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    Hello Everyone,

    I just wanted to ask some questions that have popped in my head recently.

    1. Has anyone done a civil engineering degree + an MBA and progressed very far in their career? i.e. Managerial position and above.

    2. Is doing an BEng Hons in civil engineering fine for doing an Msc in subsea engineering ? i.e. are they fairly related?

    3. Would it be required/preferred if I were to do an Msc in subsea engineering instead of an MEng in civil engineering to get into a subsea role in oil and gas companies for the likes of BP, Shell, Subsea7 etc... or is doing an MEng in civil engineering be acceptable for a role in subsea?

    4. How hard is it to get into a graduate programme with the big oil firms for the likes of BP, Shell, ConocoPhillips etc.. Especially for a civil engineer.

    5. In general terms, how is the starting salaries for civil engineers in comparison to other engineering disciplines and is it worth studying civil engineering currently in the UK to work here at the end or should I just change course to mechanical or aerospace instead?

    P.S. completed first year of civil engineering.

    Your contribution is much appreciated.
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    (Original post by hammy123)
    Hello Everyone,

    I just wanted to ask some questions that have popped in my head recently.

    1. Has anyone done a civil engineering degree + an MBA and progressed very far in their career? i.e. Managerial position and above.

    2. Is doing an BEng Hons in civil engineering fine for doing an Msc in subsea engineering ? i.e. are they fairly related?

    3. Would it be required/preferred if I were to do an Msc in subsea engineering instead of an MEng in civil engineering to get into a subsea role in oil and gas companies for the likes of BP, Shell, Subsea7 etc... or is doing an MEng in civil engineering be acceptable for a role in subsea?

    4. How hard is it to get into a graduate programme with the big oil firms for the likes of BP, Shell, ConocoPhillips etc.. Especially for a civil engineer.

    5. In general terms, how is the starting salaries for civil engineers in comparison to other engineering disciplines and is it worth studying civil engineering currently in the UK to work here at the end or should I just change course to mechanical or aerospace instead?

    P.S. completed first year of civil engineering.

    Your contribution is much appreciated.
    If you're looking to go into the oil and gas industry, a civil engineering degree is probably one of the less relevant degrees. From my own research, I've looked at BP and Shell, Civil Engineering isn't even mentioned in their scholarship/internship page, it's mainly mechanical engineering, petroleum etc.
    It seems like the starting salaries for civil engineers are similar to other engineering disciplines, but obviously if you have a graduate position in a leading oil and gas company compared to a smaller firm, the one in the larger company is going to get paid more.

    I know the director of one of the most profitable companies in the world (not even kidding) and he has a degree in either surveying or civil engineering and comes from a pretty bad English university, so yes, it is possible to get into a senior position with a civil engineering degree, but from my guess it would be possible to get into a senior position with almost any relevant degree.
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    Thanks for your replay.


    I have had a look at BP internship page saw that they required civil engineers for subsea systems, wells and project engineering. Although I am considering doing an Msc in subsea engineering at Aberdeen once completing my BEng (hons) in civil engineering. Would you know if having a background civil engineering will be fine for studying Subsea engineering?
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    Decent opportunities for civil engineering graduates in oil & gas, most of which are going to be structural related. This can broadly be broken down into topsides (surface production facilities, i.e. the oil platforms themselves) and subsea (various subsea structures that are utilised in subsea facilities that transport the hydrocarbons from the well to the oil platform).

    Then there's pipelines and risers (vertical pipelines that transport hydrocarbons from the seabed to the oil platform), which is quite similar in many ways to structural. Although for these positions you're also competing with mechanical graduates.

    You can also go into drilling and wells, as many oil companies and drilling/well services companies like Schlumberger and Halliburton accept graduates of any engineering discipline.

