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Calling all students who went to a grammar sixth form: I need your advice! Watch

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    Hello guys! I've applied to a grammar sixth form and I originally come from a normal school with mixed abilities. I really want to know do you think theres much difference between a normal sixth form or school? Are the people in grammar sixth forms EXTREMELY clever? Or does it contain students who are average?

    My previous post was a similar one to this so soz if you read my previous one
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    I'm in a similar situation. Not sure what to expect tbh, I have started to self teach some of my AS subjects so I don't look like a complete idiot. I'll be interested to hear the replies
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    (Original post by Super199)
    I'm in a similar situation. Not sure what to expect tbh, I have started to self teach some of my AS subjects so I don't look like a complete idiot. I'll be interested to hear the replies

    It's going to be a HUGE change. I went to the induction to the grammar school and of course its wrong to judge by appearance but they looked like geniuses lol!
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    (Original post by Dan.dont)
    It's going to be a HUGE change. I went to the induction to the grammar school and of course its wrong to judge by appearance but they looked like geniuses lol!
    Haha IKR! What grammar school are you going to if you don't mind me asking? May need to compare results of the one I am going to
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    (Original post by Super199)
    Haha IKR! What grammar school are you going to if you don't mind me asking? May need to compare results of the one I am going to
    Sutton Coldfield girls. This is my brothers account which is why it says male on this account btw lol but I'm a girl.
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    I go to a grammar sixth form school

    To be honest, it feels as if you set your target. Aim for 4 As and let your teachers know that and then they do all that they can to help you. That is pretty much it - mostly it is your own motivation regardless of school that gets you the grade.
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    It does vary a bit between grammar schools, some are superselective and some aren't. Most grammar schools select people who manage to pass an intelligence test, some after extensive coaching. Over the next few years some develop into intelligent people and some are fairly average. The range of ability will be slightly different to a comprehensive as they won't have the lowest ability levels. Students tend to have supportive parents who are keen on the idea of education and expect them to work hard.

    So the school will expect high standards of behaviour and dress - but you'll find some who will be straight A students and some who won't be,

    Just seen which school, their most recent results are here http://www.suttcold.bham.sch.uk/down...sults_2013.pdf

    and you can see they don't all get all A grades.
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    depends what you consider extremely clever, but there does tend to be a mix of abilities.
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    damn it, this is so annoying...I has a whole long post typed out for you, explaining everything in great detail, arggh!! my browser just shut down all of a sudden

    let me try again, but this time very quickly. In my experience there was a HUGE, MASSIVE, ENORMOUS difference between comprehensive and grammar. Really huge difference, I'm telling you.

    The people at the grammar school weren't necessarily superhuman super geniuses. They were modest, down to earth people who cared about their education and worked hard. They're civilised and they appreciate the importance of a good education.

    I'm really angry at stupid Firefox...my other comment was so epic if you want more details, let me know anyway
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    damn it, this is so annoying...I has a whole long post typed out for you, explaining everything in great detail, arggh!! my browser just shut down all of a sudden

    let me try again, but this time very quickly. In my experience there was a HUGE, MASSIVE, ENORMOUS difference between comprehensive and grammar. Really huge difference, I'm telling you.

    The people at the grammar school weren't necessarily superhuman super geniuses. They were modest, down to earth people who cared about their education and worked hard. They're civilised and they appreciate the importance of a good education.

    I'm really angry at stupid Firefox...my other comment was so epic if you want more details, let me know anyway
    Gave you a rep for taking your time before and now to reply. And you said that there was a huge difference between comprehensive and grammar and then you said the people were down to earth and modest, does that mean people in the comprehensive school where arrogant?

    And can I ask did you go to a grammar school in B'ham?

    Tanx!
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    (Original post by Dan.dont)
    Gave you a rep for taking your time before and now to reply. And you said that there was a huge difference between comprehensive and grammar and then you said the people were down to earth and modest, does that mean people in the comprehensive school where arrogant?

    And can I ask did you go to a grammar school in B'ham?

    Tanx!
    Thanks for the rep! I attended a grammar school in the south of England (thank GOD I didn't go to school in Birmingham! yuck). I might as well go into it in more detail, I don't mind.

    The comprehensive school that I went to was extremely rough. I don't exaggerate when I use the word extremely. Full of chavs, gnags of thugs. There was literally only 1 other person in my whole year who actually cared about getting good grades. People attended that school not because they cared about getting a good education, but because they were being forced to by the government (parents have to send their children to school, it's the law).

    So, I was surrounded by chavs in the comprehensive school who didn't care at all about studying or getting good grades. I worked hard, got ten A*s in my GCSEs and moved to a grammar school, where I would spend the best 2 years of my life. It was a great experience. This school has a reputation as being one of the very top schools in the entire nation.

    the people at the grammar school aren't what you might expect. They do achieve ridiculously high grades, they take lots and lots of subjects at GCSE and A level, they play musical instruments, they come from relatively affluent backgrounds (middle/middle-upper class). But they're not arrogant in the slightest. They're very modest and down to earth. They're very hard working, they care about receiving a good education because they have their minds on their future. This was clearly a different breed, a completely different species compared to the subhuman specimens in my first school. I fit right in. I loved the atmosphere there. The difference was just so huge, it's hard to put in words.

