park1996
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Hey everyone.

I am quite curious as to how much a 1st year junior doctor earns.

Can anyone fill me in with any details?

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visesh
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In the most junior hospital trainee post (Foundation Year 1) the basic starting salary is £22,636. This increases in Foundation Year 2 to £28,076. For a doctor in specialist training the basic starting salary is £30,002. If the doctor is contracted to work more than 40 hours and/or to work outside 7am-7pm Monday to Friday, they will receive an additional supplement which will normally be between 20% and 50% of basic salary. This supplement is based on the extra hours worked above a 40 hour standard working week and the intensity of the work.
- http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...y-for-doctors/
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hoonosewot
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As above, 22K is base, but in reality most people end up more in the £30k region once out of hours is taken into account. Obviously a very good wage for first year out of uni.
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AnonymousPenguin
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(Original post by hoonosewot)
Obviously a very good wage for first year out of uni.
Well, if you compare it to 3rd year earnings in other careers it's probably a bit below average.
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hoonosewot
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(Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
Well, if you compare it to 3rd year earnings in other careers it's probably a bit below average.
I'd imagine it's probably slightly above average actually. Bear in mind a lot of people don't get a job straight off the bat, and a lot of people never get a graduate level job in their degrees field anyway.

The average graduate starting salary is often reported as 25k, though in reality that's falsely inflated by methodology, it's more like 20k. Even if you assume 25k though, most jobs don't have the rapid wage increase that you see in medicine. From personal experience i can only think of a couple of people who got to better money than that from my friend group.

Hard to find hard data online for 3 years out of uni, but this is 3.5 yrs:

http://www.gradweb.co.uk/The-Future-...es-?feed=blogs

Not the best source, but it says average wage of £30k, but that's including med, dent, archictecture, vet etc, which are >3yr degrees with above average wages. Take those out and the average wage for 3 yr degree grads at 3.5 yrs is probably a bit less.

A lot of people on here get down on junior doctor salaries, and i get the arguments that they should be higher, but when people say that they're bad and that we could easily make more in other fields it's not really true.
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visesh
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It's definitely a comfortable figure, espicially if no family or other financial commitments.
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hslakaal
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(Original post by hoonosewot)
I'd imagine it's probably slightly above average actually. Bear in mind a lot of people don't get a job straight off the bat, and a lot of people never get a graduate level job in their degrees field anyway.

The average graduate starting salary is often reported as 25k, though in reality that's falsely inflated by methodology, it's more like 20k. Even if you assume 25k though, most jobs don't have the rapid wage increase that you see in medicine. From personal experience i can only think of a couple of people who got to better money than that from my friend group.

Hard to find hard data online for 3 years out of uni, but this is 3.5 yrs:

http://www.gradweb.co.uk/The-Future-...es-?feed=blogs

Not the best source, but it says average wage of £30k, but that's including med, dent, archictecture, vet etc, which are >3yr degrees with above average wages. Take those out and the average wage for 3 yr degree grads at 3.5 yrs is probably a bit less.

A lot of people on here get down on junior doctor salaries, and i get the arguments that they should be higher, but when people say that they're bad and that we could easily make more in other fields it's not really true.
I'm going to sound like a total douche, but hear me out.

Most med students have fairly high grades/academic abilities. They'd have been able to get into pretty good universities, had they chosen not to do medicine. Hence, I don't think it'd make much sense to compare the national average graduate salary, but rather the higher ranked, more well paying institutions.

For example:

Look at LSE's self-reported average salaries for econs undergraduates of 40,600. Even if we decrease it by a bit to adjust for the likely-inflated figures, it'd still most likely be a higher salary than a FY1. If you factor in the extra student debt and the extra two years the BA/Sc grads would have been working for, it doesn't exactly counteract the guranteed salary increases of a medical student post FP. In the extra two years (or even if we take it to be just a year, assuming they had some real difficulty in finding a job), that's at least net 50,000 more money than a med graduate.

I am on the side that the medical profession is by no means poorly paid (relative to the entire country), but poorly paid against similarly trained/skilled professionals. BUT, it does have a much higher job security than most other fields. That's the trade-off in my opinion - security vs. pay
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AnonymousPenguin
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(Original post by hslakaal)
I am on the side that the medical profession is by no means poorly paid (relative to the entire country), but poorly paid against similarly trained/skilled professionals. BUT, it does have a much higher job security than most other fields. That's the trade-off in my opinion - security vs. pay
And as a doctor you can work in a hospital in a cheap part of the country. After having a quick glance at Oxford house prices, it seems that might almost be necessity .

There's no way to be a high-flying lawyer/finance professional outside of the big hubs.
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