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    So i have an idea, I know it's very difficult to get work experience in the law industry, as i'm only 17 i have little chance of doing anything with a soliciter.
    So i came up with an idea:

    I go to court, observe, make notes and apply theory to the case i watch, and after it, get in contact with a member of the jury and ask them to read it. After doing this a couple of times, ask the member if they'd be happy to write a reference saying they've observed and feel it's been useful.

    How does this sound?
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    Write to law firms, or go to see them personally, and ask to shadow one of their lawyers. Offer to help with filing/office jobs in return - that way it isn't that difficult to get law experience.

    A juror is in no way legally trained, so couldn't help with the theory, and are officially not allowed to have any discussion of the case. Anyone who engages them in discussion must be reported to the court official. So in short: contacting a juror is a very bad idea.
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    (Original post by OwennB)
    So i have an idea, I know it's very difficult to get work experience in the law industry, as i'm only 17 i have little chance of doing anything with a soliciter.
    So i came up with an idea:

    I go to court, observe, make notes and apply theory to the case i watch, and after it, get in contact with a member of the jury and ask them to read it. After doing this a couple of times, ask the member if they'd be happy to write a reference saying they've observed and feel it's been useful.

    How does this sound?
    If you want to go to court, just write to some judges and ask if you can do some marshalling. You'd be surprised how willing a lot of them are to take willing students. You'd need to write to someone at their court, presumably; you can't get in touch with them directly unless you know their email addresses (or regular addresses, etc) already (although their email addresses are pretty predictably formulaic, emailing without permission would probably not be a good move).

    Even if you were able to talk to jurors, their reference wouldn't be worth anything. They aren't legally trained.
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    I think phoning small high street firms for some informal work experience will be better. Its certainly more successful than writing in my experience
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    I would not recommend attempting to contact jurors. Members of a jury are not to discuss case details, they are not legally trained and you will not be able to access their contact information.

    Instead I would contact local high street firms, even if it is only for a day or two of work shadowing. Email all the local firms in your area, utilise any legal links you may have, even if it is the solicitor your family use. You will get rejections but just keep persevering! All the best!


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    (Original post by OwennB)
    So i have an idea, I know it's very difficult to get work experience in the law industry, as i'm only 17 i have little chance of doing anything with a soliciter.
    So i came up with an idea:

    I go to court, observe, make notes and apply theory to the case i watch, and after it, get in contact with a member of the jury and ask them to read it. After doing this a couple of times, ask the member if they'd be happy to write a reference saying they've observed and feel it's been useful.

    How does this sound?
    I've been to see trials take place in courtrooms and justice centres, I've been told by law lecturers that is is fine to count as law experience. Little heads up though, you're not allowed to make notes, so I wouldn't end up being embarrassed in a courtroom if I were you.
    Just contact solicitors or legal firms and ask to shadow one of their associates or solicitors and offer to do filing, etc.
    Plus, the Jury are just random citizens so they dont understand the law well enough to do that.
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    (Original post by OwennB)
    So i have an idea, I know it's very difficult to get work experience in the law industry, as i'm only 17 i have little chance of doing anything with a soliciter.
    So i came up with an idea:

    I go to court, observe, make notes and apply theory to the case i watch, and after it, get in contact with a member of the jury and ask them to read it. After doing this a couple of times, ask the member if they'd be happy to write a reference saying they've observed and feel it's been useful.

    How does this sound?
    i applaud you for having the initiative to want to do something like this.
    pay no attention to those who tell you otherwise.

    the British jury system is a famed and renowned one.
    but unfortunately of late, for the wrong reasons.
    there's been cases of collapsed trials due to jury members contacting the accused, befriending them, being in a relationship with them and this is unacceptable.

    look at the bigger picture.
    we only know of such incidents if the jury member's actions were found out.
    but the crucial question is this.
    what about those that went undetected?
    how many accused persons have gotten off scot-free?
    how many of them have been imprisoned on the wrong basis?
    we will never know the exact number but as long as one case where instance of jury members being in contact with the accused is made known, this is enough to tarnish the trial by jury system in UK.

    your intention of wanting to contact a jury member or getting him to write a reference is unwelcomed.
    it is against the law. so drop the idea and never revisit it ever again.

    to say that getting work experience in the law industry due to your young age is inaccurate.
    email a couple of law firms, explain your situation and ask if you could come in on weekends.
    your email should contain a resume of you (academic & otherwise) and a write-up about what you want to do with this experience.
    let them know that you don't want to be paid or that being paid is the least of your worries.
    you only want to shadow a barrister or solicitor in office.

    if i managed to do it, I don't see why you or others can't.
    keep knocking on all the doors until one opens.

    you also need to understand that the large number of people (in reference to current or prospective law students) on this forum are either aspiring or rejected Oxbridge candidates.
    the content of the PS will all be the same.
    they talk the same, think the same and sound the same.

    on the other hand, you want to do something different.
    this, coupled with a write-up from the barristers/solictors you've shadowed plus your good grades will hold you in good stead when applying for a place on a law programme at university level.

    if you need more advice, look at my contact list.
    most of the people on there are current or prospective law students.
    they stand out because they think differently than the majority.
    and this is precisely why they're on my contact list.

    good luck and all the best.
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    This is how people used to train to be barristers in Blackstone's day. There were no qualifications - just turn up at court every day and watch until you felt you knew enough to give it a go yourself.
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    This is a really bad idea. Essentially you're trying to tell the jury what the law is, which is the role of the judge alone - your (mis)information could be enough to affect the outcome of the trial. I haven't studied criminal procedure enough to know the precise name of the "wrong" that you'd be committing, but something along the lines of "perverting the course of justice", or causing a mistrial, isn't outside the realms of possibility.
 
 
 
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