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    I took a gap year. And I haven't really studied chemistry. Which is the course I will be doing at university. I've got two months and I suppose I'll just cramp in as much as I can while also trying to relax in summer time. I do genuinely like chemistry and I actually borrowed a book recently from the library.

    Anyway, how was your transition like? Did a lot of A level stuff reappear? I assume the equations will reappear and some important theories and principles. Did your course quickly cover the basics again?
    Thanks
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    I found the transition quite challenging. I was having serious thoughts of dropping out multiple times. If my flatmate didn't help me I think I would've dropped out but I'm glad I didn't. We started off the year doing physical chemistry, and not having done physics, I was already at a disadvantage so I was a little disheartened.

    A decent amount of stuff came up from A level - stuff from AS like ionisation energy and trends in the periodic table, A2 stuff like gibbs energy, entropy, lattice energy, a lot of organic stuff and much more. There weren't a lot of equations at A level, and they all assume you can remember them by heart, as really, the equations you learn like gibbs energy and stuff is so simple compared to the equations you have to learn throughout the year...

    The course covered the basics quickly and actually had reasonable explanations as opposed to your teachers' answer of 'it's just the way it is' so the theories make a lot more sense.

    May I ask where you're starting this September?
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    Huddersfield. Yes I could have gone to a top 20 or 30 (unconditional offer) but based on my course preference and course material I chose huddersfield (which is on par with my other choices in chemistry standings).

    What??? Physics? Oh dear. My ambition has always been chemistry and university so I hope I won't be inclined to dropping out. I suppose I'll skim through the a level chemistry stuff over summer then.
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    (Original post by Hitashami)
    Huddersfield. Yes I could have gone to a top 20 or 30 (unconditional offer) but based on my course preference and course material I chose huddersfield (which is on par with my other choices in chemistry standings).

    What??? Physics? Oh dear. My ambition has always been chemistry and university so I hope I won't be inclined to dropping out. I suppose I'll skim through the a level chemistry stuff over summer then.
    Ah don't worry, I just started off on the wrong foot so I'm sure you'll be fine. Just try to do work throughout the year. Easier said than done...
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    I remembered lots of my A-level so generally, it was fine. Lots of people remembered a bit less though

    Given the gap year it would be very helpful for you to review over your a-level work, really. The university will teach you what you need to know, but what they expect you to know is a-level standard. Look over organic stuff particularly - mechanisms, naming, functional groups and their conversions (i.e. alcohol to ester, to aldehyde etc.) as that is all used still. As above the general trends for stuff like lattice enthalpies, ionisations etc.
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    Oh, sounds like quite a bit of AS level stuff is covered as well. I'm thinking whether I should revise from the huge fat book or the revision guides.... They do seem to have the important stuff.
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    (Original post by Hitashami)
    Oh, sounds like quite a bit of AS level stuff is covered as well. I'm thinking whether I should revise from the huge fat book or the revision guides.... They do seem to have the important stuff.
    Probably the revision guide I guess, it will be easier to pick out the points. You just need a good overview, and some of that material you might not need until summer time depending how the modules fall so it doesn't need to be exam-ready at the front of your mind. I wouldn't get bogged down in tiny details from the huge book too much because they're not...necessarily entirely correct. If you think you've forgotten large chunks then you might need sections of the large book, but hopefully the revision guide should jog your memory!

    It would be really handy to draw yourself some sort of chart for converting between functional groups. It's something dead quick you can look back at, and redraw later on with stuff you've learned too. Put the reaction conditions on there too.

    Does the bigger textbook have practice questions in? They might be useful to do, just making sure you can calculate moles and convert units confidently - stuff like that.

    Edit: oh! and look back on how to assign NMR/IR/MS as you'll do that in the labs with the products you make
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    Yeah good idea. Revision book seems to be the way to go. But ill keep the big book in CASE something comes up and I don't get it. This feels efficient. Can't wait to get stuck into organic. It's the reason I love chemistry. Without that I'd probably just edge away from it... into the unknown where nothing can get me back, back into existence, back into that which I solemnly belong, I cannot help this, for my heart is the judge of my fate, and if I don't listen to its hints, I will remain in searching in illusion.

    My fall back career choice is poetry.

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