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Buying a new desktop computer for video & photo editing Watch

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    Hello all,

    I would like to purchase a new desktop PC for video and photo editing. The reason I'm opting for a desktop is because I feel I can get a much more powerful setup for a cheaper price and a laptop with similar specs will cost (correct me if I'm wrong).

    Now I'm a little lost with which setup I should go for. Should I build a custom PC or buy an already made one? And which sort of specs should I be looking for? I'm not going to be editing epically long videos, most probably up to around 5 minutes per video max. Although I will be doing a lot of photo editing but I'm pretty sure this is a lot less intensive than video editing.

    I've looked at some iMac's, but not too sure about getting a Mac as I'm aware that they can be quite overpriced. I would like, if possible to get a PC setup with 2 or even 3 screens. Although this isn't essential. I will be purchasing the Adobe Creative Suite when I get the PC to install. I'm also going to need a desk of some sort to put the PC on, the desk I currently have is pretty old and I'd like to change it.

    I don't have a budget as such, I have quite a bit of money to spend but ideally would like to spend around £1500 for everything, the desk, the PC, screens and any other accessories I will need. I can stretch this but only if I really need to, and if there is good reason to do so.

    Thanks a lot in advance for anybody that can help me out!
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    The most cost effective method would be to buy the components and put it together yourself, failing that custom would be better than off the shelf.
    Want to have a decent CPU and quite a bit of fast RAM. I'm not sure if 8GB would be enough given how small the clips will be, but it's not like an extra 8 will make much difference price wise.
    If the software has CUDA acceleration (and if it doesn't now it probably will do since nvidia is working with Adobe) it would probably be worth getting a nvidia GPU.
    There are some decent stands out there for mounting multiple displays on (obviously up to 4)
    Obviously want a fair bit of storage.
    New intel x79 CPUs should be coming out in a few months, but I guess you can't really afford to wait that long.
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    (Original post by Entrepreneur123)
    Hello all,

    I would like to purchase a new desktop PC for video and photo editing. The reason I'm opting for a desktop is because I feel I can get a much more powerful setup for a cheaper price and a laptop with similar specs will cost (correct me if I'm wrong).

    Now I'm a little lost with which setup I should go for. Should I build a custom PC or buy an already made one? And which sort of specs should I be looking for? I'm not going to be editing epically long videos, most probably up to around 5 minutes per video max. Although I will be doing a lot of photo editing but I'm pretty sure this is a lot less intensive than video editing.

    I've looked at some iMac's, but not too sure about getting a Mac as I'm aware that they can be quite overpriced. I would like, if possible to get a PC setup with 2 or even 3 screens. Although this isn't essential. I will be purchasing the Adobe Creative Suite when I get the PC to install. I'm also going to need a desk of some sort to put the PC on, the desk I currently have is pretty old and I'd like to change it.

    I don't have a budget as such, I have quite a bit of money to spend but ideally would like to spend around £1500 for everything, the desk, the PC, screens and any other accessories I will need. I can stretch this but only if I really need to, and if there is good reason to do so.

    Thanks a lot in advance for anybody that can help me out!
    I was in this dilemma as well. Was somewhat torn between self-custom build, custom build, off-shelf and an iMac.

    After doing all the calculations we found if you want good stuff then self/custom build will be significantly cheaper. This is especially true if you start asking for good graphic cards. Good graphic cards on its own is already expensive but when bought through an established computer manufacturer it becomes even more expensive especially when you start playing with any NVIDIA Quadro series.

    If you are looking at lower end systems then it is without a doubt you can get it very cheaply off shelf, it will be cheap to the point that you'd be silly to custom build as there won't be a chance you can beat them, however components in it won't be the best.

    Apple iMacs as long as you don't start being silly with the options like buying 32GB of RAM from Apple or a 32TB Raid system then the iMac won't really be any more expensive than a PC with high specification. If you are a uni student you can get 15% off the retail price or if you so happen to be going to Luxembourg you could buy one for 24% less than you would pay in UK. £1500 should easily get you a desk and a fairly decent iMac.

    In the end for myself as I was buying quite a few units for business purposes as we are running AutoCAD for architecture and engineering purposes we went with the iMacs not really because it was better but the financing terms were more manageable for us.

