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    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
    I write in HTML, CSS, MYSQL and PHP and Laravel (a PHP framework). I'm not sure how long learning HTML And CSS took as it was something I picked up and put down and played with for years, but I learned the core of PHP over a summer by building a site in it. That was a couple of years ago and I've learned a lot more of it by using it in projects. It's constant.

    For me, PHP is the most useful language but you can't really get away without learning HMTL and CSS, even if you are hired specifically as a PHP developer. Using HTML, you build the structure of a website like you build a wall using bricks. CSS is a different language that controls the way the HTML structure looks. One box built with HTML can be changed in colour, shape, and hundreds of other ways using CSS. These languages are great for making purely informational websites that look great.

    PHP meanwhile adds logic to the pretty website made with HTML and CSS. You can take data from users and save it to a database, you can control what is shown based on certain circumstances (eg. Is a user logged in?), you can make the content of a website dynamic based on data you enter. This is the kind of language that forums, social networks and content management systems (eg. Wordpress) are built on. PHP relies on HTML and CSS to display things though, you can't build a website that looks good just using it.

    MYSQL meanwhile is a language that communicates with databases. It marries with PHP to allow you to access databases from a website. Laravel is a PHP framework, which makes using PHP easier and faster by adding features and modifying the syntax.

    The only book I have ever read was MYSQL Cookbook as I find the internet (sites like StackOverflow, PHP docs) much more user friendly and simple to understand.

    I work as a PHP developer at a firm in West Yorkshire, and I was self taught. All this is just my opinion!


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    (Original post by hannah4225)
    I write in HTML, CSS, MYSQL and PHP and Laravel (a PHP framework). I'm not sure how long learning HTML And CSS took as it was something I picked up and put down and played with for years, but I learned the core of PHP over a summer by building a site in it. That was a couple of years ago and I've learned a lot more of it by using it in projects. It's constant.

    For me, PHP is the most useful language but you can't really get away without learning HMTL and CSS, even if you are hired specifically as a PHP developer. Using HTML, you build the structure of a website like you build a wall using bricks. CSS is a different language that controls the way the HTML structure looks. One box built with HTML can be changed in colour, shape, and hundreds of other ways using CSS. These languages are great for making purely informational websites that look great.

    PHP meanwhile adds logic to the pretty website made with HTML and CSS. You can take data from users and save it to a database, you can control what is shown based on certain circumstances (eg. Is a user logged in?), you can make the content of a website dynamic based on data you enter. This is the kind of language that forums, social networks and content management systems (eg. Wordpress) are built on. PHP relies on HTML and CSS to display things though, you can't build a website that looks good just using it.

    MYSQL meanwhile is a language that communicates with databases. It marries with PHP to allow you to access databases from a website. Laravel is a PHP framework, which makes using PHP easier and faster by adding features and modifying the syntax.

    The only book I have ever read was MYSQL Cookbook as I find the internet (sites like StackOverflow, PHP docs) much more user friendly and simple to understand.

    I work as a PHP developer at a firm in West Yorkshire, and I was self taught. All this is just my opinion!


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    Wow great explanation thanks!
    So you didnt even take a course?
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    I know HTML, CSS, JS, PHP, and some MySQL for web development. These languages are really easy, and I wouldn't really even bother with a book. Just follow online tutorials should be enough. You should be able to pick up basics of HTML and CSS in a few hours.

    I am not interested in web development anymore, though, and haven't done any of that stuff in 5 or so years.

    Most of what I do now is embedded development (writing code for non-PC devices), and almost all in C++.

    It's not a very easy language to learn, especially if you want to learn it well. There are many gotchas and strange syntax. It's more or less required though, if you ever want to get into serious game development (beyond phone apps), OS development, or embedded development. Many desktop applications are still in C++, but the trend seems to be moving away to other languages.

    I have been learning it for about 8 years (combination self study, university courses, personal projects, and on the job), and now use it professionally. It's one of those things that you'll never stop learning though. It's a very powerful language that is also very complex. I still discover little quirks of the language every once in a while.

    I don't have any book to recommend in particular, but here are some very good suggestions - http://cboard.cprogramming.com/cplus...endations.html
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    Just wanted to point out that HTML and CSS are not languages.

    I do understand HTML and CSS are required in order to make PHP useful, by they are mere descriptions of what something should look like, and can not solve problems.

