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    Yo don't worry I'm not expecting someone to just choose for me, just any comments on what else I haven't thought about yet. Freakin bravo if you read this. I tried to make it clearer.
    So obviously I find them both very interesting at AS, and so far it looks like I will next year. I also did maths/further maths this year and though I really enjoy maths my grades are just not safe enough to do further next year (im lucky if i got a B) and get higher than a B next yr. is it still worth doing it, considering the amount of maths in phys/chem at uni? Ive done so much better on the supposedly harder papers that it confused me a bit for next year. It does take me a bit longer to understand stuff than the rest of my class so in one way doing f.maths could help for a head start ish but on the other it could hinder my application. Who knows though, and i could resit instead/do AS fmaths. Chu think?
    To the sciences: i assumed from quite early on in the year that it would just be awesome to learn chemistry more in depth and i naturally found it easier to read about and commit study to. mostly physical chemistry, but then i looked into the rest in industry and research. just overall interested. though this simpler stuff about the atom popped up in physics, then energy which i really like, and mechanics but though it was my preference in maths i found quite hard in phys. Electricity got me though, which sucks coz i also find it really interesting when it makes sense aha. In chem its thinking about what the atom and molecules are doing, why, and how on earth do we know/work this out.
    I like technology and areas like advancement in nanotechology and superconductivity and computing, if i was to read about news in phys its less of an impulse as my mind sort of goes ' nah i wont understand that and its probably all down to maths in the end anyway ' though any bits i do understand it really interests me. Maybe because i dont undersrand as much aha. In chem im more ready to try to understand it but i find sometimes ill go ' ah thats nice i wouldn't jump at the chance to try it though'. If i can get over my nerves in a lab i reckon i would be more into the idea of it if that makes sense.Other times i cant believe what im reading. For both subjects.
    I know it will me much easier to decide next yr when i study them but i know thats a little late to decide :l
    FINALLY i know i need to go to visit unis, the closest option to me isnt russel group, doesnt offer chem but is high for engineering. The uni offers grade i have a good chance of getting but id like to go someplace else. Il decide after i choose my course i guess. I havent disregarded this as an option to use and learn more of both phys/chem. the maths again and tbh i wasnt great at the idea generating when i did engineering projects. If anyone has any comments on alternative courses instead of traight chemor phys/optional modules being a good possibility that may be good
    Im going to a week summer school where we stay with a physics student in their research, nothing for chem I've been able to get frustratingly. I havent been able to make it to open days but hopefully in september.
    THANK YOU so much for reading this, im probably less likely to ramble if you wanna ask a question, any help/suggestions/comments or kick up the arse is greatly appreciated.
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    l2paragraph & tl;dr maybe pls ty. where visual appeal?
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    l2paragraph & tl;dr maybe pls ty. where visual appeal?
    What?
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    (Original post by Nat_LPS)
    What?
    He's saying the wall of text is horrendous, so a paragraph spacing or two wouldn't go amiss.

    To the original point: there's also the option of combined degrees - usually called things like 'chemical physics' - the names vary from place to place but there's a handful out there. Could be worth looking at if you don't end up finding a distinction between them.

    With lab work there's more going on in chemistry, i'd imagine. Ultimately, i'm not too sure where you'll end up with physics. The only people I have known to do physics are either in research or switched to a completely different field. Someone else might know more about the options there.

    I'd definitely go and see an open day. Ideally somewhere you might apply to, but if it's simply just whatever is the most local then it's worth it to see what's there. They'll explain the course setup better and you'll see the labs.

    You don't need to continue further maths for chemistry, but it may be a personal advantage and make it a lot easier later on if you choose to do physics. The guy who ended up in another field after his physics BSc said to me he wished he had done further maths at a-level. You've done the AS though, and to be honest i'd keep maths, chemistry, physics as the priority so drop further unless you really decide on physics - then it's worth considering.

    The advantage of chemistry here is that you can specialise towards physical chemistry later on, which probably encapsulates more of your interests. Long as you're happy enough with organic/inorganic work as well then it's viable. It's very broad as an undergraduate course though, so you can end up in any area of the industry. Labs are scary when you first start; it gets easier.
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    (Original post by Nymthae)
    He's saying the wall of text is horrendous, so a paragraph spacing or two wouldn't go amiss.

    To the original point: there's also the option of combined degrees - usually called things like 'chemical physics' - the names vary from place to place but there's a handful out there. Could be worth looking at if you don't end up finding a distinction between them.

    With lab work there's more going on in chemistry, i'd imagine. Ultimately, i'm not too sure where you'll end up with physics. The only people I have known to do physics are either in research or switched to a completely different field. Someone else might know more about the options there.

    I'd definitely go and see an open day. Ideally somewhere you might apply to, but if it's simply just whatever is the most local then it's worth it to see what's there. They'll explain the course setup better and you'll see the labs.

    You don't need to continue further maths for chemistry, but it may be a personal advantage and make it a lot easier later on if you choose to do physics. The guy who ended up in another field after his physics BSc said to me he wished he had done further maths at a-level. You've done the AS though, and to be honest i'd keep maths, chemistry, physics as the priority so drop further unless you really decide on physics - then it's worth considering.

    The advantage of chemistry here is that you can specialise towards physical chemistry later on, which probably encapsulates more of your interests. Long as you're happy enough with organic/inorganic work as well then it's viable. It's very broad as an undergraduate course though, so you can end up in any area of the industry. Labs are scary when you first start; it gets easier.
    Oh right I'm sorry I hate that I kept so much in the post my brain's unfortunately not so clear atm. I admire the spacing in your reply though, thanks.
    Thanks a lot, I suppose doing four subjects next year's risky, is there not much new/more challnging maths in chemistry then? i may have had a slightly wrong idea. thanks for the insight on physics its easy to feel it is just for researchers. Yeah I'll have a better look into what I can do after the first/second year in different unis.
    Thanks again you've helped
 
 
 
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