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    Hi, which degree would be better for a pathway into Finance? Economics or Economics and Business Finance?
    I`ve applied for Economics, but Economics and Business Finance seems to have more finance related modules like Corporate Finance and Econometrics for Finance, which the Economics course doesnt. Economics does have Econometric Methods and Applications in the 3rd year, but Economics and Business Finance has modules like Empirical Finance and Financial Theory and Corporate Policy, whereas Economics doesnt, but I thought Economics would be more respected than Business.
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    (Original post by Mav455)
    Hi, which degree would be better for a pathway into Finance? Economics or Economics and Business Finance?
    I`ve applied for Economics, but Economics and Business Finance seems to have more finance related modules like Corporate Finance and Econometrics for Finance, which the Economics course doesnt. Economics does have Econometric Methods and Applications in the 3rd year, but Economics and Business Finance has modules like Empirical Finance and Financial Theory and Corporate Policy, whereas Economics doesnt, but I thought Economics would be more respected than Business.
    I would think that Economics would be better. Some firms seem to prefer a more traditional subject, i.e. a straight honours degree. I know that in my Economics degree, there are some elements of Finance linked into our course and we can even choose Finance as a module in our first year, and in subsequent years thereafter. Does your university offer a similar sort of thing?

    As the Finance side of the degree is relevant, it could be that the Business Finance does you some good though.

    I would say, go for the degree that you think you'd enjoy most, as it means you'll revise it more and, because of that, theoretically do better in exams and therefore your degree classification overall. Remember that a 2:1 is normally required, and a 2:1 in most disciplines is better than a 2:2 in others.
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    I know plenty of people who have studied non-finance subjects and got very good graduate jobs in finance. I would also suggest choosing the course that you are most interested in.
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    Any of the two is alright, to be fair. Although straight Economics seems more respected.
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    My knowledge of the front office is less established than the back office but I still can't fathom the idea of a recruiter poring over a CV and being overly concerned if you studied straight Economics or Economics and Business Finance.

    There is an element of choosing the right degree and front office Finance is a bit more selective about it than most (e.g. Big 4 auditors and back and middle office finance generally don't care what your subject is provided they don't perceive it as ridiculously obscure, like Equine Studies, and even then....) but as long as it's relevant, they respect the institution and you get good grades then you've ticked the box for the interview.

    So, really the decision comes down to two things. First, what interests you most. Pure Economics or Business Finance, do the subjects you like best and also remember not all Finance jobs are the same, in some roles the pure Economics might be more relevant. Perhaps a good approach is to drill down further into what you want to do, look at the professional qualifications you might like to take and then work out which degree helps you meet your end goals more efficiently?
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    Try to find out what optional modules you can take with Economics. I did Economics at Warwick and there were many Business School modules we were able to take including modules relating to finance and accounting. You may actually be able to tailor your options such that you have a fairly similar set up of modules as Economics and Business Finance but you will still be awarded the straight Economics degree - which I agree is probably more attractive to employers (although I have no specific knowledge or evidence to support my view I do personally feel that joint honour degrees may seem less attractive outside of the traditional ones like PPE).
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    Try to find out what optional modules you can take with Economics. I did Economics at Warwick and there were many Business School modules we were able to take including modules relating to finance and accounting. You may actually be able to tailor your options such that you have a fairly similar set up of modules as Economics and Business Finance but you will still be awarded the straight Economics degree - which I agree is probably more attractive to employers (although I have no specific knowledge or evidence to support my view I do personally feel that joint honour degrees may seem less attractive outside of the traditional ones like PPE).
    I'm not really sure I follow the logic that joint honours degrees are less attractive to employers? Why would they be?
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    (Original post by AW1983)
    I'm not really sure I follow the logic that joint honours degrees are less attractive to employers? Why would they be?
    Just a personal view as I said. Nothing to back it up.

    Edit: I guess my view stems from recent years of media playing down 'wishy-washy' subjects such as media studies etc as worthless. Maybe joint honours degrees are not viewed as favourably simply because of their names. Alternatively you may not experience the more difficult content of either subject in a joint honours. I knew a couple people doing joint Politics and Sociology and they basically just did the core modules from each subject and didn't study anything particularly specialist in either. I think they also had the choice of whether to do a dissertation/research project unlike straight subjects students. Additionally I have a friend from another university who studied Physics & Marketing, which seems like a random combination, if he was to apply to jobs in either field surely they would prefer a straight Physics or straight Marketing degree over his choice. Like I said I don't have any quotes or sources from big businesses supporting that view. Its just some thoughts.
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    Just a personal view as I said. Nothing to back it up.

    Edit: I guess my view stems from recent years of media playing down 'wishy-washy' subjects such as media studies etc as worthless. Maybe joint honours degrees are not viewed as favourably simply because of their names. Alternatively you may not experience the more difficult content of either subject in a joint honours. I knew a couple people doing joint Politics and Sociology and they basically just did the core modules from each subject and didn't study anything particularly specialist in either. I think they also had the choice of whether to do a dissertation/research project unlike straight subjects students. Additionally I have a friend from another university who studied Physics & Marketing, which seems like a random combination, if he was to apply to jobs in either field surely they would prefer a straight Physics or straight Marketing degree over his choice. Like I said I don't have any quotes or sources from big businesses supporting that view. Its just some thoughts.
    I think it really depends on your career aspirations and there are some very good combinations out there. Actually, in my view it's a weakness of the British system that students do just one subject; in most developed countries they have a 'liberal arts' model for undergraduate degrees where your major makes up about half the degree and the rest of the degree is made up of minors, resulting in a graduate with broader skills. Doing two sets of core modules is also probably just as hard as becoming specialist in one area. I don't really think employers look at the subjects much unless they stand out as completely irrelevant.

    Anything with 'studies' in the name normally gets a good bashing unless it's in languages although I'm not sure why. There's generally an aversion to Media Studies not, I think, because of the content but because employers think you must be mad to do a course with such a bad rep. It's such a shame because in other countries the same type of degree, often called 'Journalism,' has far more respect and I think doing the subject might have been useful for a few News of the World hacks, especially the modules on law and ethics!

    But combinations are generally respectable. Physics and Marketing graduates would probably do quite well in my firms derivatives sales teams. People who want to study Technology can benefit from a few modules to get into a specific industry, by doing some accounting modules for example. Law is often a handy combination to have too.
 
 
 
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