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    Which Degree is more demanding. Both are apparently extremely difficult. I was just wondering out of curiosity which one is more demanding.
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    Math 55.
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    Well they're a bit difficult to compare given that one is an undergraduate degree, the other is a first year course...

    That said, Math 55 as a first year course is more difficult than anything you'd encounter in the first year of Cambridge undergraduate maths. A lot of the content of Math 55a and 55b is covered in second year at Oxford/Cambridge.
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    Would have said Maths 55 imo
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Well they're a bit difficult to compare given that one is an undergraduate degree, the other is a first year course...

    That said, Math 55 as a first year course is more difficult than anything you'd encounter in the first year of Cambridge undergraduate maths. A lot of the content of Math 55a and 55b is covered in second year at Oxford/Cambridge.
    I may be wrong but isn't math 55 a one year intensive undergraduate degree? If this is not the case then what do the math 55 students do after that one year I am a little confused?

    Secondly, in terms of content do you think maths at Harvard is more demanding content wise than Oxford/Cambridge?
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    (Original post by Hamzah17)
    I may be wrong but isn't math 55 a one year intensive undergraduate degree? If this is not the case then what do the math 55 students do after that one year I am a little confused?

    Secondly, in terms of content do you think maths at Harvard is more demanding content wise than Oxford/Cambridge?
    It is a two semester long (so one-year long) option that is available to those doing undergraduate maths at Harvard, it isn't a degree by itself.

    Do I think maths at Harvard is more demanding? I don't know, but I'm tempted to say no because it takes 5-7 years to do a PhD in maths at Harvard (as is the case across the whole of the USA) because students generally need to do a further ~2 years of study. That isn't true in the UK where PhD students typically go straight into research and, in fact, UK students at Oxford/Cambridge going onto a PhD over in the USA can usually skip the first couple of years of the PhD by passing certain assessments.
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    (Original post by Hamzah17)
    I may be wrong but isn't math 55 a one year intensive undergraduate degree? If this is not the case then what do the math 55 students do after that one year I am a little confused?
    Take other courses. Math 55 is intense but a small portion of a typical UK degree at a good university. The course is intended to challenge the absolute best. It is not intended to be a replacement from attending the remaining courses Harvard offers. If you dig around the Harvard maths website, it discourages people from jumping to advanced courses too early, because you need a solid foundation in core content.

    Math 55 really doesn't sound like fun to me, but then I'm not in the intended audience so

    Secondly, in terms of content do you think maths at Harvard is more demanding content wise than Oxford/Cambridge?
    I think it's just different. From what I can tell, you would typically specialise a lot more in the US, because you don't have the time to do as much maths as you would in the UK. UK universities allow you to get a deep understanding of multiple areas of mathematics; which is why in the US, you are required to sit qualifying exams in grad school before you go on to do mathematical research.

    On the other hand, the US system might allow specialisms at undergraduate level, but you cannot get away with it in your PhD as you are expected to have a very solid understanding of algebra, analysis, topology, algebraic geometry and complex analysis to pass the qualifying exam (in an Ivy league school).

    Finally, Cambridge (and presumably Oxford) have mechanisms to keep their best students entertained if the normal course is too easy, such as accelerating certain courses (in Cambridge).
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    Math 55 was the reason I didn't go to Harvard (ok not the only reason) but the whole idea of it really put me off.


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