If people lived forever, would a god be needed? Watch

Maker
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Let say in the near future, we can devise a way to live forever. for example, down loading our consciousness to a computer or android where we can live as before and never die.

We could then do without a god because we would never die and one of the main functions of a deity is to provide a place to go when we die would not be needed.
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kelefi
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yep.

god is, when it boils down to the basics, someone/something who may or may not exist created to improve the moral behaviour of the masses. no death = no fear of punishment. therefore no death= no religion!
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Shabalala
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Religion would certainly be less influential but many people would still feel the need to find an explanation of our existence so religion would still exist unfortunetley.
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Tengo
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(Original post by kelefi)
yep.

god is, when it boils down to the basics, someone/something who may or may not exist created to improve the moral behaviour of the masses. no death = no fear of punishment. therefore no death= no religion!
Improve moral behaviour? Do you have any functional understanding of the history of every religious institution... well, ever? Hinduism and the dharmic enforcing of the caste system, Islam, warlord-Mohammad's wandering tribe of murderers, Christianity and systemic pedophilia, countless genocides, crusades, impositions, witch burnings etc.
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kelefi
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yes but down to the CORE it would improve moral behaviour. these events occured ages after the religions supposedly started as time progressed. AH nvm, im relaxing now
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by Tengo)
Improve moral behaviour? Do you have any functional understanding of the history of every religious institution... well, ever? Hinduism and the dharmic enforcing of the caste system, Islam, warlord-Mohammad's wandering tribe of murderers, Christianity and systemic pedophilia, countless genocides, crusades, impositions, witch burnings etc.
The caste system is a social system, the varna system is Vedic. Not dharmic.

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Commercial Paper
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Can people on these threads please stop conflating these key issues:

If there is no religion that does not mean there is no God.
If there is a religion, that does not mean there is a God.

In summary, religion =/= God.

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Tengo
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(Original post by Ggmu!)
The caste system is a social system, the varna system is Vedic. Not dharmic.

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I say dharmic because it refers to the religious dogma of universal law, if one believes in an inherent social justice then one accepts the place society gives one within it. Would you argue that Hinduism does not support the caste system?
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by Tengo)
I say dharmic because it refers to the religious dogma of universal law, if one believes in an inherent social justice then one accepts the place society gives one within it. Would you argue that Hinduism does not support the caste system?
That is only in the Vedas, such a concept doesn't apply to other dharmic faiths, does it? Buddhism or Sikhism wouldn't accept a caste system, so it's not 'dharmic'.

There is a varna system which can change based on your life as per the Vedas.

Any other system is social. There are 4 varnas from the Vedas and that is it.

Hinduism does support it in India however there is not much of a caste system abroad with Hindus.

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Tengo
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(Original post by Ggmu!)
That is only in the Vedas, such a concept doesn't apply to other dharmic faiths, does it? Buddhism or Sikhism wouldn't accept a caste system, so it's not 'dharmic'.

There is a varna system which can change based on your life as per the Vedas.

Any other system is social. There are 4 varnas from the Vedas and that is it.

Hinduism does support it in India however there is not much of a caste system abroad with Hindus.

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I'm arguing from the position of Marx and Nietzsche that religion unilaterally forces individuals to accept their place on earth socially, and embrace passivity and weakness - there is a fundamental glorification of weakness, as in Christianity; 'Blessed are the meek'. I think Hinduism is such a complex and difficult to gauge religion that it's hard to pin any particular position on it, but that also means that it's difficult for the faith to take any particular position, in which case what's the point? However, I'd argue that the history of the religion contradicts the modernistic sentiment that the religion is really quite peaceful. Are you Hindu yourself?
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by Tengo)
I'm arguing from the position of Marx and Nietzsche that religion unilaterally forces individuals to accept their place on earth socially, and embrace passivity and weakness - there is a fundamental glorification of weakness, as in Christianity; 'Blessed are the meek'. I think Hinduism is such a complex and difficult to gauge religion that it's hard to pin any particular position on it, but that also means that it's difficult for the faith to take any particular position, in which case what's the point? However, I'd argue that the history of the religion contradicts the modernistic sentiment that the religion is really quite peaceful. Are you Hindu yourself?
Ah, I can agree with that, however.

What about the history of Hinduism suggests it's not peaceful as made out to be?

Agnostic, but I still like Hinduism.

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Tengo
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(Original post by Ggmu!)
Ah, I can agree with that, however.

What about the history of Hinduism suggests it's not peaceful as made out to be?

Agnostic, but I still like Hinduism.

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Well I mostly refer to the conflicts with Islam and it's followers - and Buddhism, as well the traditions of pedophilia (marriage between the very young and very old) and systemic rape-culture.
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by Tengo)
Well I mostly refer to the conflicts with Islam and it's followers - and Buddhism, as well the traditions of pedophilia (marriage between the very young and very old) and systemic rape-culture.
Traditions of paedophilia and rape?

Bit silly, don't you think? It seems you want it to be a part of religion, yet this disappears in Hindus outside of India, so it's more of a social than religious issue.

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Tengo
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(Original post by Ggmu!)
Traditions of paedophilia and rape?

Bit silly, don't you think? It seems you want it to be a part of religion, yet this disappears in Hindus outside of India, so it's more of a social than religious issue.
When a country's fundamental culture is religious, it's reasonable to attribute the culture to the religion, at least in part, right? Especially since historically Hinduism has had such an influence in the society and laws of the nation. Hindus outside of India are living in cultures that lack that historical tie, right?
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by Tengo)
When a country's fundamental culture is religious, it's reasonable to attribute the culture to the religion, at least in part, right? Especially since historically Hinduism has had such an influence in the society and laws of the nation. Hindus outside of India are living in cultures that lack that historical tie, right?
I see your point and I agree, to an extent. But there have been periods when Hinduism (despite but being called Hinduism at the time) was the primary force and women enjoyed a fairer position in society than they did now, will you attribute that to Hinduism? I understand this doesn't undo the current situation, but my point is if that such a spectrum of situations are possible in a Hindu influenced culture, what is the point of attributing something to Hinduism?

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Jjj90
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There's more to religion than having somewhere nice to go when you're dead.
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