoodsorgods
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Philosophy debates ethics whilst a homeless man starves next to the department.
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Scholar2
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(Original post by Groundearth)
If you do something unethical in the workplace, the vast majority of the time you will be fired. Especially in healthcare and law, it's better to make the ethical decision than to do something unethical even though you think you're doing the right thing and/or something beneficial. Nurses and doctors get struck off for this a lot, and academic philosophy and ethics sets these standards and dictates what is and isn't appropriate to do.
Thats a good point actually as people don't always know whats best. Well I suppose that makes it useful although would you agree its not always accessible?
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Scholar2
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(Original post by Nogoodsorgods)
Philosophy debates ethics whilst a homeless man starves next to the department.
I like that quote, its kind of my point.
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Another
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(Original post by Scholar2)
Yes but again if you took away the subject philosophy people would still have to come up with logical arguments as if they cared enough to convince people it would happen. Sometimes ethics aren't always practical, you may be faced with a situation where you have to do something that isn't ethically right but is beneficial.
That's a bit like saying "Even if you took away the subject of Physics, people would still have to devise laws and equations to deal with building complexes and predicting mechanical movements in the future"

Although I'm inclined to agree - the practice of philosophy is beneficial in the context of everyday life, however the subject taught in schools is a bit of a waste of time.
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Scholar2
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(Original post by Another)
That's a bit like saying "Even if you took away the subject of Physics, people would still have to devise laws and equations to deal with building complexes and predicting mechanical movements in the future"

Although I'm inclined to agree - the practice of philosophy is beneficial in the context of everyday life, however the subject taught in schools is a bit of a waste of time.
I suppose its not the best argument haha, maybe I should have took philosophy. I just think you could take away philosophy and let it blend in with the other subjects.
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by Scholar2)
Yes but if you took away the subject Philosophy they would still have to think like that, thats what being a judge is.
Philosophy isn't just a course you study at school. If you engage in reasoned debate about ethics or the interpretation of a text, you are attempting philosophy whether you've been formally schooled in it or not.
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Groundearth
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(Original post by Scholar2)
Thats a good point actually as people don't always know whats best. Well I suppose that makes it useful although would you agree its not always accessible?
I would agree that it's not always accessible, and that it should be more widely available. In healthcare it is taught though, so there isn't really an excuse for unethical decisions. An example would be that you're a doctor and you think a certain drug will help a patient and they don't want to take it, but you sneak it into their other drugs anyway. Even though their condition might improve and you were right, it was not your right to give it to them without their knowledge because they didn't want it, and you would be struck off for this.
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Scholar2
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(Original post by Groundearth)
I would agree that it's not always accessible, and that it should be more widely available. In healthcare it is taught though, so there isn't really an excuse for unethical decisions. An example would be that you're a doctor and you think a certain drug will help a patient and they don't want to take it, but you sneak it into their other drugs anyway. Even though their condition might improve and you were right, it was not your right to give it to them without their knowledge because they didn't want it, and you would be struck off for this.
But thats where philosophy isn't practical as the most beneficial thing is for the man to be given it.
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Groundearth
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(Original post by Scholar2)
But thats where philosophy isn't practical as the most beneficial thing is for the man to be given it.
Depending on the situation, that might not be the case. The man might be dying and wants to die; he should have the choice whether to refuse medication or not, which he does. He might know he will react really badly to the drug; even though it might help him, in the process it could make him throw up, bleed, feel sick, pass out, etc and it's still his right to not take it if he doesn't want to. He might have an allergy to the drug and die, he might want to take the drug later in the day or in a week's time or not ever at all; legally he has the right to accept or refuse any medication for whatever reason he wants, and going against that is unethical. It's his body and he can refuse whatever treatment he likes, and accept any offered, as long as he has the mental capacity to do so. Doctors can't do whatever they want to patients.
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TallerThanSmall
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(Original post by Nogoodsorgods)
Philosophy debates ethics whilst a homeless man starves next to the department.
Yeah, but only if the people in the philosophy department are really crap. Reasoning about doing good and actually doing good are not by any means mutually exclusive - as long as you don't fall into the pitfall of intellectualising away your empathy, in fact, I think they feed into each other rather nicely.
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Marco1
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That's a very philosophical question!
Philosophy is integral to human nature. It's the art of thinking and pondering on all manner of things in order to reach better understanding.
It helps us to explore the truth of things through a disciplined and objective intellectual exploration of the topic under consideration. Philosophy is the King and progenitor of all academic subjects. All other disciplines were born from its womb. Its majesty shines resplendent and pure and knows no bounds!

A philosopher cannot be subjugated or manipulated because he/she has the power to think independently. Ignorance is bliss whereas philosophy can lead one into a wilderness of unexpected anguish, disillusionment and delight, but the search for truth and wisdom is worth all.
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B-FJL3
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One of the purposes, if not the main purpose, of a university is to encourage and nurture academic thought, debate and research in all its forms. Philosophy, as the previous post has explained, is an integral part of this. Whether or not it is practical is irrelevant. Education is worth pursuing for its own sake and I am perfectly happy for taxes to be spent on philosophy departments where learned men are able to consider life, humanity, and their meaning and nature, so that they can share their theories and conclusions with the rest of us, and perhaps challenge our preconceptions or allow us to think about common things in uncommon ways.
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