    In fact there's probably more opportunities for you with a civil degree than a chemical one, to be honest, although they might not be as obvious. Or maybe civil engineering graduates don't look for them. If you look at the BP graduate site, for example, it clearly states there is a programme for civil engineers, as well as positions in subsea and pipelines.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Decent opportunities for civil engineering graduates in oil & gas, most of which are going to be structural related. This can broadly be broken down into topsides (surface production facilities, i.e. the oil platforms themselves) and subsea (various subsea structures that are utilised in subsea facilities that transport the hydrocarbons from the well to the oil platform).

    Then there's pipelines and risers (vertical pipelines that transport hydrocarbons from the seabed to the oil platform), which is quite similar in many ways to structural. Although for these positions you're also competing with mechanical graduates.

    You can also go into drilling and wells, as many oil companies and drilling/well services companies like Schlumberger and Halliburton accept graduates of any engineering discipline.

    In fact there's probably more opportunities for you with a civil degree than a chemical one, to be honest, although they might not be as obvious. Or maybe civil engineering graduates don't look for them. If you look at the BP graduate site, for example, it clearly states there is a programme for civil engineers, as well as positions in subsea and pipelines.
    Thanks you very much for your detailed response Smack.

    I just wanted to know what your think of a doing a BEng in Civil engineering and then doing a Msc in Subsea engineering. I have read the in the university of Aberdeen's website that the Subsea degree is accredited by the institution of civil engineers but would you think the two courses are too different or simular is various aspects?

    Furthermore would it reduce my employment prospects if I done a BEng + Msc rather than doing a MEng degree (currently enrolled on a MEng civil course but I am interested in subsea and therefore thinking of finishing at BEng and doing the Subsea Msc at Aberdeen)?

    Thanks for your contribution.
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    (Original post by hammy123)
    Thanks you very much for your detailed response Smack.

    I just wanted to know what your think of a doing a BEng in Civil engineering and then doing a Msc in Subsea engineering. I have read the in the university of Aberdeen's website that the Subsea degree is accredited by the institution of civil engineers but would you think the two courses are too different or simular is various aspects?

    Furthermore would it reduce my employment prospects if I done a BEng + Msc rather than doing a MEng degree (currently enrolled on a MEng civil course but I am interested in subsea and therefore thinking of finishing at BEng and doing the Subsea Msc at Aberdeen)?

    Thanks for your contribution.
    If you can be arsed with spending the £3500 or so on tuition fees as opposed to the free MEng degree then the subsea MSc is a better shout I think, if you know it's subsea you want to go into.
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    Spending £3500 isn't a problem for me if at the end of it i get a good paying job (which is more than civil anyway) that is really interesting. Would doing a BEng plus Msc would reduce my employment prospects instead of doing an MEng? I'm guessing its the same but it would be nice for someone like you to clarify it.
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    It'll enhance your prospects in the subsea field.
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    (Original post by hammy123)
    Hello Everyone,

    I just wanted to ask some questions that have popped in my head recently.

    1. Has anyone done a civil engineering degree + an MBA and progressed very far in their career? i.e. Managerial position and above.

    2. Is doing an BEng Hons in civil engineering fine for doing an Msc in subsea engineering ? i.e. are they fairly related?

    3. Would it be required/preferred if I were to do an Msc in subsea engineering instead of an MEng in civil engineering to get into a subsea role in oil and gas companies for the likes of BP, Shell, Subsea7 etc... or is doing an MEng in civil engineering be acceptable for a role in subsea?

    4. How hard is it to get into a graduate programme with the big oil firms for the likes of BP, Shell, ConocoPhillips etc.. Especially for a civil engineer.

    5. In general terms, how is the starting salaries for civil engineers in comparison to other engineering disciplines and is it worth studying civil engineering currently in the UK to work here at the end or should I just change course to mechanical or aerospace instead?

    P.S. completed first year of civil engineering.

    Your contribution is much appreciated.
    Hello hammy,

    This was very strange for me to read because I was in the exact same boat and had the exact same questions as you a few years back.

    I recently graduated with an MEng in Civil Engineering at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.

