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The US and UK banning uncharged electronic devices on flights? Watch

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    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-work-security

    The US announced earlier in the week that passengers were required to show electronic devices in their hand luggage could be powered up. If they couldn't be then passengers either had to leave the item behind or in some cases they aren't allowed to fly.

    On Tuesday it was also announced that the UK was following in the US' steps. If your mobile, laptop, e-reader or gaming device is out of battery when you are boarding the plane then you won't be allowed to take it on with you.

    These security measures have been put in place after reports that al-Qaida have developed bombs that may be hidden in mobile phones- especially Samsung Galaxy and iPhones.


    There is some controversy surrounding this- yes, there is the need for safety and security from terrorism. By preventing any uncharged devices being allowed in hand luggage you are reducing the risk of a terrorist attack with these new bombs.

    However- as many Samsung Galaxy and iPhone users know, battery life is terrible and in the case of a delay phone batteries may run out by accident. Should innocent people have to either miss their flights/loose their devices because of this risk?

    Airports have not got capable charging facilities, and they have no plans to create any- surely if this rule is being implemented they should provide these facilities for their customers who are paying for this service but have a phone with poor battery life?

    What is your opinion on the new regulations- do you believe that it is a smart idea that should have been implemented years ago? Or do you believe that it will cause more havoc?
    Will it put you off flying if you know you run the risk of loosing your device?
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    So long as the airports provide free-to-use charging points, I see no reason to not be OK with this.
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    As with most airport security measures, it's just a kneejerk reaction to make it look like they are doing something, but it will have minimal effect on me because I always carry all my chargers in my hand luggage. Being the screaming neurotic that I am, I assume my checked in luggage will go missing, thereby causing me massive inconvenience and expense and rendering my electronic devices useless. Makes sense to me
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    I don't understand.. how does being able to charge a phone show that there's no bomb inside of it?
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    (Original post by HappyHylian)
    I don't understand.. how does being able to charge a phone show that there's no bomb inside of it?
    Presumably it shows it's a real functioning phone. I doubt the makers of iphones leave so much free space inside that you can stuff a bomb in there as well.
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    Just more of the usual to keep the population in a state of fear and dependency on our increasingly tyrannical government. More and more we're going to keep being duped into letting the elite eat away at our privacy.

    How come it's when ISIS is marching towards Bagdad that now Al-Qaeda suddenly has some genius bombmakers we need extra security against? Why are the government being so selective about when to release information? Why is the UK always taking information and orders from the US? There is no way the security services expect to find anything with these checks, so what's this all for? These 'terrorist threats' wouldn't have happened if our deranged leaders didn't go abroad and demolish the political, economic and social stability of the Middle East anyway.

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    Aren't lithium ion batteries meant to be quite explosive anyway if subjected to the right (wrong) kind of conditions?

    Unfortunately it's only a matter of time before some nutjob has some kind of explosive device surgically implanted in them.
    Then we'll probably see everybody being subjected to a full bodyscan.
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    (Original post by Josh_B)
    Unfortunately it's only a matter of time before some nutjob has some kind of explosive device surgically implanted in them.
    Then we'll probably see everybody being subjected to a full bodyscan.
    That's been done. It's featured in pop culture, it even has it's own acronym: SIIED
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    With a young brother, my phone is often run down, especially with flight delays when after hours of waiting, yes I stick him on my phone and let him play - with the failing battery life of my 4S, and 2 plugs for every 200-300 passengers, you can't charge your phone. Introduce decent charging facilities at least, but still, sometimes you can't help letting your phone run out of battery... Ridiculous rules...
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    (Original post by Josh_B)
    Aren't lithium ion batteries meant to be quite explosive anyway if subjected to the right (wrong) kind of conditions?

    Unfortunately it's only a matter of time before some nutjob has some kind of explosive device surgically implanted in them.
    Then we'll probably see everybody being subjected to a full bodyscan.

    I doubt a lithium ion battery could take down a plane.

    (Original post by HappyHylian)
    I don't understand.. how does being able to charge a phone show that there's no bomb inside of it?
    It shows it's a functioning phone rather than, I'd imagine, something else that requires an electrical circuit and some else in the battery compartment.

    (Original post by skd1996)
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-work-security

    The US announced earlier in the week that passengers were required to show electronic devices in their hand luggage could be powered up. If they couldn't be then passengers either had to leave the item behind or in some cases they aren't allowed to fly.

    What is your opinion on the new regulations- do you believe that it is a smart idea that should have been implemented years ago? Or do you believe that it will cause more havoc?
    Will it put you off flying if you know you run the risk of loosing your device?
    Seems like a little bit of sensationalism; if you're so concerned about your phone running out of charge don't take it on as hand luggage.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    That's been done. It's featured in pop culture, it even has it's own acronym: SIIED
    I thought I'd heard about one somewhere. I also think I've heard of an animal having one surgically implanted inside of it. Disgusting!
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    I doubt a lithium ion battery could take down a plane.
    I highly doubt one could either, or at least not a mobile phone one. But there have been incidents apparently caused by these batteries.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ous-cargo.html

    This link seems to think MH370 could have been brought down because of a group of them. I've got no idea how true the story is though.
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    Seems like a little bit of sensationalism; if you're so concerned about your phone running out of charge don't take it on as hand luggage.
    But some people don't feel comfortable putting their expensive, breakable items into the hold luggage- due to cases going missing or items being stolen from cases or cases going to the wrong destination. I wouldn't feel comfortable putting a phone I paid nearly £500 into hold luggage in case something goes wrong.
    Also, some people don't travel with hold luggage- they may only take their laptop with them for a day business trip- how will they cope with that?


