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My doctor doesn't take my mental health seriously. Watch

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    I haven't created a thread in ages, and quite frankly this is going to be a rant.

    I'm just going to write and hope that this makes sense.

    I believe I've suffered from the Depression for around 2 years. I went to my doctor and they eventually prescribed me some anti-depressants, because It sounded like I had Depression (different doc). I tried different kinds and I've been on anti-depressants for nearly a year.

    In addition to that, I was referred to Therapy etc, and have been receiving CBT for a while now, and before that I went to counselling for a year.

    So, I go back to my doctor (new doctor) and I ask him, "What am I being treated for?" Because quite frankly I think I suffer from Depression. He says I'm being treated for "low mood," he says that I'm not being treated for depression because to be diagnosed with depression you have to be suffering from those symptoms for 6 months. (It had been more than 6 months by that time)

    Now, I'm not a doctor, but when he said that I felt like he was undermining everything I was feeling and essentially saying that there was nothing wrong with me.

    Now, maybe I'm overthinking things here, but literally- everytime I see him I feel like he thinks I'm an attention seeker and gives me antidepressants to make me go away. (I'm not, and I feel like he wants me to somehow prove that I'm really depressed)

    And he is avoiding diagnosing me.

    You may ask why am I so bothered about my GP not diagnosing me?
    I genuinely feel terrible most, if not everyday- and when I'm asked what wrong- I can't say anything, because If I say I have low mood, i'll be told to suck it up and get over it, but I can't.

    tl;dr - My doctor trivialises everything, and won't diagnose me with depression

    Maybe I'm being too sensitive, but I'm annoyed.

    Any shared experiences?
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    Maybe get a new doctor? You don't need to be depressed for 6 months to get help.
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    I think a lot of doctors don't take mental health seriously because they don't understand it and the resources of places to refer you to are so scant.
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    change docs. it is also interesting that you've received counselling for 1+ years, CBT and medication and you believe you still are unwell?
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    I've been there, OP. :console:

    Unfortunately, mental health issues do appear to be quite misunderstood and, by comparison to obvious, physical health problems, are not so easily diagnosed. I would just advise you to not get too 'hung up' on a diagnosis because, ultimately, treatment matters more than labelling the issues you're having.

    You are in the position to take charge of your own treatment and if you feel you need more immediate resolutions, you could ask your GP outright why s/he is refusing to make a diagnosis or ask for a referral to a psychiatrist or local psychological services.
    • #3
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    Something similar happened to me but I was diagnosed, I was on antidepressants for just under a year but they weren't helping so I went back to the doctors and saw someone different. They basically said that it's not a miracle pill and doesn't make you feel better and that no pill will make me feel happy, they didn't offer me an alternative and told me to continue. Instead I told them I was going to stop taking them they didn't seem bothered and said it's my choice. See a new doctor, someone who maybe understands mental health problems a bit better.
    I hope you get the help and support you need to get better because it is really hard to get through. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    change docs. it is also interesting that you've received counselling for 1+ years, CBT and medication and you believe you still are unwell?
    Because I am. Just because you receive treatment doesn't mean you'll be better.
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    Maybe get a new doctor? You don't need to be depressed for 6 months to get help.
    I think that's my only option. Literally, it's terrible though I had to fill out a health check form for uni (im about to start) he told me to put down "low mood" in the mental health section. And I was like - will they even recognise that as anything
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    (Original post by Freudian Slip)
    I've been there, OP. :console:

    Unfortunately, mental health issues do appear to be quite misunderstood and, by comparison to obvious, physical health problems, are not so easily diagnosed. I would just advise you to not get too 'hung up' on a diagnosis because, ultimately, treatment matters more than labelling the issues you're having.

    You are in the position to take charge of your own treatment and if you feel you need more immediate resolutions, you could ask your GP outright why s/he is refusing to make a diagnosis or ask for a referral to a psychiatrist or local psychological services.