    All I can say is you should definitely try to move to a grammar school if you can. You will absolutely love it there. And don't be intimidated. In my experience at least, my new classroom peers were really civilised and friendly. People kept to themselves pretty much, they go to class, learn, and that's basically it. The learning environment is amazing, I'm glad I was able to experience it. Such a blissful experience.
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    Some people in my year who used to go to comprehensive schools have said how smart they think people in our school are, and how they actually get on with the work the teacher sets as opposed to messing around and not doing it.
    I've been at a grammar school since year 7 so i'm used to the people around me, and i wouldn't say the majority are super clever or anything, sure there are the select few who are very intelligent, but if you meet the entry requirements to get into the sixth form then you should be fine. Most of the newcomers have seemed to have settled in fine, so don't worry about it
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    in exactly the same position as you atm
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    (Original post by Super199)
    I'm in a similar situation. Not sure what to expect tbh, I have started to self teach some of my AS subjects so I don't look like a complete idiot. I'll be interested to hear the replies
    are you taking maths? if you are how are you prepping for it? I'm taking it and I have literally no idea on what to do
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    Thanks for the rep! I attended a grammar school in the south of England (thank GOD I didn't go to school in Birmingham! yuck). I might as well go into it in more detail, I don't mind.

    The comprehensive school that I went to was extremely rough. I don't exaggerate when I use the word extremely. Full of chavs, gnags of thugs. There was literally only 1 other person in my whole year who actually cared about getting good grades. People attended that school not because they cared about getting a good education, but because they were being forced to by the government (parents have to send their children to school, it's the law).

    So, I was surrounded by chavs in the comprehensive school who didn't care at all about studying or getting good grades. I worked hard, got ten A*s in my GCSEs and moved to a grammar school, where I would spend the best 2 years of my life. It was a great experience. This school has a reputation as being one of the very top schools in the entire nation.

    the people at the grammar school aren't what you might expect. They do achieve ridiculously high grades, they take lots and lots of subjects at GCSE and A level, they play musical instruments, they come from relatively affluent backgrounds (middle/middle-upper class). But they're not arrogant in the slightest. They're very modest and down to earth. They're very hard working, they care about receiving a good education because they have their minds on their future. This was clearly a different breed, a completely different species compared to the subhuman specimens in my first school. I fit right in. I loved the atmosphere there. The difference was just so huge, it's hard to put in words.

    All I can say is you should definitely try to move to a grammar school if you can. You will absolutely love it there. And don't be intimidated. In my experience at least, my new classroom peers were really civilised and friendly. People kept to themselves pretty much, they go to class, learn, and that's basically it. The learning environment is amazing, I'm glad I was able to experience it. Such a blissful experience.
    Am I the only one who's terrified of rich snotty kids? I'm black too so I feel as if it would be harder for me to fit in? sounds stupid but yeah lol
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    (Original post by dxnielle)
    Am I the only one who's terrified of rich snotty kids? I'm black too so I feel as if it would be harder for me to fit in? sounds stupid but yeah lol
    They're not rich. I didn't go to a private school, it was a grammar. They certainly didn't give the impression of being rich. They were very modest and down to earth, the complete opposite of snotty. They were utterly civilised and very well mannered. There were only 2 black guys in my whole year group, though. I really didn't think much of it to be honest. Don't believe the rumours you hear, not all schools are the same.
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    They're not rich. I didn't go to a private school, it was a grammar. They certainly didn't give the impression of being rich. They were very modest and down to earth, the complete opposite of snotty. They were utterly civilised and very well mannered. There were only 2 black guys in my whole year group, though. I really didn't think much of it to be honest. Don't believe the rumours you hear, not all schools are the same.
    Loooool ah sounds like im gonna be that token black kid after all
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    (Original post by dxnielle)
    Loooool ah sounds like im gonna be that token black kid after all
    hmm...well...I know it might seem bad, but they weren't treated any differently. Like I said, the school where I went was an extremely civilised environment. People were very mature and well mannered, there was NEVER any kind of bullying or making fun of people. Everyone is very welcoming.
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    (Original post by Stinkum)
    hmm...well...I know it might seem bad, but they weren't treated any differently. Like I said, the school where I went was an extremely civilised environment. People were very mature and well mannered, there was NEVER any kind of bullying or making fun of people. Everyone is very welcoming.
    Still thanks for giving me a rough idea of what it's like, it probably won't matter much anyway because apparently I'm funny so hopefully I can make friends that way lol
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    From MY experience, it was the worst decision ever. I narrowly missed a grammar school education twice (which was upsetting) and when I attended one for sixth form, none of it felt right. Being on top of the class at my old school to becoming alright at a grammar. My head of sixth would constantly go on and on and onnnnn about how I can't do science a levels because I took double science (however my old school didn't do triple and only 20 people were allowed to sit the additional science at a higher paper, rest must be foundation and I was one of those 20 achieving A's in the sciences)

    So I'm now a year behind where I was pulled out (both head of sixth form and another party agreed but head of sixth form made it a massive mess)

    HOWEVER, some people LOVE attending a different school full of different people and finally fill that the fit in and can achieve things there old school couldn't require reaching their full potential.

    Think about it carefully but my case isn't like everyone's. Just put your head down and power through your a levels
 
 
 
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