    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    With a young brother, my phone is often run down, especially with flight delays when after hours of waiting, yes I stick him on my phone and let him play - with the failing battery life of my 4S, and 2 plugs for every 200-300 passengers, you can't charge your phone. Introduce decent charging facilities at least, but still, sometimes you can't help letting your phone run out of battery... Ridiculous rules...
    I completely agree with this. Sometimes you can't help but run out of battery- what happens to all the nintendos or other devices that young children are playing on all day waiting for departure? Surely at some point they will run out! If flights are delayed and there's not enough access points for 200-500 people then how can airports expect phones not to deplete in battery life?

    Also- what happens when coming back into the UK? Most holidays I've been on I've been chucked out of the hotel room at midday, and with late night flights how is a phone/gaming device/laptop meant to last all that time? It's not as simple as not going on it at all- some people may need to for work, contacting family members, keeping stroppy toddlers quiet.
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    (Original post by skd1996)
    But some people don't feel comfortable putting their expensive, breakable items into the hold luggage- due to cases going missing or items being stolen from cases or cases going to the wrong destination. I wouldn't feel comfortable putting a phone I paid nearly £500 into hold luggage in case something goes wrong.
    Also, some people don't travel with hold luggage- they may only take their laptop with them for a day business trip- how will they cope with that?




    I completely agree with this. Sometimes you can't help but run out of battery- what happens to all the nintendos or other devices that young children are playing on all day waiting for departure? Surely at some point they will run out! If flights are delayed and there's not enough access points for 200-500 people then how can airports expect phones not to deplete in battery life?

    Also- what happens when coming back into the UK? Most holidays I've been on I've been chucked out of the hotel room at midday, and with late night flights how is a phone/gaming device/laptop meant to last all that time? It's not as simple as not going on it at all- some people may need to for work, contacting family members, keeping stroppy toddlers quiet.
    Exactly, it's yet another thing the TSA have thought will help, other countries following on, yet not properly and practically thought through... I don't think the job they do is stupid, as it is necessary, but I do think the people sitting in their office, whom don't have to be submitted to the ridiculous security we have to be put through, need to use their heads a bit more... or we should let them go through the same measures we go through, and see how they DON'T cope...
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Presumably it shows it's a real functioning phone. I doubt the makers of iphones leave so much free space inside that you can stuff a bomb in there as well.
    They're mostly full of battery, surely you could just put a smaller battery in there and you would free up the majority of the space.
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    (Original post by n00)
    They're mostly full of battery, surely you could just put a smaller battery in there and you would free up the majority of the space.
    I'm pleased to say I don't know if that tiny space could fit a bomb in it big enough to bring a plane down. I somehow doubt it, but what do I know?
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    I'm pleased to say I don't know if that tiny space could fit a bomb in it big enough to bring a plane down. I somehow doubt it, but what do I know?
    If the majority of the phone isn't enough then I somehow doubt if the rest of it will make much difference.
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    (Original post by skd1996)
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-work-security

    The US announced earlier in the week that passengers were required to show electronic devices in their hand luggage could be powered up. If they couldn't be then passengers either had to leave the item behind or in some cases they aren't allowed to fly.

    On Tuesday it was also announced that the UK was following in the US' steps. If your mobile, laptop, e-reader or gaming device is out of battery when you are boarding the plane then you won't be allowed to take it on with you.

    These security measures have been put in place after reports that al-Qaida have developed bombs that may be hidden in mobile phones- especially Samsung Galaxy and iPhones.


    There is some controversy surrounding this- yes, there is the need for safety and security from terrorism. By preventing any uncharged devices being allowed in hand luggage you are reducing the risk of a terrorist attack with these new bombs.

    However- as many Samsung Galaxy and iPhone users know, battery life is terrible and in the case of a delay phone batteries may run out by accident. Should innocent people have to either miss their flights/loose their devices because of this risk?

    Airports have not got capable charging facilities, and they have no plans to create any- surely if this rule is being implemented they should provide these facilities for their customers who are paying for this service but have a phone with poor battery life?

    What is your opinion on the new regulations- do you believe that it is a smart idea that should have been implemented years ago? Or do you believe that it will cause more havoc?
    Will it put you off flying if you know you run the risk of loosing your device?
    In Mexico airports have free charging facilities. Such a simple solution lmao.

    UK and USA out common-sensed by Mexico :rolleyes:
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    Well obviously Intelligence services of the US have discovered a viable threat regarding electronic devices and have shared that information with MI5/MI6 who have then agreed with the US security measures, they wouldn't do something like this if their wasn't a viable threat, obviously they aren't going to come out with everything they have discovered there are plenty of undercover agents risking their lives as we speak to discover vital intelligence as we speak.

    As for it being a bother, it's not hard to stay off your phone untill after you get passed security it isn't exactly hard to stay off your phone for a few hours.

    I can guarantee you if the Intelligence Services had discovered the threat and not acted on it and then one of these devices had gone off and a plane had been blown out of the sky, then people moaning would have been the same ones having a go at them for not acting on the information they had.
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    I seriously doubt airports wont have a electricity socet. Its not as if you need phone to be fully charged, just plug into a socket at security station and show that it works.
    Not really a big deal.
 
 
 
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