    I can primarily do Delphi (Yes, I know, ancient, but brilliant for learning OOP basics). I have nailed Delphi, and find it fairly easy to do Java, C++ etc... Once you learn one language really well, its easy to learn another, so I would focus on learning the principles and experimenting with one language, so that you become a language independent developer. Perhaps to start with C# is rather nice.

    There is plenty of stuff online, and the best way to learn is to practice. You could have the best book in the world, but unless you practice, it'll all be theory. I suggest setting yourself a mini project or task that you wish to achieve and work your way through it, even if you think you do not yet have the skills. This is genuinely the most productive method. Whenever I got stuck, I'd search for snippet of code that'd help me along, and in this manner eventually completed what I needed to.

    I would also suggest that program/app development really either needs to be in the mobile direction or web direction as that is the way people prefer it nowadays (imagine if you had to download a desktop program to shorten links or watch youtube), and you can do some really sleek and clever stuff with JS. The only time desktop applications are written are when you are aiming at selling to companies or businesses with specific needs.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
    In terms of web design, I'm sufficient in HTML, CSS, JS and PHP. I kinda picked them up over time, but my tip is definitely to start small and work on learning each feature separately. CodeAcademy is a good tool for this, amongst others.

    For programming languages, I know Pascal, C#, Java, Lua, and I'm currently learning C. It took me roughly a year to completely learn Pascal through my school, and the knowledge from that I applied to Java and C#. I think Java is the best for learning (it's multiplatform), but it has a few quirks to it. Pascal is very good for learning imperative programming; the best (free) IDE is Lazarus. This book is very good for learning, it even comes with exercises and is in an order which you can follow cover-to-cover.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
    I have a solid understanding of HTML but regularly build my websites and applications using XHTML for validation and correct formatting. I sometimes use html5 for the canvas and webgl. Website are still going strong without semantic html5 tags like nav, footer, article and aside and will do for many years to come.

    I spent quite a few years learning CSS. The thing about CSS is although the selectors and declarations are fairly simple, understanding pseudo elements, positioning, box modelling and floating can take progressively longer and there will always be ways of Improving: faux, fluid, elastic, modular and responsive frameworks are now becoming a more common practice. There are also the new CSS engines like sass and compas and they will have a crucial play in modern web design/development.

    Rachel Andrews, Christ Coyier and Kevin Yank offer fantastic resources for CSS. Rachel Andrews CSS anthology or tricks is one of my most favourite reads and you learn a huge amount on forms, sliding doors, navigation menu designs, website layouts with multiple columns, etc...

    Learning any language thoroughly simply requires practice and more practice until you have the knowledge to build what you need and to overcome challenges you face. You will face many - especially browser compatibility and viewport issues.

    Rachel Andrews - CSS anthology
    Eric Meyer - Smashing CSS
    Responsive Web Design with Html5 and css3 by Ben Frain
    Learning CSS, JavaScript, PHP and SQL by Robin Nixon
    Handcrafted CSS by Dan Cederholm

    you cannot go wrong with those authors and each one is a marvel in the web development/design world.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
    It's my first post, so sorry for anything.
    I'm not a web designer, but I know a bit of CSS, JS.
    I'm java programmer, but I learned C# too. I had contact to HTML, JSP, PHP too.
    When i need make a system, I use some free template and Jquery, a JavaScript library.

    Was needed one year to have a solid base.
    The initial purpose of Java was be free by Sun. Maybe for this is a very used language. Today it belongs to Oracle and yet is free.
    "Java How to Program" (Deitel) is a classic! "Head First Java" is good indication.

    Recently I saw some basic concepts from Java to Android and did simple programs. Mobile devices are everywhere and I think it'll grow further.
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    (Original post by felipe87)
    It's my first post, so sorry for anything.
    I'm not a web designer, but I know a bit of CSS, JS.
    I'm java programmer, but I learned C# too. I had contact to HTML, JSP, PHP too.
    When i need make a system, I use some free template and Jquery, a JavaScript library.

    Was needed one year to have a solid base.
    The initial purpose of Java was be free by Sun. Maybe for this is a very used language. Today it belongs to Oracle and yet is free.
    "Java How to Program" (Deitel) is a classic! "Head First Java" is good indication.

    Recently I saw some basic concepts from Java to Android and did simple programs. Mobile devices are everywhere and I think it'll grow further.
    (Original post by Jamie76)
    I have a solid understanding of HTML but regularly build my websites and applications using XHTML for validation and correct formatting. I sometimes use html5 for the canvas and webgl. Website are still going strong without semantic html5 tags like nav, footer, article and aside and will do for many years to come.

