Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not sure if this is where this post goes, but I have a question.

    Basically I graduated from my local community college with a 3.75 GPA. I am transferring as a junior to a 4 year university to pursue electrical engineering and physics. This university is third tier and not impressive. I was thinking if I were to graduate with both degrees with a 4.0 GPA, intern, do undergraduate research, enroll in clubs (robotics), and get work experience, what are my chances of MIT? If I do real well in university like I just said, I could get into a well known graduate school for a Masters in Physics. After all the work experience between undergrad and post grad and doing a great job on my undergrad and masters degrees, is there a chance I could get into MIT for a ph D in physics? Obviously GRE scores would need to be very good too.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Hi Solarproject. This is a UK-based forum, so I doubt whether anybody will be able to answer your question. Good luck though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Solarproject)
    I'm not sure if this is where this post goes, but I have a question.

    Basically I graduated from my local community college with a 3.75 GPA. I am transferring as a junior to a 4 year university to pursue electrical engineering and physics. This university is third tier and not impressive. I was thinking if I were to graduate with both degrees with a 4.0 GPA, intern, do undergraduate research, enroll in clubs (robotics), and get work experience, what are my chances of MIT? If I do real well in university like I just said, I could get into a well known graduate school for a Masters in Physics. After all the work experience between undergrad and post grad and doing a great job on my undergrad and masters degrees, is there a chance I could get into MIT for a ph D in physics? Obviously GRE scores would need to be very good too.
    You will also have to give the GRE subject tests for physics if you plan on getting into a good school. Every good school looks for a minimum of 75%+ agg in your undergrad and the projects you do. Make sure your projects speak for themselves. Also you will need a strong gre score.

    And MIT, particularly doesnt look only at your university. If you work hard enough, you will get through. Just make sure your work is relevant and innovative.
    Hope this helps.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 22, 2014
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.