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"Literally" Watch

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    Obviously these days (I don't know for how long it's been this way; I haven't really paid attention) the word "Literally" can be used informally for emphasis:

    "I have received literally thousands of letters"

    And though it rarely adds anything meaningful to the sentence (for example "I'm literally starving" - you might as well take the "literally" out, as the "starving" says enough on it's own. Same for "I've literally been dead on my feet all day") It's pretty much accepted that lots of people (especially young people) will use it that way.

    But has anyone else noticed it's now just becoming a filler word for a lot of people?
    "I'm literally so hungry" for example.
    I only noticed a couple of weeks ago, but literally everyone (see what I did there?
    ) is doing it.
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    I have seen like lots more people use it. Like I don't know why.
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    What about when people use 'should of' instead of 'should have'? The 'literally' problem is also a great travesty however.

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    "Literally" should only be used when the subject being described actually happened.

    For example:

    I literally drank four litres of water last night.

    For this case, unless four litres of water was actually drunk, "literally" should not be used. "Figuratively" should be used.
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    (Original post by Krollo)
    What about when people use 'should of' instead of 'should have'? The 'literally' problem is also a great travesty however.

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    Or when "try and" is used instead of "try to".
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    "Literally" is second on my list of irritating filler words, behind "like."
    I have just noticed that EVERYONE says "like" constantly when they talk, and it gets so damn annoying as you cant stop noticing it.

    People who say "like" every 3 words are sent from satan.
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    (Original post by EatAndRevise)
    "Literally" should only be used when the subject being described actually happened.

    For example:

    I literally drank four litres of water last night.

    For this case, unless four litres of water was actually drunk, "literally" should not be used. "Figuratively" should be used.
    I agree, it should. But it's almost been accepted that it can be used informally for emphasis, even if the statement isn't to be taken literally.

    If it's not in the dictionaries that way now, it probably will be, in the newer ones.

    That's an irritant in itself - at least when used the way Jamie Redknapp uses it.
    But it's when it's used as a filler* that you just want to tell the person to read a book.

    *I'm not sure if 'filler' is the word I'm looking for, but basically it's used willy-nilly (probably out of habit), and adds nothing whatsoever to the statement - not even emphasis.
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    (Original post by Pennyarcade)
    "Literally" is second on my list of irritating filler words, behind "like."
    I have just noticed that EVERYONE says "like" constantly when they talk, and it gets so damn annoying as you cant stop noticing it.

    People who say "like" every 3 words are sent from satan.
    If someone says "like" not in proper context, they will be faced with me giving them an evil stare.

    It is even worse when someone uses "like' when typing.....
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    (Original post by Pennyarcade)
    "Literally" is second on my list of irritating filler words, behind "like."
    I have just noticed that EVERYONE says "like" constantly when they talk, and it gets so damn annoying as you cant stop noticing it.

    People who say "like" every 3 words are sent from satan.
    What filler words would you prefer people to use?
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    This thread topic LITERALLY makes me cringe.

    It is true that some people have cottoned on this word and have started using it like it is going out of fashion.
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    It's because there are so many people who don't actually know what 'literally' means. They hear it used by other mis-informed people. Then use it themselves. Monkey see, monkey do.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    What filler words would you prefer people to use?
    None. Talk properly.
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    (Original post by Pennyarcade)
    None. Talk properly.
    it is physically impossible to talk without using either filler words or just leaving


    big


    gaps

    in the middle of


    sentences.
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    Personally, I don't mind it, I'm not someone who find that word annoying.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    it is physically impossible to talk without using either filler words or just leaving


    big


    gaps

    in the middle of


    sentences.
    I do that if I'm put on the spot! That's why I like to plan all my sentences before I say them. The only time I use a filler (mostly "errrm") is when I'm answering a question so that I don't seem rude by instantly saying 'no' or whatever.
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    (Original post by easyastau)
    I do that if I'm put on the spot! That's why I like to plan all my sentences before I say them. The only time I use a filler (mostly "errrm") is when I'm answering a question so that I don't seem rude by instantly saying 'no' or whatever.
    It is physically impossible to think of the correct words as fast as you can say them, so unless you buy time by using fillers, you will soon grind to a halt. Continuously planning sentences in advance is unrealistic and very tiresome.

    Every single culture on earth has its own filler words. They are preferable to silence because silence indicates that you have finished talking and its the other person's turn to talk.

    I know a guy who doesn't use fillers and just has long pauses in his sentences. A lot of the time people think he has finished talking and just constantly interrupt him. He ends up not talking at all.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    It is physically impossible to think of the correct words as fast as you can say them, so unless you buy time by using fillers, you will soon grind to a halt. Continuously planning sentences in advance is unrealistic and very tiresome.

    Every single culture on earth has its own filler words. They are preferable to silence because silence indicates that you have finished talking and its the other person's turn to talk.

    I know a guy who doesn't use fillers and just has long pauses in his sentences. A lot of the time people think he has finished talking and just constantly interrupt him. He ends up not talking at all.
    I don't talk an awful lot so most of the time I can guess what people are going to ask me and have planned out answer. If I talk a lot then I'm talking about something that I'm passionate about and the words kind of come naturally. It's easy enough to speak with out fillers if you don't speak a lot.
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    Similar to when people say something is 'very unique'.
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    I literally couldn't care less about a person's choice of words.
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    It's a fad-word, perhaps a meme (in the original sense of the neologism). Its misuse will probably fade soon.
 
 
 
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