    I spent quite a few years learning CSS. The thing about CSS is although the selectors and declarations are fairly simple, understanding pseudo elements, positioning, box modelling and floating can take progressively longer and there will always be ways of Improving: faux, fluid, elastic, modular and responsive frameworks are now becoming a more common practice. There are also the new CSS engines like sass and compas and they will have a crucial play in modern web design/development.

    Rachel Andrews, Christ Coyier and Kevin Yank offer fantastic resources for CSS. Rachel Andrews CSS anthology or tricks is one of my most favourite reads and you learn a huge amount on forms, sliding doors, navigation menu designs, website layouts with multiple columns, etc...

    Learning any language thoroughly simply requires practice and more practice until you have the knowledge to build what you need and to overcome challenges you face. You will face many - especially browser compatibility and viewport issues.

    Rachel Andrews - CSS anthology
    Eric Meyer - Smashing CSS
    Responsive Web Design with Html5 and css3 by Ben Frain
    Learning CSS, JavaScript, PHP and SQL by Robin Nixon
    Handcrafted CSS by Dan Cederholm

    you cannot go wrong with those authors and each one is a marvel in the web development/design world.
    (Original post by sarcasmrules)
    In terms of web design, I'm sufficient in HTML, CSS, JS and PHP. I kinda picked them up over time, but my tip is definitely to start small and work on learning each feature separately. CodeAcademy is a good tool for this, amongst others.

    For programming languages, I know Pascal, C#, Java, Lua, and I'm currently learning C. It took me roughly a year to completely learn Pascal through my school, and the knowledge from that I applied to Java and C#. I think Java is the best for learning (it's multiplatform), but it has a few quirks to it. Pascal is very good for learning imperative programming; the best (free) IDE is Lazarus. This book is very good for learning, it even comes with exercises and is in an order which you can follow cover-to-cover.
    (Original post by Harjot)
    Just wanted to point out that HTML and CSS are not languages.

    I do understand HTML and CSS are required in order to make PHP useful, by they are mere descriptions of what something should look like, and can not solve problems.

    I can primarily do Delphi (Yes, I know, ancient, but brilliant for learning OOP basics). I have nailed Delphi, and find it fairly easy to do Java, C++ etc... Once you learn one language really well, its easy to learn another, so I would focus on learning the principles and experimenting with one language, so that you become a language independent developer. Perhaps to start with C# is rather nice.

    There is plenty of stuff online, and the best way to learn is to practice. You could have the best book in the world, but unless you practice, it'll all be theory. I suggest setting yourself a mini project or task that you wish to achieve and work your way through it, even if you think you do not yet have the skills. This is genuinely the most productive method. Whenever I got stuck, I'd search for snippet of code that'd help me along, and in this manner eventually completed what I needed to.

    I would also suggest that program/app development really either needs to be in the mobile direction or web direction as that is the way people prefer it nowadays (imagine if you had to download a desktop program to shorten links or watch youtube), and you can do some really sleek and clever stuff with JS. The only time desktop applications are written are when you are aiming at selling to companies or businesses with specific needs.
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    I know HTML, CSS, JS, PHP, and some MySQL for web development. These languages are really easy, and I wouldn't really even bother with a book. Just follow online tutorials should be enough. You should be able to pick up basics of HTML and CSS in a few hours.

    I am not interested in web development anymore, though, and haven't done any of that stuff in 5 or so years.

    Most of what I do now is embedded development (writing code for non-PC devices), and almost all in C++.

    It's not a very easy language to learn, especially if you want to learn it well. There are many gotchas and strange syntax. It's more or less required though, if you ever want to get into serious game development (beyond phone apps), OS development, or embedded development. Many desktop applications are still in C++, but the trend seems to be moving away to other languages.

    I have been learning it for about 8 years (combination self study, university courses, personal projects, and on the job), and now use it professionally. It's one of those things that you'll never stop learning though. It's a very powerful language that is also very complex. I still discover little quirks of the language every once in a while.

    I don't have any book to recommend in particular, but here are some very good suggestions - http://cboard.cprogramming.com/cplus...endations.html
    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    Wow great explanation thanks!
    So you didnt even take a course?
    Wow thanks guys for all your replies, if there are any more people with information please add more.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?

    What programming languages do you know?
    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    Can you recommend any books?

