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    Linkedin is boring as hell. Some people will argue 'of course it's boring, it's a professional networking tool to aid your career'.

    My gripe is that it kills off the excitement and interesting nature of real life networking. Everyone speaks of it like you can do everything on there and you can't. Linkedin always (for me anyway) is dead. Even when it's alive it's not a place where you want to go and read and learn something. It's always something that you just feel as though you 'have' to check. Plus it's hard as hell for young people to get in on the action as the site (in my experience) has mostly discussions that are dominated by middle aged management folk.

    The impression I get is: Linkedin isn't a great place if you're a young graduate. Not very welcoming.

    Conferences (in real life) are much much more interesting than spending time on Linkedin. I want to learn things, I meet people... real networking is much much much more exciting and interesting. Plus you just can't emulate the socialising you get at networking events (after the event especially when things get less formal). There are many opportunities at my university and in my profession to 'network' that I don't see the point of Linkedin. The jobs board sucks too. Nothing is never posted and everything is always in London.

    I find Twitter more useful for my career than Linkedin.



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    Its useful to host an online CV and keep up with what colleagues are now doing and keeping in touch to arrange to meet.

    Unless you're an entrepreneur networking as a new grad is pretty pointless. Nobody wants to know you.
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    Linkedin made me hate people I know more than Facebook ever did.

    "Working as part of a tight - knit sales team, our main focus was on building consumer relationships by providing a premium, tailored service to the consumer."

    This guy worked part-time in a clothes shop.
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    LinkedIn is full of people up their own arse.
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    I don't particularly like linkedin if you don't actually have a career yet. Eg the post above - the clothes shop guy...what contacts is he actually trying to get by posting that up?

    Linkedin is mostly for business deals and "I'm looking for a contact who does x, oh he looks like someone I can speak to..." etc. It's not for part time employment and graduates just coming out of uni wouldn't find it helpful because firstly there's nothing really to put on their work profile, and secondly, they would have a lot more chance securing a job though something like reed.co.uk.

    So many of my friends try sending me invites to join linkedin and I don't know why - they don't even have a job! I appreciate you may use it to look for jobs, but that type of website gives you a chance to move up in your career and business contacts - not start them. Your profile just looks weak.

    I have a career and been working full time for the last 2 years, and I don't intend to create a linkedin profile until another 3-4 years or so, when I have actually established myself in the workplace and actually have something to say.
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    I'm a young graduate and have the LinkedIn profile since I was an undergraduate. There are interesting articles here and there, and I did score jobs on LinkedIn despite living not in 'the west' and working in a field with not that many people going online whatsoever.
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    As a young graduate, I got headhunted for legal work through LinkedIn. Has definitely been worth having in my case.
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    Well I'm a soon to be graduate and have been directly recruited by a top technology company via LinkedIn

    I think it's an easy way to keep in touch with old managers and colleagues, especially if you need a reference from them in a couple of years' time when they might have moved to a different company. Also on my profile I have references from previous employers and samples of written work, so future employers get a more holistic view of me and whether I would be a fit for the company, than they would get just by looking at my CV.

    You can also directly see where everyone has studied and worked. For example, I saw that an ex college had studied at a university where I'm considering doing my master's, so I messaged him about it. I also used LinkedIn to find people to interview for a uni project once. So all in all I find it pretty useful

    I agree there's no substitute for being pro-active and going out and meeting people though. A face is always more memorable than a profile!
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    I've just finished Y13 and I find it to be an incredibly useful site to maintain contacts in the professional industries.
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    LinkedIn is one way to get noticed by potential employers but it is high maintenance. You need to firstly make sure your profile is 100% complete, looks professional and then you can get involved in forums and groups. It takes time but it can lead to offline meet ups which is where a proper relationship can develop. Try joining your Uni alumni group for starters?

    PS. Another good thing about LinkedIn is you can see the career trajectory of other graduates from your Uni/Course and also people in the industry you want to work for so don't completely rule it out.
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    It isn't supposed to be a fun, fast paced site like Facebook.
    It definitely does serve a purpose and is amazing if you're looking to get headhunted.
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    As a recruiter I can honestly tell you that I cannot live without linkedin anymore... it helps a lot, not only when I'm trying to find professionals for a certain position, but also when I am searching for things to do in the future. I'll be applying to a graduate programme soon and I already talked to people that are currently working in the programme and that has helped me a lot.
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    Is there a good boring?
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    (Original post by stargirl63)
    I don't particularly like linkedin if you don't actually have a career yet. Eg the post above - the clothes shop guy...what contacts is he actually trying to get by posting that up?

    Linkedin is mostly for business deals and "I'm looking for a contact who does x, oh he looks like someone I can speak to..." etc. It's not for part time employment and graduates just coming out of uni wouldn't find it helpful because firstly there's nothing really to put on their work profile, and secondly, they would have a lot more chance securing a job though something like reed.co.uk.

    So many of my friends try sending me invites to join linkedin and I don't know why - they don't even have a job! I appreciate you may use it to look for jobs, but that type of website gives you a chance to move up in your career and business contacts - not start them. Your profile just looks weak.

    I have a career and been working full time for the last 2 years, and I don't intend to create a linkedin profile until another 3-4 years or so, when I have actually established myself in the workplace and actually have something to say.
    Definitely! I've used Reed and I've been headhunted a few times and even got interviews because of it. Reed is way better for me than Linkedin. It's presentation is better too. I find Linkedin just has too much cluttered on the screen at once


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    Have been headhunted several times through Linkedin. No need to muck about with any groups or huge lists of 'connections'.

    I just copied + pasted my Cv into the relevant sections, filled out the experience and education sections and then sat back. Probably average about 1 or 2 recruiter contacts a month.

    As a social network it's pretty useless, but is a great tool for finding employment.
 
 
 
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