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    Hi all,

    I was wondering whetherUK undergraduate degrees are 'accepted' in the US?

    For example, if someone did Economics at LSE, and then applied to Investment Banking Analyst jobs in NYC, would he have the same standing as someone from an Ivy League School? Or if that LSE graduate were to apply to an MBA in a top US business school, would he have the same standing as someone with a US undergraduate degree?


    Thanks!
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    (Original post by londoncricket)

    For example, if someone did Economics at LSE, and then applied to Investment Banking Analyst jobs in NYC, would he have the same standing as someone from an Ivy League School?
    LSE is well regraded in the US. So the issue is more an immigration one really. A firm would have to sponsor you for a working visa, and the process is long and expensive [for the employer]. They would have to prove that only you, and not any American citizen, are qualified to hold that position. The reason why Ivy League schools (+ Duke, Stanford, etc...) have a lot of graduates in banking is that they are heavily recruited on campus before graduation. For an international student at one of those schools, that would mean that the recruiters actually see you a lot during the interview process and get to know you, which makes hiring much more personal (and easier, I'd imagine) than just emailing your CV across.

    This is just speculation, though.

    Or if that LSE graduate were to apply to an MBA in a top US business school, would he have the same standing as someone with a US undergraduate degree?
    I'm not sure about this. But I'm quite sure an LSE degree would put you above many US undergraduate degrees because the quality of US undergraduate degrees varies dramatically from college to college.
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    (Original post by feyy)
    LSE is well regraded in the US. So the issue is more an immigration one really. A firm would have to sponsor you for a working visa, and the process is long and expensive [for the employer]. They would have to prove that only you, and not any American citizen, are qualified to hold that position. The reason why Ivy League schools (+ Duke, Stanford, etc...) have a lot of graduates in banking is that they are heavily recruited on campus before graduation. For an international student at one of those schools, that would mean that the recruiters actually see you a lot during the interview process and get to know you, which makes hiring much more personal (and easier, I'd imagine) than just emailing your CV across.

    This is just speculation, though.



    I'm not sure about this. But I'm quite sure an LSE degree would put you above many US undergraduate degrees because the quality of US undergraduate degrees varies dramatically from college to college.

    Thanks! That is great!

    So, say if I got into LSE and did a degree there, then got an internship in a London office of a multinational investment bank or something, would it still be possible to move to the United States to work and live?
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    (Original post by londoncricket)
    Thanks! That is great!

    So, say if I got into LSE and did a degree there, then got an internship in a London office of a multinational investment bank or something, would it still be possible to move to the United States to work and live?
    Would be almost impossible. Banks in the US have a huge range of top domestic schools to choose from already there would be no reason for them to hire someone internationally into an Analyst class. New York - especially for grad recruitment -- isn't as internationally focused as London, so most of the international hires will have probably graduated from a US school.

    Best way to get to the states is either through intra-company transfer; or working some years in London, go to a top 10 MBA program and enter as an associate.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Would be almost impossible. Banks in the US have a huge range of top domestic schools to choose from already there would be no reason for them to hire someone internationally into an Analyst class. New York - especially for grad recruitment -- isn't as internationally focused as London, so most of the international hires will have probably graduated from a US school.

    Best way to get to the states is either through intra-company transfer; or working some years in London, go to a top 10 MBA program and enter as an associate.

    Ah, okay. Thanks!
 
 
 
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