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    Hi guys,

    This is my very first post here and I'm hoping it will motivate a healthy discussion.

    I'm on my final year of my bachelor's degree in law, but I wish to continue my postgraduate studies in the UK in finance or, at least, a related area. For quite some time now, I've been fascinated by financial markets and securities, and the finance industry in general. However, since I don't have the numerical background or knowledge of finance (as you can imagine, a law degree has no mathematical or statistical content) to apply for an MSc in Finance, I have found a way around it, or better even, two:

    1) Applying for an MSc in Management, with a pathway in Finance, graduating with a Masters in Management with Finance (Bath: Management with pathways).

    2) Applying for an MSc in Finance combined with another subject (Bradford or Leicester: Finance, Accounting and Management).

    After my masters degree, my idea was to come back to my home country and work in auditing/consulting (tax, probably) for a few years, untill I figure out what it is that I truly want out of my career. If needed, I'll even take another postgraduate course in corporate finance, financial risk management or whatever... I'm well aware about the connection between law and finance in areas such as distressed debt/Asset Management, M&A, real estate, etc, but in practice, I think I would very much dislike working for a law firm or the legal department of a company or bank.

    So, what advice can you give me? What courses or universities should I opt for? In which segment of the market or area of finance would my knowledge of law help me the most? Which is the area of finance with the least maths?

    All the best!
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    I thought of yet a third option, which would be to take a Pre-masters/PgDip in Finance (Queen Mary, Birkbeck, Newcastle) before going into an actual Masters... The problem is that this would take 2 years in total instead of 1 and also, I hear these "Graduate Diplomas" aren't really prestigious enough for top companies... Thoughts?
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    You don't need a masters to go into Finance. If anything I would try looking for internships, as you get trained whilst in industry. Is there any specific roles you're looking for? For instance most trading positions would require a numerical background Maths/Engineering/Finance/Economics whereas other roles in IBD have people from various academic backgrounds.

    As long as you show academic capability and interest/commitment to the role, you have a shot. This is in relation to Investment Banking. The recruitment process can be very selective and you would be at a major advantage if you attended one of the following institutions:

    Oxbridge, Imperial and LSE; UCL and Warwick

    After the G5:
    Durham/Edinburgh/Nottingham/Bristol
    Cass Business School (London)
    York/Bath/St Andrews
    King’s/Manchester
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Investment_Banking

    If you do go for a Masters I would strongly recommend trying to get into the top institutions.

    Have you taken a look at Compliance? These roles may suit your academic history.
 
 
 
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