    As I was buying quite a few units for business purposes primarily to run AutoCAD, it finally boiled down to financing for which Apple offered a package that was more manageable.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    The most cost effective method would be to buy the components and put it together yourself, failing that custom would be better than off the shelf.
    Want to have a decent CPU and quite a bit of fast RAM. I'm not sure if 8GB would be enough given how small the clips will be, but it's not like an extra 8 will make much difference price wise.
    If the software has CUDA acceleration (and if it doesn't now it probably will do since nvidia is working with Adobe) it would probably be worth getting a nvidia GPU.
    There are some decent stands out there for mounting multiple displays on (obviously up to 4)
    Obviously want a fair bit of storage.
    New intel x79 CPUs should be coming out in a few months, but I guess you can't really afford to wait that long.
    So if you were in my shoes, what type of setup would you go for?

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    (Original post by Alfissti)
    I was in this dilemma as well. Was somewhat torn between self-custom build, custom build, off-shelf and an iMac.

    After doing all the calculations we found if you want good stuff then self/custom build will be significantly cheaper. This is especially true if you start asking for good graphic cards. Good graphic cards on its own is already expensive but when bought through an established computer manufacturer it becomes even more expensive especially when you start playing with any NVIDIA Quadro series.

    If you are looking at lower end systems then it is without a doubt you can get it very cheaply off shelf, it will be cheap to the point that you'd be silly to custom build as there won't be a chance you can beat them, however components in it won't be the best.

    Apple iMacs as long as you don't start being silly with the options like buying 32GB of RAM from Apple or a 32TB Raid system then the iMac won't really be any more expensive than a PC with high specification. If you are a uni student you can get 15% off the retail price or if you so happen to be going to Luxembourg you could buy one for 24% less than you would pay in UK. £1500 should easily get you a desk and a fairly decent iMac.

    In the end for myself as I was buying quite a few units for business purposes as we are running AutoCAD for architecture and engineering purposes we went with the iMacs not really because it was better but the financing terms were more manageable for us.

    As I was buying quite a few units for business purposes primarily to run AutoCAD, it finally boiled down to financing for which Apple offered a package that was more manageable.
    Yeah I'm a student. I was drawn to macs because I'm not too clued up on computer hardware and it seemed like an easy option just to buy an already made one. I know the basics like processor speeds and RAM, but not too much about models and such. I know that certain parts aren't compatible with others, and that you need a certain type of video card in order to have 2 screens. I don't really want to make a mistake and buy the wrong setup and have to shell out even more money buying some more components, so ready made appealed to me. But then again getting a custom model I know I'll get more for my money

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    (Original post by Entrepreneur123)
    Yeah I'm a student. I was drawn to macs because I'm not too clued up on computer hardware and it seemed like an easy option just to buy an already made one. I know the basics like processor speeds and RAM, but not too much about models and such. I know that certain parts aren't compatible with others, and that you need a certain type of video card in order to have 2 screens. I don't really want to make a mistake and buy the wrong setup and have to shell out even more money buying some more components, so ready made appealed to me. But then again getting a custom model I know I'll get more for my money

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    you get A LOT more for your money if set up well.


    (Original post by Entrepreneur123)
    So if you were in my shoes, what type of setup would you go for?

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    I would go for something not dissimilar to what I have now. 4930k (or 5930k if able to wait long enough), a decent nvidia GPU (but that's because when I do need to do any editing the software can use CUDA, and the rest of the time i prefer nvidia over amd) 16GB 1600MHz+ RAM. Few TB of HDDS, SSD for programs and OS, reliable PSU.
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    I would wait until later in the year. Haswell-E and DDR4 is coming out. The new GPUs are also coming out this year. Bad time to build a rig at the moment basically.
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    I would wait until later in the year. Haswell-E and DDR4 is coming out. The new GPUs are also coming out this year. Bad time to build a rig at the moment basically.
    Tbh, ddr4 won't be too worth it I reckon in this case. As for the new GPUs, this year could be a bit of a push.

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Tbh, ddr4 won't be too worth it I reckon in this case. As for the new GPUs, this year could be a bit of a push.

