quirksy
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Hey guys,

I'm planning to apply for Medicine 2015 entry, but am wondering what kind of extra reading I should be doing over Summer.

I've been reading generic medicine books like 'Trust me I'm a Junior Doctor' and Atul Gawande's books, but am unsure about the more sciencey books I should be reading. Should they be very medicine-related, or should I just read up on a biology or chemistry topic I'm interested in? I do have an interest in neuroscience so have been reading about this, so would that be okay, or do I need more?

I was thinking about just reading articles in the BMJ and student BMJ, but not sure if that's enough. I know unis like UCL want you to show how you've pursued interests in science etc.

Thanks in advance!
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ETRC
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Neuroscience and books on more specific areas of medicine will be very helpful to you. I spoke to someone who goes through a lot of medicine applications and he said he gets sick of everyone putting down generic books. They look for specifics.
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06shawm
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(Original post by quirksy)
Hey guys,

I'm planning to apply for Medicine 2015 entry, but am wondering what kind of extra reading I should be doing over Summer.

I've been reading generic medicine books like 'Trust me I'm a Junior Doctor' and Atul Gawande's books, but am unsure about the more sciencey books I should be reading. Should they be very medicine-related, or should I just read up on a biology or chemistry topic I'm interested in? I do have an interest in neuroscience so have been reading about this, so would that be okay, or do I need more?

I was thinking about just reading articles in the BMJ and student BMJ, but not sure if that's enough. I know unis like UCL want you to show how you've pursued interests in science etc.

Thanks in advance!
This is just my opinion but I think this forms quite a small section of your PS and other sections are much more important! I personally didn't read any of the medical journals when I was applying and left that until my interview. Instead, I went to a few lectures surrounding medicine at my local teaching hospital/university about scientific advancements, an example of mine that I included in my PS was showing how survival rates are increasing for heart transplant surgery using organ care systems compared to the more traditional methods. I think this shows the 'pursued interests in science' more effectively than I have read a book on...

Also if you have undertaken a scientific research project like EPQ or perspectives on science this would have more weight plus these type of things are likely to be asked about at interview in which you can prepare for questions on.
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Hype en Ecosse
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Don't read the BMJ. It's dreadfully boring. Stick to pop books written for a lay audience. Things by Oliver Sacks, Dawkins, Jerry Coyne. I'm currently reading a cool book called "Zoobiquity", which is about what human medicine can learn from veterinary medicine.
A good "generic medicine" book series is "Confessions of a GP" - I absolutely love this!

You also shouldn't be reading books "for your application" - you should be reading for your own interest. You have very little space on your PS to write things, and things like books and lectures should only make up a small part of that, and honestly doesn't add all that much. Read for fun, not because you feel like you have to.
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shumen9523
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Hey there,
I would like to recommend a few more things as well. Since you're interested in neurology, I would recommend reading "The man who mistook his wife for a hat" or "Hallucinations" by Oliver Sachs. These books are very well-written and I think they you'll develop further interest in neurology as you read through them.
I would also recommend 'Bad Science' and/or 'Bad pharma' by Ben Goldacre. These books are mainly concerned with evidence-based medicine. I've read Bad Science and I found that the book is both informative and entertaining.
I would also recommend reading "Medical ethics: a very short introduction". It introduces you to the basics in medical ethics so it can be helpful when you prepare for interviews (especially if you don't have
A strong background in medical ethics).
You can check out the reviews of these books on Amazon. For me, I think these books are definitely worth reading.
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t()m
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Oliver sacks is good, I found it especially useful as I was able to relate to it neurosurgery work experience. So maybe read something related to your work experience planned in the future or already done.
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Sambo2
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(Original post by quirksy)
Hey guys,

I'm planning to apply for Medicine 2015 entry, but am wondering what kind of extra reading I should be doing over Summer.

I've been reading generic medicine books like 'Trust me I'm a Junior Doctor' and Atul Gawande's books, but am unsure about the more sciencey books I should be reading. Should they be very medicine-related, or should I just read up on a biology or chemistry topic I'm interested in? I do have an interest in neuroscience so have been reading about this, so would that be okay, or do I need more?

I was thinking about just reading articles in the BMJ and student BMJ, but not sure if that's enough. I know unis like UCL want you to show how you've pursued interests in science etc.

Thanks in advance!
Don't bother with anything more than the BBC Science section - no need to read any journals, certainly not the BMJ, for a start you won't understand any of it and it will be incredibly dull. Read everything by Ben Goldacre - his two books are excellent and make great chat for interviews.
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