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How to study Law in US and UK after graduation from IGCSE (secondary school)? Watch

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    (Sorry if this is the wrong section)

    Initially I planned to practice law in the UK as a barrister following this route: A Level (Law) → LLB → Bar.

    But now my family is planning to send me to US (New York) to study law there. I want to know the route I should take to become an attorney.

    IF if matters, I took 7 subjects for my IGCSE. My grades are the following: grade A in 3 subjects, grade B in 2 subjects, grade C in 2 subjects

    Also, is it possible to study UK law in US and move to UK to practice as a barrister? If yes, to what extent can one study UK law before having to move from US to UK?

    Please be nice while answering. Thank you in advance!
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    (Original post by Hei101)
    (Sorry if this is the wrong section)

    Initially I planned to practice law in the UK as a barrister following this route: A Level (Law) → LLB → Bar.

    But now my family is planning to send me to US (New York) to study law there. I want to know the route I should take to become an attorney.

    IF if matters, I took 7 subjects for my IGCSE. My grades are the following: grade A in 3 subjects, grade B in 2 subjects, grade C in 2 subjects

    Also, is it possible to study UK law in US and move to UK to practice as a barrister? If yes, to what extent can one study UK law before having to move from US to UK?

    Please be nice while answering. Thank you in advance!
    First of all, it would not be possible for you to study law as an undergraduate degree, since the JD degree in the US is a postgraduate degree. You will have to choose a subject other than law to study before doing your law degree in the US. Even if you use your A-levels, they will not accept it for law school.

    On top of that, you will need to complete the LSAT in order to be considered for admission for law school in the US.

    In conclusion, I would advise doing your LLB degree in the UK instead.
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    (Original post by zero_Gravity91)
    First of all, it would not be possible for you to study law as an undergraduate degree, since the JD degree in the US is a postgraduate degree. You will have to choose a subject other than law to study before doing your law degree in the US. Even if you use your A-levels, they will not accept it for law school.

    On top of that, you will need to complete the LSAT in order to be considered for admission for law school in the US.

    In conclusion, I would advise doing your LLB degree in the UK instead.
    If I were in the US now what academic route should I follow (within the US) to be an attorney?

    I have just completed my International GCSE, but I fear the UK may be out of my reach :/

    Also, how many years would it take? Would the US academic route take longer than the UK academic route (A Level Law, LLB, Bar Law)
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    (Original post by Hei101)
    If I were in the US now what academic route should I follow (within the US) to be an attorney?

    I have just completed my International GCSE, but I fear the UK may be out of my reach :/

    Also, how many years would it take? Would the US academic route take longer than the UK academic route (A Level Law, LLB, Bar Law)
    Well, in the US, it doesn't matter what you study for your undergraduate degree. As long as you get a decent grade and a LSAT score, you should be able to apply for US law schools. However, if you want to be considered for admission into a top US law school in the first tier, you will need to get at least a CGPA of at least 3.7 (equivalent to first class in the UK) on your undergraduate degree, excellent references from your professors, an outstanding personal statement, as well as an LSAT score of over 170 to be considered competitive in the admissions process.

    In total, it would take at least 7 years to become a lawyer in the US. This does not include the time it would take you to complete the licencing exam and miscellaneous tasks required to apply for law firms. Hence, it is without a doubt that it would take significantly more time to receive a JD degree in the US (even if you got into law school right after you graduate from your undergraduate studies) than in the UK, which would only take 3 years to achieve an LLB degree. Taking into consideration of the exorbitant fees that US universities charge for their international students, I would highly recommend that you pursue your law degree in the UK.
 
 
 
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