Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello

    I am currently in year 12 and I am studying Maths, Physics, Further Maths and Economics. My GCSE results were 9 A*'s, 3 A's. As a rough guess I think I got AAAB at A-level with the B probably in further maths (I messed up my d1 exam).

    I am trying to decide what will be the best course for me at university, I'd say my strengths are being logical and analytical. I enjoyed all my a-levels.

    I'm split between maths or economics, but really cant decide whats best for me. I'm hesitant of picking economics because of the large amount of reading and essay writing which I don't particularly enjoy and hesitant about mathematics as I find some of the proofs and pure mathematics looks very hard and tedious. I enjoy application of maths a lot more.

    Any advice would be really, really appreciated!
    (especially from current/former economics and maths graduates or students facing the same dilemma as I)

    p.s. thinking of applying to oxbridge, warwick, lse, ucl etc.

    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Some unis so offer Economics with maths. Why not check at those unis and see if they offer something like that? Economics does include mathematics itself in the course, but maths is just maths, no economic content at all. Its up to you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there
    I'm looking to do Economics next year and by the sounds of it, you'll be applying to the top universities come next Autumn with GCSE's like those!
    Certain economics degrees have a shed-load of maths e.g London School of Economics : So if you're worried about too much essay writing/reading, check different university syllabuses and the topics they have to offer!

    It also depends on what you'd like to do in the future. For anything financial related, Maths and Economics are two of the best degrees out there, but I think Economics may just edge it
    If in doubt, there are a lots of good joint degrees which include Maths and Economics
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks , I've been looking into combined degrees - definitely something I'll consider.

    I just really don't want to be at university studying maths/economics and wishing I had picked the other. Out of interest what universities did you apply/got an offer from for economics?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    A B in further maths is not going to look good to Oxbridge and LSE, especially not for their actual maths courses.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pectorac)
    A B in further maths is not going to look good to Oxbridge and LSE, especially not for their actual maths courses.
    I know, I was really dissapointed after my D1 exam, I feel I had a really bad day and I feel it may have pulled my grade down to a B. Is there anything I can do to prove to universities that despite this I still have a good grasp of maths- i.e. take the MAT/STEP exam even if I'm applying for economics ?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pokims1996)
    Hi there
    I'm looking to do Economics next year and by the sounds of it, you'll be applying to the top universities come next Autumn with GCSE's like those!
    Certain economics degrees have a shed-load of maths e.g London School of Economics : So if you're worried about too much essay writing/reading, check different university syllabuses and the topics they have to offer!

    It also depends on what you'd like to do in the future. For anything financial related, Maths and Economics are two of the best degrees out there, but I think Economics may just edge it
    If in doubt, there are a lots of good joint degrees which include Maths and Economics
    Thanks , I've been looking into combined degrees - definitely something I'll consider.

    I just really don't want to be at university studying maths/economics and wishing I had picked the other. Out of interest what universities did you apply/got an offer from for economics?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mav455)
    Some unis so offer Economics with maths. Why not check at those unis and see if they offer something like that? Economics does include mathematics itself in the course, but maths is just maths, no economic content at all. Its up to you
    Thanks, out of interest what and where do you study?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kylesmiles)
    Hello

    I am currently in year 12 and I am studying Maths, Physics, Further Maths and Economics. My GCSE results were 9 A*'s, 3 A's. As a rough guess I think I got AAAB at A-level with the B probably in further maths (I messed up my d1 exam).

    I am trying to decide what will be the best course for me at university, I'd say my strengths are being logical and analytical. I enjoyed all my a-levels.

    I'm split between maths or economics, but really cant decide whats best for me. I'm hesitant of picking economics because of the large amount of reading and essay writing which I don't particularly enjoy and hesitant about mathematics as I find some of the proofs and pure mathematics looks very hard and tedious. I enjoy application of maths a lot more.

    Any advice would be really, really appreciated!
    (especially from current/former economics and maths graduates or students facing the same dilemma as I)

    p.s. thinking of applying to oxbridge, warwick, lse, ucl etc.

    Specifically for Cambridge, the Economics course is maths-heavy to begin with, and can be made substantially more so by picking the right modules. After first year you can minimise the number of essays you write and end up basically doing an applied maths course.

    If you are not happy with proofs, I would not recommend doing a straight maths course at the unis you mentioned.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kylesmiles)
    Thanks , I've been looking into combined degrees - definitely something I'll consider.

    I just really don't want to be at university studying maths/economics and wishing I had picked the other. Out of interest what universities did you apply/got an offer from for economics?
    I applied for Oxford, LSE, UCL, Bath and Surrey, got an A*AA offer from Bath and AAB from Surrey
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Of course I cannot speak for every uni, but I am currently doing Maths at uni (just finished my first year)

    I will warn you that maths at uni is a lot different to maths at A Level, a lot more proof heavy and theoretical. You have to be a lot more creative than with A Level to understand and form proofs. And you also have to use words a lot more, and learn definitions. Ofc I cannot speak for every uni though, but that is what I hear happens at most.

    I'd really investigate carefully if you want to go into straight maths, as many students are caught out by the changes.

    Not to put you off at all, maths is a challenging but very rewarding degree choice and if you are in the right mindset it is definitely worth it. And can even be enjoyable aha
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kylesmiles)
    Thanks, out of interest what and where do you study?
    I studied Econ at Westminister
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Genesis2703)
    Of course I cannot speak for every uni, but I am currently doing Maths at uni (just finished my first year)

    I will warn you that maths at uni is a lot different to maths at A Level, a lot more proof heavy and theoretical. You have to be a lot more creative than with A Level to understand and form proofs. And you also have to use words a lot more, and learn definitions. Ofc I cannot speak for every uni though, but that is what I hear happens at most.

    I'd really investigate carefully if you want to go into straight maths, and many students are caught out by the changes.

    Not to put you off at all, maths is a challenging but very rewarding degree choice and if you are in the right mindset it is definitely worth it. And can even be enjoyable aha
    Thanks, some great advice there! . Is the theoretical and proof side of maths something which people hated plain and simple or is something which I could grow to love during uni?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kylesmiles)
    Thanks, some great advice there! . Is the theoretical and proof side of maths something which people hated plain and simple or is something which I could grow to love during uni?
    There is not a simple yes/no for this sadly as it really depends on the person. Also depends on the individual units you take, which would vary in specifics from uni to uni.

    I am at Bath, and the most proof based unit is Analysis (don't worry you aren't expected to know the ins and outs of units before you arrive at a uni!!) and yeah, at some points you have to learn proofs that are a whole A4 sheet on paper (only 1 side aha, unless there are pictures also). This can seem like a daunting task to learn and it takes effort and good planning to learn such long proofs. Before exam time everyone moans about it for obvious reasons, even I do (especially when they don't come up!!!). But during term time you see some people going "I genuinely enjoy this unit". So it is very mixed, people just hate exams.

    So yeah, for me personally I enjoy most of the maths I do. I just find it a bit tedious to memorise a bit at times. I can't really say if you can "grow" to enjoy it as such. But you can definitely develop skills to make such things more manageable, which may then give you time to appreciate and enjoy more.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I would go do down the combined route first that way you have both areas covered and also it would open you up to more possibilities.


    Nightworld1066
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.