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    I know most of C1 already, I just need to go over the modular book. I came across this question though, and I don't know what topic is required to solve it, or whether you need combined knowledge. Here is the question (9a) http://www.edexcel.com/migrationdocuments/QP%20GCE%20Curriculum%202000/June%202013%20-%20QP/6663_01R_que_20130513.pdf
    May you please share how to solve it and what topic/s go into answering it.
    Also C1 also requires knowledge of asymptotes. But.. so why arn't asymptotes on the C1 modular book? Or are they on it- and I've got an old C1 edexcel modular book? Please please please help.
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    Do you know what it means when a graph crosses the x-axis at a specific point?
    Also do you know what is mean if the graph touches the x-axis for example at (2,0)?
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    Isn't where it crosses the x-axis the root? Could you link the vids from exam solutions or mymaths/ m4ths/ maths247/ ukmathsteacher?
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    Isn't where it crosses the x-axis the root? Could you link the vids from exam solutions or mymaths/ m4ths/ maths247/ ukmathsteacher?
    Yup where it crosses it is a root and where it touches you have a repeated root. So you have (x-a)(x-b)^2 (where a and b are your coordinates) and you know that you are looking for a cubic equation so you can just expand.
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    I don't understand that. Have you got a video to link to me? It would be helpful despite having answered this the linear equation way. 5/5 marks. Yupee!!
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    I don't understand that. Have you got a video to link to me? It would be helpful despite having answered this the linear equation way. 5/5 marks. Yupee!!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ad_SdFphgE
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    I know most of C1 already, I just need to go over the modular book. I came across this question though, and I don't know what topic is required to solve it, or whether you need combined knowledge. Here is the question (9a) http://www.edexcel.com/migrationdocuments/QP%20GCE%20Curriculum%202000/June%202013%20-%20QP/6663_01R_que_20130513.pdf
    May you please share how to solve it and what topic/s go into answering it.
    Also C1 also requires knowledge of asymptotes. But.. so why arn't asymptotes on the C1 modular book? Or are they on it- and I've got an old C1 edexcel modular book? Please please please help.
    How to tackle that question and how to sketch functions with asymptotes is clearly explained in the standard text book and practice questions are there for you to try.
    Tell me to mind my own business if you wish but it seems to me you are not using your time effectively. You have asked questions on C1, M1 and S1 in the past few days, sometimes from text books sometimes from exam papers. You are fluttering around the syllabus like a butterfly on my lobelia bush. You would be far better to start the C1 book at the beginning, work through every chapter, do a selection of questions from each exercise and then all questions from the mixed exercise at the end of the chapter. In this way you'll give yourself a solid foundation to build the rest of your study on.


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    (Original post by gdunne42)
    In this way you'll give yourself a solid foundation to build the rest of your study on.
    prsom
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    prsom



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    tl;dr

    The curve crosses through the point (-1,0) and touches the points (2,0) so the roots are:

    (x+1)(x-2)(x-2) so just factorise this out... which you should get to be x^3-5x^2+8x-4
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    Ok, I will start from C1. I thought I was good at it recently when doing exam papers. However looking at the modular textbook there are many questions I cannot answer. Some- its the way they ask them- others I think I lack loads of knowledge. This is really worrying me and I suppose should act as motivation. For example 6B (Q 3) Prove that the (2n+1)th term of the sequence Un= (n^2)-1 is a multiple of 4. I know the formulas and have got full marks on multiple exam questions on sequences and series. Please help. What do I need to do to understand these questions and answer them all correctly. I understand C1 is terribly easy but the textbook has tricky questions
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    Ok, I will start from C1. I thought I was good at it recently when doing exam papers. However looking at the modular textbook there are many questions I cannot answer. Some- its the way they ask them- others I think I lack loads of knowledge. This is really worrying me and I suppose should act as motivation. For example 6B (Q 3) Prove that the (2n+1)th term of the sequence Un= (n^2)-1 is a multiple of 4. I know the formulas and have got full marks on multiple exam questions on sequences and series. Please help. What do I need to do to understand these questions and answer them all correctly. I understand C1 is terribly easy but the textbook has tricky questions
    Focus on one thing at at a time and don't be in a hurry to rush through things!

    You'll get far more benefit in the long run if you spend some time wrestling with the more difficult problems on a particular topic before moving on to the next one!
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    Ok, I will start from C1. I thought I was good at it recently when doing exam papers. However looking at the modular textbook there are many questions I cannot answer. Some- its the way they ask them- others I think I lack loads of knowledge. This is really worrying me and I suppose should act as motivation. For example 6B (Q 3) Prove that the (2n+1)th term of the sequence Un= (n^2)-1 is a multiple of 4. I know the formulas and have got full marks on multiple exam questions on sequences and series. Please help. What do I need to do to understand these questions and answer them all correctly. I understand C1 is terribly easy but the textbook has tricky questions
    You have learnt a valuable lesson that being able to do questions that have been set in past exams is no guarantee that you can do questions that could be set in the future. Most of the complaints that recent papers have been harder than ever before reflect the lack of proper study and over reliance on smashing past papers for 'learning'.

    Look back at what exercise 6B is about. The text book tries to build skill in a logical fashion. Each set of exercises is about a specific topic/skill with some of the later questions reflecting back on previous sections.
    You have a formula for the nth term and an algebraic expression for the value of n you need to evaluate (2n+1). Use your algebra skills to show that using this value in the given formula the result is a multiple of 4.

    Now go back to page 1 and do it properly.......
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    Prsom *10000
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    (Original post by MathsMeister)
    Prsom *10000



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    You seem to know so much about the way people learn maths. How do you know all this. Cannot prsom you enough. Uhh how did you learn maths alevel? What resources did you use? How did you go about revision? It seems as if you know a lot about the ideal way to learn it and the wrong way to learn it ( for example ''smashing exam papers for leaning) Please may you share anything else perhaps?
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    Nothing special, after a career doing other things I became a maths teacher. There are quite a few experienced teachers who contribute to the maths discussions and a lot of very knowledgeable students who offer good advice.
    For many years edexcel papers were very predictable and doing loads of past papers almost guaranteed a good grade, it has become very clear to teachers and others that they trying to inject more variety into their exams and some students are struggling with it. Those students who have truly mastered the maths adapt well to unfamiliar questions and they see much more variety in the text books than in past papers. That doesn't mean don't do past papers it just means you should learn and practice the content properly first.
    Your own teacher should be the best resource you can have, the standard edexcel text books are fine for study and revision (despite the M1 being full of mistakes), the examsolutions web site is a great resource for explanations and for help with past paper questions.

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    I have the edexcel modular books by Keith Pledger. I also have a cgp book, exam solutions, mymaths and m4ths. That's all I need surely? I just need to do all the questions from the start to finish.
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    Yep that's more than enough. Get to it


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