    It is true the the large operating companies such as BP, ConocoPhillips, Shell etc etc will have limited positions for graduates with Civil Engineering degrees. However, there are still opportunities. One girl in my course actually landed two placements with ConocoPhillips which ultimately led to her gaining a graduate position after graduating.

    I myself have secured a spot in Subsea 7's graduate scheme which I am more than delighted about. So again, opportunities are definitely there.

    In looking for placements or internships during your course I would look more into the companies that are contracted out to do engineering works for the major operators. Companies such as Wood Group PSN, Amec, Petrofac etc all have summer placements for students based in Aberdeen and elsewhere. These would be more Structural Engineering based roles however.

    In terms of graduating with a BEng and then studying an MSc in Subsea Engineering, I considered the same thing. I even emailed companies asking what their preference was. At the end of the day I continued with the MEng and still managed to secure a position that I am sure you will probably be applying for in 3 to 4 years time.

    My advice is, if you want to work for major operators, then do the MSc as this may open more doors for you. However i would opt for the MEng if wanting to secure a position with Subsea 7, Technip, Wood Group etc etc

    At the end of the day MSc and MEng are of the same grade and ultimately both can lead to chartership (which companies push you to gain). So if you have either then you will be in with a great shot!

    In terms of salaries I cannot really say as all the graduates in Subsea 7 earn the same as the roles are generally multi disciplinary. (30k+)

    From what I have been told, Chem engineers and Mech engineers usually earn more after gaining experience, but how much more I do not know. But don't worry. If you gain a position with any of the companies you mentioned then you will be very well paid.

    If you require any other info just drop me a message and i'll help as best as I can!

    All the best in your course!

    Craig
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    Hi Craig,

    Thank you very much for your detailed response. Its great to get some advice from another Strathclyder!
    Also well done is getting a job with Subsea 7. Awesome.

    Just wondering, what role do you have in Subsea 7 just now and do you know if any civil engineers that went into management or sales early in their careers?
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    (Original post by hammy123)
    Hi Craig,

    Thank you very much for your detailed response. Its great to get some advice from another Strathclyder!
    Also well done is getting a job with Subsea 7. Awesome.

    Just wondering, what role do you have in Subsea 7 just now and do you know if any civil engineers that went into management or sales early in their careers?
    Hammy

    Sorry for the late reply, i'm never really on this anymore.

    With Subsea 7 my job title is actually "graduate engineer" which is a title all graduates for subsea 7 take on no matter what course they studied. This is because the grad scheme for subsea 7 consists of four 6 month rotations.

    For example, for my first rotation I could be a structural engineer, the second a project engineer on the rigs, pipeline engineer for the third, geotechnical engineer for the fourth...

    This allows all students to explore different disciplines in the company and find out which you are most interested in. After this you can then specialise in your chosen field.

    I've spoke to graduates who have just finished the scheme and they absolutely loved the rotation aspect.

    In terms of management, there was one graduate who finished with a BEng honours and was a site engineer for balfour beatty but moved onto a project manager position within a smaller company.... So it is possible but I personally would like to gain the knowledge first before moving onto a more senior role. Everyone's different though! Loads of people want to get stuck right in!

    Again, apologies for the late reply!

    All the best

    Craig
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    Hi Craig,
    I find your feedback very informative. I have total 8 years work experience as civil-structural engineer in onshore oil & gas sector. My experience is mainly Design and analysis of structures.
    Since I am interested in Subsea engineering, I am planning to apply for Masters program in university of Aberdeen.
    But I am worried about the job prospect after my masters since I do not possess any experience in subsea.
    Have you come across subsea engineer with similar as mine ?
    Whether my prior work experience will be transferrable ?
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    For subsea it's extremely competitive. You need good contacts and usually more than 10 years of experience.i have a friend who did mechanical engineering as a bachelors and subsea engineering for masters. He got a job using his mechanical engineering bachelors. Nowadays it's hard to become a subsea engineer.


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