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    I'm an international student considering to do my master in the UK, so I don't really have any clue about the universities except Oxbridge ;-)

    I'm interested in doing a master in IR or Intelligence&Security or similar and I know King's college and their war department has a good reputation (and I really want to apply there), but do you know anything about Brunel's MA Intelligence&Security? And what about Nottingham's MA International Security&Terrorism?

    Thanks a lot for your answers.

    Cheers
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    University of Wales, Aberystwyth 's master's programmes are academically as good as the ones of king's.
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    Ir -> Lse
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    oh, thanks for your answers. I haven't looked at Aberytwyth's masters yet. tahnks for the hint!
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    IN ORDER,

    lSE, NOTTINGHAM/KINGS, BRUNEL THEN ABERYSTWYTH.
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    lse
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    (Original post by BigDog04)
    IN ORDER,

    lSE, NOTTINGHAM/KINGS, BRUNEL THEN ABERYSTWYTH.
    Are you sure Nottingham and LSE offer master in intelligence and security studies? They do offer master in IR but intelligence studies is a very new, small and special subfield. King's is probably the best for security and intelligence studies then definitely Aberystwyth. Only a small number of unis offer this kind of master programme.

    Thanks.
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    Principessa,

    If you are serious considering an MA in Intelligence and Security Studies, and you choose LSE over Brunel, you will regret it. LSE may be in a nicer area with a bigger name, but the degree at Brunel is unquestionably the best of the bunch. It provides, in an academic setting, the best opportunity to practically use the information you are taught. The degree at King's is much more historically based, while Brunel's is based on providing the knowledge necessary to succeed in today's intelligence community.

    How do I know this? I myself am an international student at Brunel, obtaining my MA in Intelligence and Security Studies. I has the choice between King's, LSE (for IR), and Brunel, and I chose Brunel. If your goal is to be a PhD candidate a year after you get you MA, go to King's, LSE, etc. If you want to work in the intelligence community, go to Brunel.
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    Principessa,

    The MA course at Brunel, Intelligence and Security Studies, offers the best blend of teaching. Although the course at King's is good, it's heavily reliant on teaching from a theoretical and historical perspective.

    There are these elements on the course at Brunel of course, but there is a mix with practical applications as well. I looked at the other courses you mentioned and I decided that Brunel's was by far the best option, given what they cover and the manner in which they do it. I'm sure if you compare the various course outlines you'll see which one is the most interesting!

    It was a while ago that you posted - but if you (or anyone else for that matter) want info on the Intelligence and Security Studies MA at Brunel, send me a message.
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    A lot of the courses mentioned differ substantially to how much weight is given to Intelligence, Security or History modules. Unless what you're primarily banking on is "the name" for general employment; take a close look at the course structure of each MA. If you're set on going to a particular industry or sector, you need to consider if the modules each MA offers will be useful to you.

    Brunel is very intelligence-heavy and has specialized itself very narrowly which could be an asset if you're aim is to gain as much knowledge as you can on intelligence, specifically. Nottingham doesn't appear to touch on intelligence at all, and devotes its time to counter-insurgency, terrorism, case studies via military strategic thought rather than wholly intell gathering. Kings has the widest spread of available options for security-related modules plus a respectable amount of intellgence options; so it's a comparatively flexible degree though you only have 2 options. LSE-IR is general, very broad, and its core course is not aimed to either Security/Strategy/or Intell and you only have 2 course options (4 if you take half-units). Of which, only a few on their catalogue are devoted to a strategic/security angle (most from a specific regional area than broad theory). Aber's MScEcon let's you choose either Intell or Security as cores. Aber's workload may be a bit on the intensive side as you have to take 6 modules in total. But a good number of these modules view both themes in a historical perspective.
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    Well if you fancy studying history of Intelligence go for Kings or Nottingham
    If you want something right to the point and not just some boring history lectures, with no doubts head for Brunel !!!. Kings is just a name that looks OK on a diploma and there is nothing more to it.
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    You might want to give some reasoning for you wildly sweeping statements. Do you have direct experience of any of these courses ?

    TBD

    (Original post by Arreat)
    Well if you fancy studying history of Intelligence go for Kings or Nottingham
    If you want something right to the point and not just some boring history lectures, with no doubts head for Brunel !!!. Kings is just a name that looks OK on a diploma and there is nothing more to it.
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    This is really interesting. I am interested in this subject, but unfortunately my studies must be either distance learning or modular (week long). I have looked in detail at the KCL "Air Power in Modern World" which seems very interesting, but what I don't know is how much of the material for these kind of courses is purely analysis of history and politics rather than forward-looking practical analysis or research of the methods or technologies (which is what interests me as an engineer).