    Much appreciated thanks!
    HTML and all those surrounding it, so CSS, PHP, Javascript, etc. Also know bits of Python.
    HTML is the bulk of most websites, CSS is the layout, PHP is for database-linked forms, Javascript makes it more interactive.
    All very useful.
    You never stop learning.
    I borrowed my dad's books from OU tbh, but codecademy.com and khanacademy.com are good sites for the bulk of a language.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    Wow thanks guys for all your replies, if there are any more people with information please add more.
    Hey Zenarthra,

    What's your intention? Do you want learning a programming language?
    Do you already picked?
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    (Original post by felipe87)
    Hey Zenarthra,

    What's your intention? Do you want learning a programming language?
    Do you already picked?
    Hi Felipe, my intentions are to make games and apps just for fun.
    So i just wanted to know some more information.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    Hi Felipe, my intentions are to make games and apps just for fun.
    So i just wanted to know some more information.
    Oh cool!! I made a game of logic and reasoning in Java Desktop during graduation.
    It was a "Point and Click" game, very simple.
    There are some prejudices about java performance. In fact, java isn't the fastest, but it can be good depending on your necessities.

    In this case, I keep my position: Mobile devices are everywhere and I think it'll grow further. App games are very successful.
    Anyway, sprites, tiles, tileset and tilemap are common concepts in game development. If don't know, worth seeing.
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    (Original post by felipe87)
    Oh cool!! I made a game of logic and reasoning in Java Desktop during graduation.
    It was a "Point and Click" game, very simple.
    There are some prejudices about java performance. In fact, java isn't the fastest, but it can be good depending on your necessities.

    In this case, I keep my position: Mobile devices are everywhere and I think it'll grow further. App games are very successful.
    Anyway, sprites, tiles, tileset and tilemap are common concepts in game development. If don't know, worth seeing.
    Wow nice game, what codes are used for developing iphone apps?
    Or just apps in general?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    Wow nice game, what codes are used for developing iphone apps?
    Or just apps in general?

    Thanks!
    Not sure about apps but I've heard XML mentioned in relation to apps

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    To Program to iphone has some implications (e.g., have a mac, be a registered developer).
    Apple apps use Objc. It's based in C and Object Orientation.
    Android apps use Java. For interface, are used XML.
    But I don't have any experience in mobile games, maybe it can be different.

    Obs.: I live in Brazil and I'm improving my english, so, if I commit an error, please correct me.
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    What web designing languages do you know?
    HTML/PHP/Javascript are the primary languages I know for the web, though I don't use them particularly often.

    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    I started when I was 12, no idea how long it took me to get a proper grasp on them.

    How useful are they and what are they useful for?
    They have been very useful for university assignments in the past, and have gotten me passes when the rest of the group fails.

    Can you recommend which books to purchase in order to learn these languages thoroughly?
    None that I know of.

    What programming languages do you know?
    I am very knowledgeable in C and C++, I know Java very well and I also know C# and x86 assembly to a lesser extent.

    How long did it take you to learn each of them?
    About 2 years each, but I have been learning (yes, still learning!) C and C++ for around 5 years. Java for slightly longer than that.

    How useful are each of them and what particular job do they occupy?
    I find C and C++ incredibly useful as they are the languages I use at work. I have found Java useful for university, and it is also a good language to learn if you're looking to write mobile apps. C# is a very good language for general desktop apps. x86 assembly is only really for hobby projects.

    Can you recommend any books?
    Again, not really, as I've never actually used one. All from the Internet.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    HTML/PHP/Javascript are the primary languages I know for the web, though I don't use them particularly often.



    I started when I was 12, no idea how long it took me to get a proper grasp on them.



    They have been very useful for university assignments in the past, and have gotten me passes when the rest of the group fails.



    None that I know of.



    I am very knowledgeable in C and C++, I know Java very well and I also know C# and x86 assembly to a lesser extent.



    About 2 years each, but I have been learning (yes, still learning!) C and C++ for around 5 years. Java for slightly longer than that.



    I find C and C++ incredibly useful as they are the languages I use at work. I have found Java useful for university, and it is also a good language to learn if you're looking to write mobile apps. C# is a very good language for general desktop apps. x86 assembly is only really for hobby projects.



    Again, not really, as I've never actually used one. All from the Internet.
    YOu made any apps yet ?
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    (Original post by Zenarthra)
    YOu made any apps yet ?
    No mobile apps I don't think. I'm more of a low-level developer.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    No mobile apps I don't think. I'm more of a low-level developer.
    Oh looking smart btw.
    I just wanted to know, what does it take to make things like mobile apps, is it really difficult?
    Im guessing you wouldn't be able to manage on your own?

    Thanks!
 
 
 
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