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    Quick question - just want to know what the actual chance of me getting into medicine via the GEM route and if it's worth my time.

    - BBB in bio, chem, physics.
    - Did foundation year engineering because didn't take maths, realised it wasn't for me and I really want to pursue medicine.

    I understand I need a 2:1 in a life sciences degree, will most likely go for biomedical sciences as it'll aid me for medicine.

    It's too late for me to apply via ucas, so I'll have to get a place via clearing. What're the chances of getting into a good uni like King's or Warwick via clearing? I understand they sometimes lower the entry requirements for clearing.

    Is biomed usually oversubscribed or in low demand? Are there any sciences that are in low demand, which will allow me to get into a top Uni via clearing (with reduced requirements)?

    Many thanks
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    If your sole intention is to get into GEM after graduation, it doesn't make a blind bit of difference which biomed course you do. People from mine (Salford) got onto medicine, and we're ranked something like ~65. Even those who didn't do GEM ended up on MSc's and PhDs etc, so unless you have a burning desire to do a competitive specialism without medicine I wouldn't worry too much.

    The main focus is getting the 2:1, preferably a 1st (potentially decreases GAMSAT cutoffs, but not UKCAT).
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    Yep. Someone from my uni which is ranked around 30 atm got into Oxford for GEM last year

    Really doesn't matter, it matters how well you do. So go somewhere you like, and somewhere you feel you can achieve highly!
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    As other people on here have said, a 2:1 is probably the minimum you would need. If you can get a 1st, then even better, but it all depends on the requirements of each individual University.

    Main thing is to therefore do your research. Try to find out which GEM programmes need 1st class degrees, which ones require UKCAT, BMAT etc, and which Unis have very high cut off scores for things such as the UKCAT.

    It sounds obvious, but to maximise your chances of getting into GEM, you must apply to your strengths.
    For example, my UKCAT was very average so I avoided places such as Newcastle and Warwick, which have very high cut off levels for interview. However, my degree score was very good so that opened the doors to other Unis.
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    (Original post by theepw)
    As other people on here have said, a 2:1 is probably the minimum you would need. If you can get a 1st, then even better, but it all depends on the requirements of each individual University.

    Main thing is to therefore do your research. Try to find out which GEM programmes need 1st class degrees, which ones require UKCAT, BMAT etc, and which Unis have very high cut off scores for things such as the UKCAT.

    It sounds obvious, but to maximise your chances of getting into GEM, you must apply to your strengths.
    For example, my UKCAT was very average so I avoided places such as Newcastle and Warwick, which have very high cut off levels for interview. However, my degree score was very good so that opened the doors to other Unis.
    I feel like it'd be best to apply to GAMSAT unis since you can actually prepare for it. Would that be a correct assumption?
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    In all honesty, I cannot comment on the GAMSAT as I did not sit it.
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    (Original post by theepw)
    In all honesty, I cannot comment on the GAMSAT as I did not sit it.
    Ah I see. Is it worth sitting the GAMSAT and UKCAT? I feel like it'd be a lot of stress!
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    (Original post by randomguy786)
    Ah I see. Is it worth sitting the GAMSAT and UKCAT? I feel like it'd be a lot of stress!
    I'd say GAMSAT preparation is a little more familiar, thus could be seen as slightly easier.
    However, GAMSAT is a 5 and a half hour long exam and you'll most likely need to travel for it. It's rather expensive and only a handful of places accept it.
    UKCAT preparation is quite odd. Literally do as many questions as you can; rather dull.
    It's a 2 hour paper and is more widely accepted. Total cost is about half what GAMSAT cost.

    That said, I personally think you should apply to where you'll be the strongest candidate. As with any exam, both GAMSAT and UKCAT are manageable with the right preparation.

    I'm doing both GAMSAT and UKCAT this cycle. If you wanted stress free living you haven't really chosen the right career path
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    (Original post by randomguy786)
    I feel like it'd be best to apply to GAMSAT unis since you can actually prepare for it. Would that be a correct assumption?
    Having background knowledge can be advantageous in the GAMSAT, but it doesn't guarantee a better result any more than practising UKCAT questions again and again does. The GAMSAT is also a marathon of an exam compared to the UKCAT and far more taxing, in my opinion.

    Then again, I never sat it with more than a relative modicum of prep compared to most other people, so probably not the best judge for it.
 
 
 
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