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What percentage of blame, if at all any, rests with the victim during rape? Watch

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    The other thread got me thinking. Many people argue victims of rape share some blame for dressing provocatively and purposely turning men or giving the impression they're up for sex. It comes back to the infamous car analogy where by leaving valuables on show in a car attracts attention and you share some blame when someone steals them from your car, the same is true with dressing provocatively and getting raped.

    This seems outrageous. Is there any justification for putting some blame on rape victim or indeed any circumstances where a rape victim is partly to blame?
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    There are certainly potential senarios where I would put blame on the victim, but these would be very rare. Typically there is no blame on the victims at all. This applies to most crimes as well.

    That's not to say that the victim may have made some bad judgement calls which lead up to it, but they aren't moral errors.
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    No blame should be put on the victim. People have a right to dress and act how they want. No one's asking the guy to go rape them.
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    No blame should be put on the victim.
    However you can reduce your odds of getting raped. Encouraging women to do so should not be taken as in any way condemning women, but accepting that we live in an unpleasant world.
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    No blame should be put on the victims, but they should be made aware of measures they should have taken that could have prevented it.

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    (Original post by TheAnusFiles)
    No blame should be put on the victim.
    However you can reduce your odds of getting raped. Encouraging women to do so should not be taken as in any way condemning women, but accepting that we live in an unpleasant world.
    Seems fair but I fear you'll have some Feminazis jumping on you for that :lol:
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    None what so ever. Men should be taught not to rape, rather than women being taught not to get raped - only those who commit rape can completely prevent it from happening, no matter what the victim wears, where they walk, or what time they travel at.
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    (Original post by This Is Matt)
    Seems fair but I fear you'll have some Feminazis jumping on you for that :lol:
    I wouldn't "jump" on it, but I would say such an attitude however well-intentioned is harmful because it leads to rape victims blaming themselves as well as contributing to a culture where men believe that a woman somehow deserves to be raped if she decides not to take such precautions.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    I wouldn't "jump" on it, but I would say such an attitude however well-intentioned is harmful because it leads to rape victims blaming themselves as well as contributing to a culture where men believe that a woman somehow deserves to be raped if she decides not to take such precautions.
    Whilst I agree there should not be an attitude claiming women deserve to be raped or encouragement to force victims to blame themself, there should be an acceptance around acting in a certain way reduces your chances of getting raped.
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    (Original post by This Is Matt)
    Whilst I agree there should not be an attitude claiming women deserve to be raped or encouragement to force victims to blame themself, there should be an acceptance around acting in a certain way reduces your chances of getting raped.
    It's just a very fine line between the two. If you tell a woman, for instance, she is less likely to get raped if she doesn't wear a short skirt, that has the logical conclusion that wearing a short skirt increases your chances of being raped. And if you're saying that you can see how small the jump is to the idea that a woman wearing a short skirt is at least partly to blame for her rape - after all, it may not have happened if she hadn't worn it! This does unfortunately mean such a victim is more likely to make that connection, blame herself and suffer mentally as a result, actually increasing the pain she suffers. In addition to that, it suggests rape is about sex and sexual desire, when in reality that is at most secondary to it being about power and entitlement.
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    (Original post by RHyoudon'kno)
    No blame should be put on the victim. People have a right to dress and act how they want. No one's asking the guy to go rape them.
    This...

    (Original post by samba)
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    This...

    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    None what so ever. Men should be taught not to rape, rather than women being taught not to get raped - only those who commit rape can completely prevent it from happening, no matter what the victim wears, where they walk, or what time they travel at.
    ...and this.

    No blame whatsoever should be attributed to the victim of rape...whatever she's (/he's) wearing, wherever and when she(/he) is travelling, if applicable. 100% of the blame goes to the man (or woman) who cannot control himself (/herself), or who doesn't understand the meaning of 'no'.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's just a very fine line between the two. If you tell a woman, for instance, she is less likely to get raped if she doesn't wear a short skirt, that has the logical conclusion that wearing a short skirt increases your chances of being raped. And if you're saying that you can see how small the jump is to the idea that a woman wearing a short skirt is at least partly to blame for her rape - after all, it may not have happened if she hadn't worn it! This does unfortunately mean such a victim is more likely to make that connection, blame herself and suffer mentally as a result, actually increasing the pain she suffers. In addition to that, it suggests rape is about sex and sexual desire, when in reality that is at most secondary to it being about power and entitlement.
    I agree in essence but your logic is reduction ad absurdum. Using the same logic, all precautions for all crimes wouldn't take place. There's a promotion of using burglar alarms to prevent robbery so why can't there be promotion of avoiding dark alley ways at night to avoid rape? (dressing in a certain way is different and I agree).
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    There is certainly an argument to be made that here are repercussions to baiting lions with meat, despite what many would have you believe. As some of posted above, women (and men, despite it only being portrayed incorrectly as some sort of conspiracy against women) owe it to themselves to avoid placing themselves in situations that it could occur. If I walk down an alley at night with change chinging in my pocket and I get mugged, theres a certain degree blame to be laid by my feet. If I go to my local bar renowned for brawling (I do) for drinks and get into a fight (I still do) then who is to blame? Of course, to a certain degree, myself.

