Ana81
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If so what good has it done you?

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NX172
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Did a CCNA when I was 18. Didn't think I needed it but it landed me a job where I design software for network engineers to monitor telecomm networks. Clients include Airbus, Hewlett Packard, major banks and ISPs.

CCNA is pretty basic but gives you strong fundamentals to work with networks
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ScouseEmma28
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(Original post by NX172)
Did a CCNA when I was 18. Didn't think I needed it but it landed me a job where I design software for network engineers to monitor telecomm networks. Clients include Airbus, Hewlett Packard, major banks and ISPs.

CCNA is pretty basic but gives you strong fundamentals to work with networks
I was thinking of pursuing the Cisco quals route. My degree is in Business but wanted to do Msc in CS - not sure how worthless/beneficial this would be as i want to change careers. I would like to specialise in Network Security....
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Binary Freak
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(Original post by ScouseEmma28)
I was thinking of pursuing the Cisco quals route. My degree is in Business but wanted to do Msc in CS - not sure how worthless/beneficial this would be as i want to change careers. I would like to specialise in Network Security....
If you're looking to get into network security (much alike myself) then I would personally recommend going for entry level certifications first.

I'd start off with the Network+ and Security+, these will provide some foundation knowledge of security which you can use to get an entry level job, then I'd recommend going for the CCNA R&S and CCNA Security. and then go for the CASP.

I've took the route of starting off with the CCNA, so in a few weeks I'll starting the entry level certifications.

I'm self studying for all my certifications since I can cram in all the information within about a month (it's what I done for my CCNA)

If you do intend on self studying then you should get the Michael Meyers books for the entry level certifications

For the Cisco qualifications go for the Wendell Odom book and perhaps CBT Nuggets training videos or INE. you should also think of using GNS3 to accompany your studies, or getting a physical network lab (you will NOT pass CCNA without having configured equipment)
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ScouseEmma28
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Incredibly useful - thank you.

So you believe Cisco quals would be more beneficial than getting a Masters in Computer Science? I know CS is a broad PG programme, but I assumed that undertaking a Masters would be more helpful when applying for jobs.

I've got £5k to play with, so want to invest wisely...
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Ana81
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(Original post by ScouseEmma28)
Incredibly useful - thank you.

So you believe Cisco quals would be more beneficial than getting a Masters in Computer Science? I know CS is a broad PG programme, but I assumed that undertaking a Masters would be more helpful when applying for jobs.

I've got £5k to play with, so want to invest wisely...
Cisco quals are absolutely useless without experience.. look it up. I would like to do it just for something to put on my cv.

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Binary Freak
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I wouldn't even compare the two,

The only commonality between the two is that you'll need to get experience with both of them.

A degree usually means outdated knowledge, yeah sure, you can do research, but in 4 years, will you remember any of it? the chances are unlikely.. With a certification that you're required to renew it demonstrates current knowledge that is up to date with the field.. If you don't want to enter the networking sector then the CCNA will be near useless.

If you're so indecisive about it, then why not do both? Sure you'll have a few months delay for achieving unless you really have time to spare.. If you do the CCNA full time, then it shouldn't take you longer than 4 weeks, if it does, then you really need to understand the content better.

My lecturer has a BSc in Philosophy, he got his CCNA after university and he worked in network/security consultancy.
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Ana81
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I have an MTA exam booked but have pushed it back twice now through lack of time to study

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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
I have an MTA exam booked but have pushed it back twice now through lack of time to study

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Which MTA are you taking?
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Ana81
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
Which MTA are you taking?
windows operating system fundamentals

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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
windows operating system fundamentals

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Ahh good luck.. I'll give you a tip for the Microsoft track..

They're relatively easy, however, there will sometimes be a load questions which will be based around one topic (make sure you know each topic thoroughly.. Finally, once you've done a question it's unlikely that you can go back on it, whereas some other vendors allow this.

I had a friend that done Microsoft up until the MCSA level, but he eventually swapped over to others (he told me about this because I was thinking of doing MCSA Windows Server 2012.. I decided to go with others, though I might go for it at a later time)

Are you self teaching for the MTA are do you attend training courses?
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Ana81
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
Ahh good luck.. I'll give you a tip for the Microsoft track..

They're relatively easy, however, there will sometimes be a load questions which will be based around one topic (make sure you know each topic thoroughly.. Finally, once you've done a question it's unlikely that you can go back on it, whereas some other vendors allow this.