    Thanks, I did ask why he refuses the diagnosis and he said it requires 6 months, then I asked why am I on antidepressants and he said we use antidepressants to treat lots of things.
    I'm going to change GP's before uni.
    there's a nice lady one who I went to before, but then this new guy came in and i was added to his lists.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks, I did ask why he refuses the diagnosis and he said it requires 6 months, then I asked why am I on antidepressants and he said we use antidepressants to treat lots of things.
    I'm going to change GP's before uni.
    there's a nice lady one who I went to before, but then this new guy came in and i was added to his lists.
    My belief is that symptoms have to have been consistently displayed for two weeks, not six months, so that's ludicrous! As is just doling out medication with the excuse it 'treats lots of things', since that is hardly transparent. Yeah, OP, I think you'd be better set changing your GP!
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    You've had referrals and various forms of treatment. Ultimately, you're arguing over how he codes your health in his notes. Does it really matter? It changes nothing.

    If the university has an issue with what you've written under the health declaration, they can take it up with your GP.
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    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    You've had referrals and various forms of treatment. Ultimately, you're arguing over how he codes your health in his notes. Does it really matter? It changes nothing.

    If the university has an issue with what you've written under the health declaration, they can take it up with your GP.
    It's not his notes, it's my medical history and low mood is not the same as depression. It says it on the NHS website thing.
    It's the equivalent as calling a broken arm a sprain, but treating you for a broken arm.
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    Your Dr wouldn't have treated you in the first place (with antidepressants and CBT) if he thought that you did not have depression.

    There are many less invasive treatment options eg. counselling, group therapy and family therapy which most Dr's try prior to medications and CBT.

    Re. diagnostic criteria for depression.......there are 3 major criteria: 'low mood, anhedonia (lack of enjoyment in activities one used to enjoy) and lack of energy/increased fatiguability'.

    If you fulfill 2 out of these 3 criteria for greater than 2 weeks, you are classified as depressed
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    It's not his notes, it's my medical history
    Same thing.

    It's the equivalent as calling a broken arm a sprain, but treating you for a broken arm.
    You've had counselling, CBT and anti-depressants. How would this change if he wrote 'depression' in his notes instead of 'low mood'?
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    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    Same thing.



    You've had counselling, CBT and anti-depressants. How would this change if he wrote 'depression' in his notes instead of 'low mood'?

    It wouldn't change a thing, but it certainly would make me feel like what I was saying wasn't trivialised. Additionally, i wont get the support I need with a "low mood" label when i go to uni. It's not the same thing.

    He's not diagnosing me with what I have and that is not right.
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    I'm certain some of the replies I'm getting is because it's a mental health issue. If this was a physical disease, no way would people say that it won't make a difference if Ihave a diagnosis or not.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    It wouldn't change a thing, but it certainly would make me feel like what I was saying wasn't trivialised. Additionally, i wont get the support I need with a "low mood" label when i go to uni. It's not the same thing.

    He's not diagnosing me with what I have and that is not right.
    As I said, if the university wants to question it, they need to take it up with your GP who in turn will write a letter of support.

    You're getting upset over an arbitrary label in a set of private medical documents.
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    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    As I said, if the university wants to question it, they need to take it up with your GP who in turn will write a letter of support.

    You're getting upset over an arbitrary label in a set of private medical documents.
    There's a criteria I have to fit to be diagnosed. I fit it. It's not being upset over nothing and like I said before this kind of reply wouldn't be present if this was a physical condition.
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    Update:

    I tried to change GP,I couldn't everyone else was full/over subscribed.

    So, I've booked for a telephone appt. I am going to explain how I feel and see where it goes. Will share the results.

    and FYI: The counselling was not linked to my gp, it was through school
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Update:

    I tried to change GP,I couldn't everyone else was full/over subscribed.

    So, I've booked for a telephone appt. I am going to explain how I feel and see where it goes. Will share the results.

    and FYI: The counselling was not linked to my gp, it was through school
    You're entitled under NHS rules to make an appointment with a doctor other than your named GP. Obviously it depends on them having slots available, but even if it means maybe waiting a couple of days longer, it might be worth a shot.
 
 
 
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