Apostrophe Poetic Device

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TheAthena
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#1
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I am doing an analysis of The Tyger by William Blake, and don't know whether to describe it as an apostrophe or not.
The definition of an apostrophe is 'a direct address to an inanimate object, absent person, or abstract concept; talking to something that cannot respond'.
The tiger that is being questioned by Blake is not inanimate, or a concept etc. but IS something that cannot technically respond in the way Blake is asking it to in the poem.
So- can u call The Tyger, an apostrophe?
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TSR Learn Together
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pseudonymegg
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(Original post by TheAthena)
I am doing an analysis of The Tyger by William Blake, and don't know whether to describe it as an apostrophe or not.
The definition of an apostrophe is 'a direct address to an inanimate object, absent person, or abstract concept; talking to something that cannot respond'.
The tiger that is being questioned by Blake is not inanimate, or a concept etc. but IS something that cannot technically respond in the way Blake is asking it to in the poem.
So- can u call The Tyger, an apostrophe?
Hi, I've studied this poem, you could argue that it is a concept and therefore an apostrophe, since Blake uses the Tyger as a metaphor for all the misery in the world, contrasting it with the Lamb. Blake contemplates 'did he who make the lamb make you' (something like that) how could a god create something so pure and innocent like the lamb alongside something as powerful and as harmful as the tyger.
The questions are mostly rhetorical, Blake is asking the audience to reflect on these propounding questions - so you could argue it is an apostrophe
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TheAthena
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(Original post by pseudonymegg)
Hi, I've studied this poem, you could argue that it is a concept and therefore an apostrophe, since Blake uses the Tyger as a metaphor for all the misery in the world, contrasting it with the Lamb. Blake contemplates 'did he who make the lamb make you' (something like that) how could a god create something so pure and innocent like the lamb alongside something as powerful and as harmful as the tyger.
The questions are mostly rhetorical, Blake is asking the audience to reflect on these propounding questions - so you could argue it is an apostrophe
Thank you! I am calling it an apostrophe in my analysis. Considering that the tyger itself is technically an 'abstract concept', like you say, it would be an apostrophe I suppose. Thanks again!
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