I had a friend that done Microsoft up until the MCSA level, but he eventually swapped over to others (he told me about this because I was thinking of doing MCSA Windows Server 2012.. I decided to go with others, though I might go for it at a later time)

Are you self teaching for the MTA are do you attend training courses?
self teaching I bought a book and did my research, I'm probs going to either go for the networking one after or comptia a+. I'm trying to give it my best shot even in the process of reducing my hours at work by 75% so I can study and learn IT.

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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
self teaching I bought a book and did my research, I'm probs going to either go for the networking one after or comptia a+

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I have the A+ and I studied the MTA Networking Fundamentals (it's definitely a good place to start I think

As for the A+ that was one of the first I got, I REGRET ever buying the book, and taking the exams, the exams aren't even worth the price and the majority of the information is outdated, the exam is meant to be based on a more modern operating system (Windows 8.1).. however the study resources were based on Windows XP, it was sickening.. Despite that though, it does provide a very basic understanding of computer systems (the different connectors and tools etcetera)

Now they actually make it so you need to recertify (I find it relatively pointless, the exam content is rarely updated and the content itself is based on relatively old technology, the entire purpose of recertifying is to demonstrate an understanding of current technology.. (thankfully they use a credit based system, so that when you get a new certification or recertify something like the CCNA then it provides you with credits which you submit to them to get recertified

I was very surprised to find out that they have a high fail rate

EDIT: Here's a good resource for the CompTIA if you decide to go for it (see here)
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Ana81
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
I have the A+ and I studied the MTA Networking Fundamentals (it's definitely a good place to start I think

As for the A+ that was one of the first I got, I REGRET ever buying the book, and taking the exams, the exams aren't even worth the price and the majority of the information is outdated, the exam is meant to be based on a more modern operating system (Windows 8.1).. however the study resources were based on Windows XP, it was sickening.. Despite that though, it does provide a very basic understanding of computer systems (the different connectors and tools etcetera)

Now they actually make it so you need to recertify (I find it relatively pointless, the exam content is rarely updated and the content itself is based on relatively old technology, the entire purpose of recertifying is to demonstrate an understanding of current technology.. (thankfully they use a credit based system, so that when you get a new certification or recertify something like the CCNA then it provides you with credits which you submit to them to get recertified

I was very surprised to find out that they have a high fail rate

EDIT: Here's a good resource for the CompTIA if you decide to go for it (see here)
so do you not recommend the A+ then? someone told me I should learn the content but the certificate is pointless.. Yeah got that bookmarked lol

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HappyHylian
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No because I don't want to end up working at McDonalds.
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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
so do you not recommend the A+ then? someone told me I should learn the content but the certificate is pointless.. Yeah got that bookmarked lol

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I suppose it's good to learn the knowledge and not certify (15 year olds have been passing the A+ for a while now, so the value of it is completely gone, the only time someone should have it, is when it's required).. This applies to all of the CompTIA certificates (excluding the CASP)

I regretted even studying for it and certifying.. The amount of time spend on it, I could've got some better certificate

What do you actually aspire to be anyway? (Personally I want to be a network engineer)
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Ana81
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
I suppose it's good to learn the knowledge and not certify (15 year olds have been passing the A+ for a while now, so the value of it is completely gone, the only time someone should have it, is when it's required).. This applies to all of the CompTIA certificates (excluding the CASP)

I regretted even studying for it and certifying.. The amount of time spend on it, I could've got some better certificate

What do you actually aspire to be anyway? (Personally I want to be a network engineer)
same network engineering is my goal but its a dream tbh.. hard to even get a support role these days.

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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
same network engineering is my goal but its a dream tbh.. hard to even get a support role these days.

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Yeah it is, one job will lead to another, and another, that's how most people get there anyway.. More specifically the end goal is a Network Security Engineer, or something along the lines of that anyway

I'm going to go University and during that time I hope to get..
CCNA R&S | CCNA Security | GSEC | SCCP

Then I want to try and land an entry IT job in Network Support and just go from there.. If I knew any better at the time I would've done an Advanced Apprenticeship
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Ana81
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
Yeah it is, one job will lead to another, and another, that's how most people get there anyway.. More specifically the end goal is a Network Security Engineer, or something along the lines of that anyway

I'm going to go University and during that time I hope to get..
CCNA R&S | CCNA Security | GSEC | SCCP

Then I want to try and land an entry IT job in Network Support and just go from there.. If I knew any better at the time I would've done an Advanced Apprenticeship
what are you going to study at uni? this may be a little forward but I would like to continue this discussion over dinner.... joke do you have kik messenger lol?

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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Ana81)
what are you going to study at uni? this may be a little forward but I would like to continue this discussion over dinner.... joke do you have kik messenger lol?

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I'll be studying BSc Network Management and Security

and haha, I only have Skype and Facebook, but I can download Windows Messenger if need be
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