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On Retinal Reflective Receptors and the Longitudinal and Transverse Spectral Lines Watch

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    Synopsis: Basically, after some reading on biochemistry and the comple protein splittings which occur as electrochemical signals being sent to the brain, being mostly self-trained in physics, I came across a question after reading this article:

    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1961SvA.....4..603S



    The retina gathers a lot of information by photons hitting off them almost constantly. The most basic laws of quantum mechanics state that if a photon hit's off a mirror, it will take every possible angle eigenstates into consideration from the source retina - not all light leaves the retina and must bounce off them splitting them into spectral lines. After all, as I quote wiki:

    ''
    A spectral line is a dark or bright line in an otherwise uniform and continuous spectrum, resulting from a deficiency or excess of photons in a narrow frequency range, compared with the nearby frequencies.''

    Even though spectral lines are often used in cosmological sizes, a reflection of light would also generate the spectral lines from the retina using the laws of physics as I understand them.Very fine and acute details of quantum activity just outside the retina may have some relationship with the Zeeman effect by noticing a photon can reflect and not always absorb.

    If quantum activity is really working, this should cause what is called the Inverse Zeeman Effect.


    The question of this paper is what effects would that have locally as incoming photon approach?




    Final Conclusions




    When light reflects off the retina, it must cause a splitting of the light.


    The spectral lines will also move away from the retina as a wave with now two beams - both beams spread out over space [1] - which might mean more light is deflected than what the eye absorbs. This could explain how our eye's only pick up a very small range of the Electromagnetic wavelengths. This quantum idea would then extend to biology: I am not a biologist but if this is the correct model, then perhaps nature itself had a rolein how much information the brain takes in. The outgoing information from the retina should interact with incoming photons, which we thought was once rare, but we can now do this.








    [1] - The photon does indeed travel to the eye as a wave, but if absorption occurs then its wave function will collapse and it's worldline defined. If the photon is deflected, then it will leave as a spectral line, just the way we had taken it in... except this one is a split spectral line. The main question one has to ask, how do these photons incoming the retina retain a spectral line from the outgoing split-spectral lines reflected from the retina? I don't know if it would interfere with the linearity of the spectral lines, but this is just a guess for now.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5XYf1GJBhg


    Here Pensrose explains two things that can happen when a photon meets the eye, it can either be absorbed or reflected. When something is reflected in this fashion there is information it appears that our eye's retina somehow refuses to take it in... It may be something akin to correction codes, too much information could muddle up a system, the brain only requiring 37 bits of information according to classical laws, is inconsistent with the percentage required by quantum mechanics.

    The idea that natural selection has created something as complex as the brain is an astonishing feat of the mysteries residing in the study of consciousness.





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5XYf1GJBhg







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    (Original post by Graviphoton)
    Synopsis: Basically, after some reading on biochemistry and the comple protein splittings which occur as electrochemical signals being sent to the brain, being mostly self-trained in physics, I came across a question after reading this article:

    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1961SvA.....4..603S



    The retina gathers a lot of information by photons hitting off them almost constantly. The most basic laws of quantum mechanics state that if a photon hit's off a mirror, it will take every possible angle eigenstates into consideration from the source retina - not all light leaves the retina and must bounce off them splitting them into spectral lines. After all, as I quote wiki:

    ''
    A spectral line is a dark or bright line in an otherwise uniform and continuous spectrum, resulting from a deficiency or excess of photons in a narrow frequency range, compared with the nearby frequencies.''

    Even though spectral lines are often used in cosmological sizes, a reflection of light would also generate the spectral lines from the retina using the laws of physics as I understand them.Very fine and acute details of quantum activity just outside the retina may have some relationship with the Zeeman effect by noticing a photon can reflect and not always absorb.

    If quantum activity is really working, this should cause what is called the Inverse Zeeman Effect.


    The question of this paper is what effects would that have locally as incoming photon approach?




    Final Conclusions




    When light reflects off the retina, it must cause a splitting of the light.


    The spectral lines will also move away from the retina as a wave with now two beams - both beams spread out over space [1] - which might mean more light is deflected than what the eye absorbs. This could explain how our eye's only pick up a very small range of the Electromagnetic wavelengths. This quantum idea would then extend to biology: I am not a biologist but if this is the correct model, then perhaps nature itself had a rolein how much information the brain takes in. The outgoing information from the retina should interact with incoming photons, which we thought was once rare, but we can now do this.








    [1] - The photon does indeed travel to the eye as a wave, but if absorption occurs then its wave function will collapse and it's worldline defined. If the photon is deflected, then it will leave as a spectral line, just the way we had taken it in... except this one is a split spectral line. The main question one has to ask, how do these photons incoming the retina retain a spectral line from the outgoing split-spectral lines reflected from the retina? I don't know if it would interfere with the linearity of the spectral lines, but this is just a guess for now.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5XYf1GJBhg


    Here Pensrose explains two things that can happen when a photon meets the eye, it can either be absorbed or reflected. When something is reflected in this fashion there is information it appears that our eye's retina somehow refuses to take it in... It may be something akin to correction codes, too much information could muddle up a system, the brain only requiring 37 bits of information according to classical laws, is inconsistent with the percentage required by quantum mechanics.

    The idea that natural selection has created something as complex as the brain is an astonishing feat of the mysteries residing in the study of consciousness.





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5XYf1GJBhg





    Interesting read, but I didn't get the motive--did you wish to ask something, or was this simply to elucidate a point?
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    I just wanted to know if it made sense to anyone.
 
 
 
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