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    Haswell-E will use DDR4 so it's not like you have a choice if going with that anyway.

    GPUs are very likely for this year. Shots of the GTX 880 have already been leaked. They're going to be on the same 28nm die though unfortunately so i'm not going to upgrade until the 900 series.
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    Haswell-e can use DDR4.
    DDR4 supposedly will be up to 50% better than DDR3 ( I can't reference this, but I remember seeing it a month or two ago)
    X99 motherboards will be out alongside DDR4.
    the gtx 800 series improvement is only rumoured, ranging from the 880 doubling the 780 performance, to a minimal increase but much lower power consumption.
    for £1500 with 2-3 screens and a desk, it will be very troublesome to fit even a X79 chipset build into your budget, comfortably I can't do it. I'll allow £200 for a desk.
    I think this is a good place to start: http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/XcrVmG
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    (Original post by tearteto)
    Haswell-e can use DDR4.
    DDR4 supposedly will be up to 50% better than DDR3 ( I can't reference this, but I remember seeing it a month or two ago)
    X99 motherboards will be out alongside DDR4.
    the gtx 800 series improvement is only rumoured, ranging from the 880 doubling the 780 performance, to a minimal increase but much lower power consumption.
    for £1500 with 2-3 screens and a desk, it will be very troublesome to fit even a X79 chipset build into your budget, comfortably I can't do it. I'll allow £200 for a desk.
    I think this is a good place to start: http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/XcrVmG
    So I'll have to put this all together myself? Is that video card compatible with the 2 screens?
    (Original post by Camoxide)
    I would wait until later in the year. Haswell-E and DDR4 is coming out. The new GPUs are also coming out this year. Bad time to build a rig at the moment basically.
    I pretty much need something asap tbh. I can always upgrade later right? And I don't need the most epic system ever, just something that will perform what I need it to perform at a very good speed.
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    Haswell-E will use DDR4 so it's not like you have a choice if going with that anyway.
    But still, a lot of the mobo manufacturers have been very heavily hinting thst you could actually use Haswell-e with older boards, ie, ddr3

    GPUs are very likely for this year. Shots of the GTX 880 have already been leaked. They're going to be on the same 28nm die though unfortunately so i'm not going to upgrade until the 900 series.
    I haven't heard anything to indicate that they're coming any sooner than late Q4, and I've tried to keep on top of things since I'm looking for an upgrade, 2GB is becoming a bit of a stretch.


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    (Original post by tearteto)
    Haswell-e can use DDR4.
    DDR4 supposedly will be up to 50% better than DDR3 ( I can't reference this, but I remember seeing it a month or two ago)
    X99 motherboards will be out alongside DDR4.
    Way more than 50% better, most stats are doubling. Double the base clock to 3.2GHz; twice as many modules per DIMM; double the maximum capacity per module (which means theorecal 32GiB DIMMs on the consumer market)

    the gtx 800 series improvement is onlyh rumoured, ranging from the 880 doubling the 780 performance...
    How about no, figure I've most heard floating about is 20-30% based on previous shifts.

    ...to a minimal increase but much lower power consumption.
    If 750/750ti is anything to go by it will definitely be <200W.



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    Again these are just figures I've seen amongst rumours over the past few months ^_^ I can't verify their accuracy.
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    (Original post by Entrepreneur123)
    So I'll have to put this all together myself? Is that video card compatible with the 2 screens?


    I pretty much need something asap tbh. I can always upgrade later right? And I don't need the most epic system ever, just something that will perform what I need it to perform at a very good speed.
    Yes to all 3.
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    Build your own PC.
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    Do it!
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    (Original post by Entrepreneur123)
    So I'll have to put this all together myself? Is that video card compatible with the 2 screens?


    I pretty much need something asap tbh. I can always upgrade later right? And I don't need the most epic system ever, just something that will perform what I need it to perform at a very good speed.
    The problem is it's a new platform which means the current platform has met the end of its upgrade path. When DDR4 comes out DDR3 is going to keep more expensive and harder to come by.
    Stuff like the case and power supply you can keep forever. Buy good buy once. Had my case and power supply for around 5 years now and there's still no reason to change them.

    Guess you can go the consumer root and get Haswell i7 processor.
 
 
 
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