    TBD

    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    A lot of the courses mentioned differ substantially to how much weight is given to Intelligence, Security or History modules. Unless what you're primarily banking on is "the name" for general employment; take a close look at the course structure of each MA. If you're set on going to a particular industry or sector, you need to consider if the modules each MA offers will be useful to you.

    Brunel is very intelligence-heavy and has specialized itself very narrowly which could be an asset if you're aim is to gain as much knowledge as you can on intelligence, specifically. Nottingham doesn't appear to touch on intelligence at all, and devotes its time to counter-insurgency, terrorism, case studies via military strategic thought rather than wholly intell gathering. Kings has the widest spread of available options for security-related modules plus a respectable amount of intellgence options; so it's a comparatively flexible degree though you only have 2 options. LSE-IR is general, very broad, and its core course is not aimed to either Security/Strategy/or Intell and you only have 2 course options (4 if you take half-units). Of which, only a few on their catalogue are devoted to a strategic/security angle (most from a specific regional area than broad theory). Aber's MScEcon let's you choose either Intell or Security as cores. Aber's workload may be a bit on the intensive side as you have to take 6 modules in total. But a good number of these modules view both themes in a historical perspective.
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    (Original post by TBD)
    This is really interesting. I am interested in this subject, but unfortunately my studies must be either distance learning or modular (week long). I have looked in detail at the KCL "Air Power in Modern World" which seems very interesting, but what I don't know is how much of the material for these kind of courses is purely analysis of history and politics rather than forward-looking practical analysis or research of the methods or technologies (which is what interests me as an engineer).

    TBD
    If you're looking for practical analysis or technological applications/research on airpower and conventional war tech, I strongly reccommend you look at Cranfield University. I'm not sure if they do things modular, you can contact them about that issue. But Cranfield has both practical science-based courses useful for the defense industries (should be right up your alley as an engineer) and also has courses on the more manegerial aspect/business side of defense contracting.
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    Yeah I have looked in great detail at the Cranfield offerings, such as Human Factors and Safety Assessment in Aeronautics, Operational Research and similar. The Defence related courses are run at what was (or maybe still is) the Defence Management College at Shrivenham.I was there many years ago for a few weeks being woken with a cup of tea

    I note that some of the lecturers on the KCL War Studies courses are also delivering material at Shrivenham (or is it the other way round?). I am particularly interested in the Information Operations which is offered as a certificate at Cranfield although it may be a bit too limiting for a civilian...

    Most of the Cranfield courses that are part time require attendance in blocks of at least one week, and the modules on many of them are run only once per year without substitution. It's a bit difficult to combine with a day job.

    The KCL Air Power in Modern World and War Power offer complete flexibility as distance learning, and interesting subject matter. Obviously there are no real networking opportunities. I recently completed a part time modular Masters in Air Transport and I would say the value of such interaction should not be underestimated. Unfortunately because of the nature of my business, I can't commit to blocks of attendance....

    TBD








    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    If you're looking for practical analysis or technological applications/research on airpower and conventional war tech, I strongly reccommend you look at Cranfield University. I'm not sure if they do things modular, you can contact them about that issue. But Cranfield has both practical science-based courses useful for the defense industries (should be right up your alley as an engineer) and also has courses on the more manegerial aspect/business side of defense contracting.
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    (Original post by Patersnak27)
    Principessa,

    If you are serious considering an MA in Intelligence and Security Studies, and you choose LSE over Brunel, you will regret it. LSE may be in a nicer area with a bigger name, but the degree at Brunel is unquestionably the best of the bunch. It provides, in an academic setting, the best opportunity to practically use the information you are taught. The degree at King's is much more historically based, while Brunel's is based on providing the knowledge necessary to succeed in today's intelligence community.

    How do I know this? I myself am an international student at Brunel, obtaining my MA in Intelligence and Security Studies. I has the choice between King's, LSE (for IR), and Brunel, and I chose Brunel. If your goal is to be a PhD candidate a year after you get you MA, go to King's, LSE, etc. If you want to work in the intelligence community, go to Brunel.
    (Original post by CSB)
    Principessa,

    The MA course at Brunel, Intelligence and Security Studies, offers the best blend of teaching. Although the course at King's is good, it's heavily reliant on teaching from a theoretical and historical perspective.

