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When did you stop wearing nappies? Watch

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    I have a 3.5 year old brother who is still being potty trained. I hate it, my house is always a mess, I feel I can't have any friends round. Every room has a potty in it and all my brother wears is his training pants which he pees in then takes them of and leaves them on the floor! Whenever I complain about this my mum says that I was just as bad. Has anyone got any idea how much longer I have to put up with this?
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    I should add that I'm told that its normal at 3 to still not be potty trained.
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    Never


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    Still am.
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    Guess i gotta stop sometime :rolleyes:
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    My bro has autism and he was 7.

    I was about 1 year old and my other siblings were 12-18months. We were quick kids but it depends on your brothers pace. Don't be so mean, he'll grow out of it.
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    (Original post by vikram97the3rd)
    Never


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    Why?
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    (Original post by Lamptastic)
    My bro has autism and he was 7.

    I was about 1 year old and my other siblings were 12-18months. We were quick kids but it depends on your brothers pace. Don't be so mean, he'll grow out of it.
    Thanks for your reply. I didn't mean to be unkind about him, I just wanted some perspective as to when its normal to be trained and how long it takes.
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    (Original post by Brann)
    Thanks for your reply. I didn't mean to be unkind about him, I just wanted some perspective as to when its normal to be trained and how long it takes.
    Ok no worries

    From the NHS Choices website:

    "Children are able to control their bladder and bowels when they're physically ready and when they want to be dry and clean. Every child is different, so it's best not to compare your child with others.
    Bear in mind the following:
    most children can control their bowels before their bladder
    by the age of two, some children will be dry during the day, but this is still quite early
    by the age of three, 9 out of 10 children are dry most days – even then, all children have the odd accident, especially when they're excited, upset or absorbed in something else
    by the age of four, most children are reliably dry
    It usually takes a little longer to learn to stay dry throughout the night. Although most children learn this between the ages of three and five, it is estimated that a quarter of three-year-olds and one in six five-year-olds wet the bed."

    I hope that helps. I think the most important thing is to try and help your parents encourage your lil bro when he stays dry and teach him to put the soiled stuff away in the bin so he learns a little discipline too
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      We're ... supposed to stop wearing them?
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      Around 2
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      On my 18th birthday

      don't judge me :ninja:


      :rofl:
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      About 18 months I was told.

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      Women wear them until menopause.
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      (Original post by Maid Marian)
      We're ... supposed to stop wearing them?
      it's advised but I still wear them. i mean if you're on a night out and you just can't be bothered to go to the loo, you just do your business up the bottom of your back. blame the smell on someone else. make a big deal of it.
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      (Original post by Lamptastic)
      Ok no worries

      From the NHS Choices website:

      "Children are able to control their bladder and bowels when they're physically ready and when they want to be dry and clean. Every child is different, so it's best not to compare your child with others.
      Bear in mind the following:
      most children can control their bowels before their bladder
      by the age of two, some children will be dry during the day, but this is still quite early
      by the age of three, 9 out of 10 children are dry most days – even then, all children have the odd accident, especially when they're excited, upset or absorbed in something else
      by the age of four, most children are reliably dry
      It usually takes a little longer to learn to stay dry throughout the night. Although most children learn this between the ages of three and five, it is estimated that a quarter of three-year-olds and one in six five-year-olds wet the bed."

      I hope that helps. I think the most important thing is to try and help your parents encourage your lil bro when he stays dry and teach him to put the soiled stuff away in the bin so he learns a little discipline too
      Thanks again this is really helpful. Do you think it would help if he was not wearing pull ups?
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      (Original post by Brann)
      Thanks again this is really helpful. Do you think it would help if he was not wearing pull ups?
      Hmmm. I dunno since he should get in the habit of pulling them down and not soiling himself -just like real big boy pants.
      If he was not wearing anything he would just wet himself and that would be quite embarrassing for him and that tactic doesn't always bode well.
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      (Original post by Lamptastic)
      Hmmm. I dunno since he should get in the habit of pulling them down and not soiling himself -just like real big boy pants.
      If he was not wearing anything he would just wet himself and that would be quite embarrassing for him and that tactic doesn't always bode well.
      Ok, its just I had a suspicion that he was using the pull up just as nappy, like yesterday I was looking after him and his pull up was always wet soon after I would put one on him. I don't want him to be embarrassed though.
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      (Original post by Brann)
      Ok, its just I had a suspicion that he was using the pull up just as nappy, like yesterday I was looking after him and his pull up was always wet soon after I would put one on him. I don't want him to be embarrassed though.
      Perhaps try it and see how he gets on without during the day and let him have it at night?
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      (Original post by Lamptastic)
      Perhaps try it and see how he gets on without during the day and let him have it at night?
      Thanks, this seems like a good idea. I'll suggest this to my parents. I just think they worry about him peeing on the carpet ext to keep him in pull ups which are basically nappies.
     
     
     
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