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Correct way to turn Watch

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    OK so I passed my test about a year ago now and looking to buy a car. One thing I'm unsure of is how to turn. Normally I would slow down, down shift to gear 2 and while turning I would release half the clutch, apply gas and get off. Is this the correct way to turn?

    A lot of people say that I should be completely off the clutch when turning, but if I do that the car jerks forward a little.
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    Half engaging the clutch is known as 'riding the clutch' and that's not good for your clutch at all. You want your foot to spend as little time as comfortably possible on the clutch.

    If you rev match before downshifting, you won't feel that little 'bump'.





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    (Original post by live_a_life)
    Half engaging the clutch is known as 'riding the clutch' and that's not good for your clutch at all. You want your foot to spend as little time as comfortably possible on the clutch.

    If you rev match before downshifting, you won't feel that little 'bump'.



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    How do I rev match? And is this what you do during day to day driving?
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    Clutch should be fully engaged. You should have the correct speed and gear before making the turn. If you're getting a jolt you're not releasing the clutch smoothly.

    To rev match you touch the throttle inbetween the gear change. The idea is to match the engine to speed to what it would be in that gear. For example the rpm at 30mph in third might be 3000 but in 2nd might be 4000. So if you drop the clutch, rev the engine to 4000, whilst selecting 2nd gear and then release the clutch there should be not jolt or lurching/slowing down whilst you engage the clutch.

    I tend to rev match whilst i'm approaching a roundabout, shifting from 5th to 3rd or 2nd.
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    Clutch should be fully engaged. You should have the correct speed and gear before making the turn. If you're getting a jolt you're not releasing the clutch smoothly.

    To rev match you touch the throttle inbetween the gear change. The idea is to match the engine to speed to what it would be in that gear. For example the rpm at 30mph in third might be 3000 but in 2nd might be 4000. So if you drop the clutch, rev the engine to 4000, whilst selecting 2nd gear and then release the clutch there should be not jolt or lurching/slowing down whilst you engage the clutch.

    I tend to rev match whilst i'm approaching a roundabout, shifting from 5th to 3rd or 2nd.
    What's your routine for shifting down a gear and turning into a minor road, that's what I'm struggling with at the moment.
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    (Original post by SFeet)
    What's your routine for shifting down a gear and turning into a minor road, that's what I'm struggling with at the moment.
    Brake, until the engine speed gets low, drop the clutch put it second, release the clutch and turn. You should be in gear before starting to turn.

    Are you driving a petrol or diesel?
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    Brake, until the engine speed gets low, drop the clutch put it second, release the clutch and turn. You should be in gear before starting to turn.

    Are you driving a petrol or diesel?
    Petrol. I try to release clutch before I turn but every time I do that the car jerks a little. I always slow down to about 10-12 mph as well.
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    (Original post by SFeet)
    Petrol. I try to release clutch before I turn but every time I do that the car jerks a little. I always slow down to about 10-12 mph as well.
    release it slower from the bite. You probably need to work on your clutch control.
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    release it slower from the bite. You probably need to work on your clutch control.
    If I release the clutch slower then it means I'm spending more time on the clutch which apparently is bad. However, if I turn the way I usually turn I spend the most little time on the clutch.

    Is the way I turn a complete NONO? And if I carry on turning like that, how many miles do you think the clutch will last for?
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    (Original post by SFeet)
    If I release the clutch slower then it means I'm spending more time on the clutch which apparently is bad. However, if I turn the way I usually turn I spend the most little time on the clutch.

    Is the way I turn a complete NONO? And if I carry on turning like that, how many miles do you think the clutch will last for?
    You can slip a little when changing down. Shouldn't be more than half a second.

    If you turn in without the clutch engaged you don't have full control of the car.


    Just practice downshifting basically.
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    (Original post by SFeet)
    How do I rev match? And is this what you do during day to day driving?
    Another user has told you how to rev match. Video/tutorials on the internet can help you further however, that user did explain it rather well.

    And yes, this is what I do in day to day driving. It is the most efficient and comfortable way to drive. The 'bump' you experience is based purely on the fact that your road speed is different to your engine speed, Rev matching helps the engine speed catch up to the road speed. Practice this when downshifting while driving in a straight line and then develop the same technique for turning corners.

    It's not the end of the world if you're keeping your clutch halfway up when you start turning, just make sure the clutch is engaged before you complete the maneuver.
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    So much old fashioned advice. Rev matching, don't turn with your foot on the clutch, its all straight out of a 1950s drivers manual.

    Brakes to slow, gears to go.

    Its really very simple: clutch and brake as you approach corner, turn corner, engage appropriate gear, accelerate away.

    You can engage gear before or after corner, it doesn't really matter. Anyone who thinks you're going to lose control of the vehicle at 20mph because you've got your foot on the clutch needs their head checking.
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    ohh yeaaah ride dat clutch all day long YEAH BABY OHH YEEAAHHH RIDE IT
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    The way I like to do turns is, basically, I let off the accelerator and apply the brake if I have to, get my speed down so I can go down into second gear. All of that is on the approach to the turn. Then I just turn the corner in second gear, that's it.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    So much old fashioned advice. Rev matching, don't turn with your foot on the clutch, its all straight out of a 1950s drivers manual.

    Brakes to slow, gears to go.

    Its really very simple: clutch and brake as you approach corner, turn corner, engage appropriate gear, accelerate away.

    You can engage gear before or after corner, it doesn't really matter. Anyone who thinks you're going to lose control of the vehicle at 20mph because you've got your foot on the clutch needs their head checking.
    So you advise he goes around the corner with the clutch disengaged? Just want to clarify that because I can't believe that someone would advise that.


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    (Original post by live_a_life)
    So you advise he goes around the corner with the clutch disengaged? Just want to clarify that because I can't believe that someone would advise that.


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    Just read Roadcraft ​if you're confused about any details.
 
 
 
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