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Tips for A2 English Literature Gothic/Critical Theories Watch

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    Anybody got any past experience that could help me for this year
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    (Original post by JayDu)
    Anybody got any past experience that could help me for this year
    AQA B?

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    Yeah B
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    (Original post by JayDu)
    Yeah B
    Which texts are you studying? May be able to give you more specific advice if they're ones that I did

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    Wuthering Heights, The Bloody Chamber, Macbeth and Frankenstein thank you
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    (Original post by JayDu)
    Wuthering Heights, The Bloody Chamber, Macbeth and Frankenstein thank you
    Perfect, I did the first 3

    -Firstly, if you haven't chosen texts for your coursework comparison piece, I'd really recommend chosing texts in the gothic genre. I know that's an obvious statement, but it helps so much when it comes to covering AO3 in the exam. I chose a couple of short stories by Edgar Allan Poe and compared them to a short story by D. H. Lawrence. It helped me so much in the exam as I could find links without having to do a lot of wider reading outside that. It'll also help you develop your knowledge of the gothic genre.

    -Familiarise yourself with the genre as much as you can in other ways. Understanding common features of the genre is obviously vital and learning key gothic terms is also very important (i.e. the supernatural which feature heavily in Macbeth and Wuthering Heights.

    -If you don't already, know the AOs as best as you can. English Lit is actually pretty mechanical in the way that you really need to follow them in order to do well.

    -More obviously, know your texts as best as you can. Of course, this exam is closed book so you'll need to learn a lot of quotes. Try and learn ones that are applicable to a lot of themes as it'll be so much easier for you and save you having hundreds to memorise. Luckily you're studying 4 texts even though you only need 3, so if you really dislike one, don't bother with it much (naughty but perhaps sensible )

    -I don't know about you, but it took me a while to get my head around WH, so even reading plot overviews is very beneficial. Know Heathcliff in a lot of detail as he tends to be a character who you can always focus on, he's perfectly gothic

    -You don't really need to know each story from TBC in a lot of detail, I'd recommend learning about 4 very well and simply knowing the rest in just a bit of detail. It's not advised by the exam board, but it really isn't necessary to know all in great detail when you only need to answer on a minimum of two stories in the exam.

    -Don't forget to do some research on the historical background to the texts in question. For Macbeth think about James I, witches, an easy way to hit the marks in the exam is by saying how the Jacobean audience would react to certain events in the play. For TBC, look into feminism in the 1970s use terms such as 'patriarchal society'

    If you're ever in need of an example for the coursework, I will happily send mine over. I chose metaphor for the critical anthology

    -Definitely use this as a revision material. A member on here created this and it's honestly amazing, he is so so helpful and very talented at the subject!

    http://jakedoesrevision.blogspot.co....se-of.html?m=1

    Enjoy the course, I really loved it and it's very interesting If you have any questions, feel free to ask



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    (Original post by Changing Skies)
    Perfect, I did the fIrst 3

    -Firstly, if you haven't chosen texts for your coursework comparison piece, I'd really recommend chosing texts in the gothic genre. I know that's an obvious statement, but it helps so much when it comes to covering AO3 in the exam. I chose a couple of short stories by Edgar Allan Poe and compared them to a short story by D. H. Lawrence. It helped me so much in the exam as I could find links without having to do a lot of wider reading outside that. It'll also help you develop your knowledge of the gothic genre.

    -Familiarise yourself with the genre as much as you can in other ways. Understanding common features of the genre is obviously vital and learning key gothic terms is also very important (i.e. the supernatural which feature heavily in Macbeth and Wuthering Heights.

    -If you don't already, know the AOs as best as you can. English Lit is actually pretty mechanical in the way that you really need to follow them in order to do well.

    -More obviously, know your texts as best as you can. Of course, this exam is closed book so you'll need to learn a lot of quotes. Try and learn ones that are applicable to a lot of themes as it'll be so much easier for you and save you having hundreds to memorise. Luckily you're studying 4 texts even though you only need 3, so if you really dislike one, don't bother with it much (naughty but perhaps sensible )

    -I don't know about you, but it took me a while to get my head around WH, so even reading plot overviews is very beneficial. Know Heathcliff in a lot of detail as he tends to be a character who you can always focus on, he's perfectly gothic

    -You don't really need to know each story from TBC in a lot of detail, I'd recommend learning about 4 very well and simply knowing the rest in just a bit of detail. It's not advised by the exam board, but it really isn't necessary to know all in great detail when you only need to answer on a minimum of two stories in the exam.

    -Don't forget to do some research on the historical background to the texts in question. For Macbeth think about James I, witches, an easy way to hit the marks in the exam is by saying how the Jacobean audience would react to certain events in the play. For TBC, look into feminism in the 1970s use terms such as 'patriarchal society'

    If you're ever in need of an example for the coursework, I will happily send mine over. I chose metaphor for the critical anthology

    -Definitely use this as a revision material. A member on here created this and it's honestly amazing, he is so so helpful and very talented at the subject!

    http://jakedoesrevision.blogspot.co....se-of.html?m=1

    Enjoy the course, I really loved it and it's very interesting If you have any questions, feel free to ask



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    That has helped a great deal, thank you so much If you could send the coursework i'd really appreciate that a lot!
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    (Original post by JayDu)
    That has helped a great deal, thank you so much If you could send the coursework i'd really appreciate that a lot!
    You're welcome do you mind if I wait until nearer results day? I'm not sure it's safe giving it out when it may not have been moderated; I don't want to get disqualified for them thinking I've plagiarised or something

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    Yeah no worries, I think you've given me a lot to work through up until then anyway. And I certainly don't want you to get disqualified :O
 
 
 
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