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    I've now been having multiple panic attacks. Never before have I suffered through one. I've always found it hard to make commitments and when lots is going on or changing I get very anxious. Now that we've got our results soon, it's almost as though something will always set of the panicky side in me. I feel like I tried so hard for the exams but I still feel as though I have so much pressure on me to do good. I feel like so many things are changing and so much is piling up in my mind, exam results, college or sixth form, i just started a new job (which doesn't help because i'm an extremely shy person), i'm also just a generally stressed and anxious person.

    Does anyone know why these started and if there is anyway to get them under control at least.
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    I used to have them and mild case of agoraphobia when I was much younger. I'd literally hyperventilate at the door. Due to my mum's lack of sensitivity I had to get over it which explains my horrible social ineptitude, I am forced to get on though I am basically dying inside I did a lot of things to cure I even blew cannibus but yea think about what is making you so insecure inside or with your surroundings and disempower them, then see if that helps. =\
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    (Original post by AyanaRulesz)
    I used to have them and mild case of agoraphobia when I was much younger. I'd literally hyperventilate at the door. Due to my mum's lack of sensitivity I had to get over it which explains my horrible social ineptitude, I am forced to get on though I am basically dying inside I did a lot of things to cure I even blew cannibus but yea think about what is making you so insecure inside or with your surroundings and disempower them, then see if that helps. =\
    Thanks, I presume that my family don't even know that I get them because they developed during exam time mainly for me and I never had any before then so I was at home a lot anyway and when ever I feel one coming on the only thing I do is remind my self to get out of the room i'm in and to go to my bedroom that way i'm alone and I can't deal with them around people, it makes me even more anxious.
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    (Original post by Lottie006)
    Thanks, I presume that my family don't even know that I get them because they developed during exam time mainly for me and I never had any before then so I was at home a lot anyway and when ever I feel one coming on the only thing I do is remind my self to get out of the room i'm in and to go to my bedroom that way i'm alone and I can't deal with them around people, it makes me even more anxious.
    I have it around ppl, let them know. I'll pass out right there. But these days especially as I'm in Uni and working I have to hold it together. Otherwise I'd stay inside. But after my teen yrs and high school I transformed in and out and took seize of my life. Don't let it control you, control the panic
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    The best thing to do whenever you feel as though things are building up too much in a specific moment is to take yourself out of the moment itself. Step back, remove yourself from the environment when possible and take deep breaths. I tend to treat my anxiety as if I am comforting a tiny creature that is scared, reassuringly saying that things will be okay and that the problem isn't so extreme. Whenever you have or believe you are about to have a panic attack, the best thing to do to calm yourself down is to take deep breaths - this is because when you feel stressed out your body automatically goes into fight or flight mode because it fears it is in danger and so you become oxygen deprived as your body desperately attempts to pass oxygen around the body to ensure that it continues to function correctly in order to either fight against the threat or fly away from it (similar to how when you're under water for too long your body thinks it is drowning and so desperation kicks in and you feel a strict need to breathe, even while under water). I find it easiest to breathe in deeply for 6 seconds, hold the breath for 7 seconds and then exhale for 8. Focus on something calming, maybe download calming sounds onto your phone or ipod etc..., something you know is soothing for you.
 
 
 
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