    There are these elements on the course at Brunel of course, but there is a mix with practical applications as well. I looked at the other courses you mentioned and I decided that Brunel's was by far the best option, given what they cover and the manner in which they do it. I'm sure if you compare the various course outlines you'll see which one is the most interesting!

    It was a while ago that you posted - but if you (or anyone else for that matter) want info on the Intelligence and Security Studies MA at Brunel, send me a message.
    (Original post by Arreat)
    Well if you fancy studying history of Intelligence go for Kings or Nottingham
    If you want something right to the point and not just some boring history lectures, with no doubts head for Brunel !!!. Kings is just a name that looks OK on a diploma and there is nothing more to it.
    Um, is this your idea of subterfuge? :confused:
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    Does anyone have any updates on this?

    Anyone else who has studied at Brunel?

    Also, what would be the difference between an IR and an intelligence based Masters What I mean is, is it not a better idea to specialise (especially at Masters level) in a specific field rather than just a broad area such as IR. I am sure many of the intelligence modules would be offered at most IR courses of study.

    Appreciate any comments.
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    I am a lecturer in the Brunel intelligence program. Take a look at the website, faculty and taught components; compare them to what you find in other programs. Decide which is the best fit for you.

    Each security-oriented postgraduate program has strengths and weaknesses. Each has a comparative advantage relative to other programs, usually based on the knowledge/experience of the faculty. There is no "best" program; rather, each student should decide which program is the best for him or her, depending on what he or she wants to learn and where he or she wants to go after graduating.

    For example, KCL teaches intelligence studies within a broader security framework. Brunel, on the other hand, focuses more on intelligence studies as a specialization. Which approach would be best for you? Or would you prefer a more historical approach to intelligence studies, as per the faculty specializations at Aberystwyth (intell studies specialization) or Warwick (intelligence studies within international security framework)?

    Also, where you go after acquiring the degree is up to you. A prior poster was incorrect in describing Brunel's intelligence program as a better foundation for those who want to get jobs in the field whereas KCL is better for doctoral work. Instead, I could easily argue that KCL's MA in Intelligence and International Security could help someone get a job, while Brunel's MA in Intelligence and Security Studies could provide the academic foundation to go for further (doctoral) study. In fact, Brunel has a handful of students pursuing doctoral studies with intelligence studies specialization. It would be better to say that either program could help prepare you for whichever direction you'd like to go in the future...

    Similarly, the question you ask about specialization (IR versus intelligence studies) depends on (1) the interests of the student in question, and (2) purpose for taking the course.

    See writings that address intelligence studies as a postgraduate specialization:

    About Intell Studies in UK:
    Goodman, Michael S. "Studying and Teaching About Intelligence: The Approach in the United Kingdom." Studies in Intelligence 50, no. 2 (2006): 57-65.

    About Intell Studies at KCL:
    Goodman, Michael S., and Sir David Omand. "What Analysts Need to Understand: The King's Intelligence Studies Program." Studies in Intelligence 52, no. 4 (Dec. 2008): 1-12.

    About Intell Studies Brunel:
    Davies, Philip H. J. "Assessment BASE: Simulating National Intelligence Assessment in a Graduate Course." International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 19, no. 4 (Winter 2006-2007): 721-736.

    About Intell Studies in Canada/US:
    Rudner, Martin. "Intelligence Studies in Higher Education: Capacity-Building to Meet Societal Demand." International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 22, no. 1 (Spring 2009): 110-130.
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    (Original post by spm8p)
    I am a lecturer in the Brunel intelligence program. Take a look at the website, faculty and taught components; compare them to what you find in other programs. Decide which is the best fit for you.
    ...
    Thanks for this great post! Although I am having trouble locating the literature you kindly suggested.

    I am really struggling to pick between a more security based MA Vs a more intelligenced based one Vs one that focusses on terrorism.

    I think that although I have managed to narrow it down to these three I am really struggling to define clear boundaries between the three.

    Would a terrorism MA ignore the various apparatus used in implementing security/counterterrorist policy? Is intelligence the tool and the other two the outcomes?

    I hate to say I am slightly lost as to what these specialisms actually refer to, as it seems as all these three specialisations coexist.
    If anyone has any links to literature please do share.
 
 
 

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