    To continue my metaphor though, you shouldnt bait lions with meat. Fortunately, we're civilized. We simply aren't lions anymore. And women(or men), I don't feel, should be viewed as meat. They're half of humanities work force and at the risk of sounding sexist I think they provide an emotional and sensitive depth that children might not otherwise benefit from if the world was exclusively men. We have worked together to produce huge structures, enacted protection for the lowest members of our society and conquered what many thought impossible. There really is absolutely no excuse to succumb to barbaric and essentially torturous behaviour to satisfy ones primal desires. In almost every single case, it is entirely the rapists fault for the incidence occuring. It's socially acceptable to go out dressed "asking for it". It's not socially acceptable to rape someone. It is a fallacy, a flaw in logic, to justify doing something socially unacceptable in reaction to or caused by something socially acceptable.

    The blame lies with the rapist. PS, I hate Feminism
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    (Original post by This Is Matt)
    I agree in essence but your logic is reduction ad absurdum. Using the same logic, all precautions for all crimes wouldn't take place. There's a promotion of using burglar alarms to prevent robbery so why can't there be promotion of avoiding dark alley ways at night to avoid rape? (dressing in a certain way is different and I agree).
    Because the effects of rape on its victims are in no way comparable to the effects of burglary, and in any case only in the latter are you telling all potential victims to take a certain course of action. Rather than telling someone not to walk in dark alleys, we should invest more in street lighting.
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    I don't even think wearing revealing clothing generally provokes rape. Rape is, more often than not, about controlling, dominating and hurting another person. Muslim countries, where women literally cover themselves from head to toe, have the highest rape incident rates. There are several instances of old ladies getting raped, etc. I'd say rape is more of a hate crime, not a crime of passion.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Because the effects of rape on its victims are in no way comparable to the effects of burglary, and in any case only in the latter are you telling all potential victims to take a certain course of action. Rather than telling someone not to walk in dark alleys, we should invest more in street lighting.
    But sometimes investing in lighting is just not worth the extra cost. It's just easier to avoid the alley. In an ideal world rape wouldn't happen but unfortunately we aren't in an ideal world.

    Would the woman feel as if she caused/led to the attack or would she feel more angry at herself? There's always that side which think "If only I left 5 minutes later I would not have bumped into the attacker." It's more a sense of regret using hindsight.
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    Ultimately the rapist is the one in position of power and so they exercise free will over whether they rape or not. The victim isn't the one making the choice, the rapist is.

    So the blame goes to the rapist.

    Most of the time people start pointing the finger at women's behaviour - short skirts, being drunk, being promiscuous/flirtatious or whatever, we live in a free society not some Sharia state, if a woman is behaving like this she's not doing anyone else any harm so that's not where the problem is. If a man goes round groping/harassing/sexual assaulting then that's doing someone harm so that's where the problem is.
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    Rape is the only crime where advising people on how to minimize the chance of it happening is dismissed as 'victim blaming'.
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    (Original post by This Is Matt)
    But sometimes investing in lighting is just not worth the extra cost. It's just easier to avoid the alley. In an ideal world rape wouldn't happen but unfortunately we aren't in an ideal world.

    Would the woman feel as if she caused/led to the attack or would she feel more angry at herself? There's always that side which think "If only I left 5 minutes later I would not have bumped into the attacker." It's more a sense of regret using hindsight.
    If it prevent people from being raped, it is worth the cost. No, we will never abolish rape entirely, but we can certainly prevent millions of people from suffering it by overhauling our cultural attitudes to rape. And that is still a very, very good thing.

    Quite possibly both. And that side is far stronger and far more damaging in a society which teaches women to avoid rape, rather than teaching men not to rape, because women are conditioned to believe and accept they are responsible even if that is not explicitly stated. I accept you and the vast majority of other people who do this do so with the best of intentions, but the result is that you cause damage to rape victims rather than preventing them from suffering.
 
 
 
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