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very confused about A-levels Watch

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    hello!

    I am very confused about A-levels!

    there are many awarding bodies? which ones? and each of them has different specific information that we need to learn? where is the official list for each? and there are many modules and exams that you need to take to get one A-level? which ones?

    can someone take some time to explain me please thoroughly?

    thanks!
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    (Original post by studos)
    hello!

    I am very confused about A-levels!

    there are many awarding bodies? which ones? and each of them has different specific information that we need to learn? where is the official list for each? and there are many modules and exams that you need to take to get one A-level? which ones?

    can someone take some time to explain me please thoroughly?

    thanks!
    You're questions are very general and perhaps need re-phrasing... Do you go to a sixth form or college? If so then they will use a particular exam board for each subject that they offer, this will then dictate the topics and number of units that you will be expected to study. The level of knowledge that a subject requires across all exam boards is standardised by Ofqual which is an independent organisation which gaurantees the quality of any given A-Level and subject - in this vein a lot of the course content offered by the various awarding bodies will overlap. Typically A-Levels consist of 4 units but this varies per course or syllabus, as a result it's very difficult to give you any specific answers I'm sorry I can't help you more.
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    no, I don't go to a sixth form or college, I will study and participate on my own to the A-level exams, isn't it possible?
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    Self teaching for a-levels isn't really the best idea. You'd need to take the exam in a official center. So i'd contact a local college and ask about it.
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    (Original post by studos)
    no, I don't go to a sixth form or college, I will study and participate on my own to the A-level exams, isn't it possible?
    Im self teaching A-levels at the moment. Give me a shout if you need any help

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    (Original post by studos)
    no, I don't go to a sixth form or college, I will study and participate on my own to the A-level exams, isn't it possible?
    I wonder if it is really worth self-teaching your A-Levels if you're not entirely sure about how they operate and what will be required of you during exams etc. Is it not possible for you to join a sixth form or college?
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    no I cannot join a sixth form or a college (what is really the difference of a sixth form and a college? aren't both schools/colleges?)
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    (Original post by studos)
    no I cannot join a sixth form or a college (what is really the difference of a sixth form and a college? aren't both schools/colleges?)
    A sixth form is tied to a secondary school, and a sixth form college (or just "college"), stands alone, and only offers 16-19 qualifications.
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    so there isn't an official A-level guide to learn about the systems and requirements etc? It is unfair for people who self study!
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    (Original post by studos)
    so there isn't an official A-level guide to learn about the systems and requirements etc? It is unfair for people who self study!
    There is a syllabus, but it will vary, depending on which exam board you take your exams with.
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    (Original post by studos)
    so there isn't an official A-level guide to learn about the systems and requirements etc? It is unfair for people who self study!
    A-levels were not designed to be self-taught. You are going to struggle if you are trying to follow that route. In terms of choosing examination boards you need advice from different experts on each subject you are planning to choose.
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    (Original post by studos)
    so there isn't an official A-level guide to learn about the systems and requirements etc? It is unfair for people who self study!
    It's assumed that people pick it up through thorough research online. I knew about how A-Levels worked before teachers at school explained it to me because I'd taken the time to research it properly.
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    It's assumed that people pick it up through thorough research online. I knew about how A-Levels worked before teachers at school explained it to me because I'd taken the time to research it properly.
    you are talking as if we have to do with a natural phenomenon, rare and hard to explain, where scientists try to investigate...

    it's an exam! each exam has a material to learn! it's simple!
    it's the first time I see you have to research about an exam to take!
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    (Original post by studos)
    so there isn't an official A-level guide to learn about the systems and requirements etc? It is unfair for people who self study!
    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...levelGuide.pdf

    every exam board has information on their website to help private candidates
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    is there a comparison of the different exam boards for Maths, Physics and Chemistry?
    what kind of differences exist, apart from the knowledge to be learned? are there differences in the format of exams, in the time, etc?
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    Not to my knowledge.

    All maths are very similar.
    Don't do the OCR MEI syllabus as it includes coursework in the C3 module that is a problem for private candidates. Edexcel syllabus is taken by more students than all the other alternatives combined.

    Science A levels include practical exams. This will be your biggest challenge and cost to arrange. Find an exam centre that will accept you for practicals and follow whichever syllabus they offer.


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    (Original post by studos)
    you are talking as if we have to do with a natural phenomenon, rare and hard to explain, where scientists try to investigate...

    it's an exam! each exam has a material to learn! it's simple!
    it's the first time I see you have to research about an exam to take!
    No. You know nothing about A-Levels. Literally nothing. Search it up instead of asking vague questions on here. Honestly, it's shocking that you know so little about the system, considering that you will be doing them this year. You don't even know your exam boards.
    So instead of being patronising, get researching.
    A-Levels aren't meant to be self-taught. You'd do much better at sixth form/college, especially as English doesn't seem to be your first language.
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    (Original post by studos)
    you are talking as if we have to do with a natural phenomenon, rare and hard to explain, where scientists try to investigate...

    it's an exam! each exam has a material to learn! it's simple!
    it's the first time I see you have to research about an exam to take!
    What sort of exams have you taken? If you are planning to enter as a private candidate and choose different courses from different examination boards then you need to research those. If you enrol in a sixth form college then the course department would have already chosen a specific examination board and they should provide information in terms of the assessment involved and topics to be covered.
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    (Original post by studos)
    hello!

    I am very confused about A-levels!

    there are many awarding bodies? which ones? and each of them has different specific information that we need to learn? where is the official list for each? and there are many modules and exams that you need to take to get one A-level? which ones?

    can someone take some time to explain me please thoroughly?

    thanks!
    I agree that learning them at a sixth form or college is most likely better than self-teaching, but I'll answer your questions anyway.

    Awarding Bodies: Assuming you live in England, the most common awarding bodies are AQA, Edexcel and OCR. You then have CIE which is international, WJEC which is Welsh, and a couple of others dotted around. They usually offer the same subjects, but the syllabi and exams are different, so you need to do your research to find out which works for you the best.

    Official Lists: Every A level on every board has a 'specification' that you can find on the exam board's website. That details everything you have to know and to do.

    Modules: Each A level consists of several modules, usually between 4 and 6. You take half of them in the first year (usually) and then receive an AS level. You then take the second half, which are harder, in the second year and gain the full A level. Each module may be a apecific exam or coursework. Your grade is determined by your combined UMS for each module; UMS is essentially how much you scored in the exam/coursework, but adjusted a little ('standardised') to compensate for an easy/hard paper.
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    How on earth were you able to do your gcses if you dnt hv a clue how the a level courses work
 
 
 
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